East End of London

East EndEast LondonLondon's East EndEastLondon East EndEast EndersLondon’s East Endthe East EndEast End LondonEast End Londoners
The East End of London, usually called the East End, is the historic core of wider East London, east of the Roman and medieval walls of the City of London, and north of the River Thames.wikipedia
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Spitalfields

Spital SquareSt. Mary SpitalSpital Fields
The area had a strong pull on the rural poor from other parts of England, and attracted waves of migration from further afield, notably Huguenot refugees, who created a new extramural suburb in Spitalfields in the 17th century, Irish weavers, Ashkenazi Jews, and, in the 20th century, Sylheti Bangladeshis.
Spitalfields is a district in the East End of London and within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets.

London Borough of Tower Hamlets

Tower HamletsBorough of Tower HamletsTower Hamlets Borough
Beyond the small eastern extra-mural wards, the narrowest definition restricts the East End to the modern London Borough of Tower Hamlets.
Tower Hamlets is located in East London and covers much of the traditional East End.

Hoxton

Hoxton, LondonHoxton Bar & GrillHoxton Baths
A more common preference is to add to Tower Hamlets the former parish and borough of Shoreditch (including Hoxton and Haggerston, now the southern part of the modern London Borough of Hackney, which fall within the E1 and E2 postcode districts).
Together with the rest of Shoreditch, it is often described as part of the East End, the historic core of wider East London.

East London

EastEast London, England East London, Eastern Cape
The East End of London, usually called the East End, is the historic core of wider East London, east of the Roman and medieval walls of the City of London, and north of the River Thames.
The East End of London is a subset of East London, consisting of areas close to the ancient City of London.

Haggerston

A more common preference is to add to Tower Hamlets the former parish and borough of Shoreditch (including Hoxton and Haggerston, now the southern part of the modern London Borough of Hackney, which fall within the E1 and E2 postcode districts).
It is within the London Borough of Hackney and is considered to be a part of London’s East End.

Bow, London

BowStratford-le-BowBow, East London
The lands east of the City had always been used as hunting grounds for bishops and royalty, with King John establishing a palace at Bow.
Bow is an area in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets in East End of London, England.

Portsoken

In extending from the line of the former walls, the area is taken to include the small ancient extra-mural City wards of Portsoken and Bishopsgate Without (as established until boundary reviews in the 21st century).
It is mainly residential, and is sometimes considered to be part of the East End of London.

Queen Elizabeth Olympic Park

Olympic ParkOlympic Park, LondonLondon Olympic Park
The Canary Wharf development improved infrastructure, and the Olympic Park mean that the East End is undergoing further change, but some parts continue to contain some of the worst poverty in Britain.
The site covers parts of Stratford, Bow, Leyton, and Hackney Wick in east London, overlooking the A12 road.

Aldgate Pump

The term “East of Aldgate Pump” is used as a synonym for the area, as is “Within the sound of Bow Bells”, though the latter is figurative as the bell’s audible range is more extensive than any of the uncertain definitions of the East End area.
The pump is notable for its long, and sometimes dark history, as well as its cultural significance as a symbolic start point of the East End of London.

Bishopsgate

Bishopsgate StreetBishopsgate WithoutBishopgate
In extending from the line of the former walls, the area is taken to include the small ancient extra-mural City wards of Portsoken and Bishopsgate Without (as established until boundary reviews in the 21st century). The East End began with the medieval growth of London beyond its walls, along the Roman roads leading from Bishopsgate and Aldgate and also alongside the Thames.
Bishopsgate Without is described as part of London's East End.

Bethnal Green

Globe TownBethnal Green, LondonBethnal Green Road
Royalty such as King John had had a hunting lodge at Bromley-by-Bow, and the Bishop of London had a palace at Bethnal Green, but later these estates began to be split up, and estates of fine houses for captains, merchants and owners of manufacturers began to be built.
Bethnal Green is an area in the East End of London which lies 3.3 mi northeast of Charing Cross.

City of London

CityLondonthe City
The East End of London, usually called the East End, is the historic core of wider East London, east of the Roman and medieval walls of the City of London, and north of the River Thames. In extending from the line of the former walls, the area is taken to include the small ancient extra-mural City wards of Portsoken and Bishopsgate Without (as established until boundary reviews in the 21st century).
To the East the Port of London grew rapidly during the century, with the construction of many docks, needed as the Thames at the City could not cope with the volume of trade.

Stepney

Stepney GreenStepney Historical TrustStepney, London
Samuel Pepys moved his family and goods to Bethnal Green during the Great Fire of London, and Captain Cook moved from Shadwell to Stepney Green, where a school and assembly rooms had been established (commemorated by Assembly Passage, and a plaque on the site of Cook's house on the Mile End Road).
Stepney, also known as Stepney Green, is a district in the East End of London in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets that grew out of a merging of both a medieval village around St Dunstan's church and a 15th-century ribbon development of Mile End Road called Stepney Green.

Aldgate

Aldgate WardAldgate High Streetthe Ward of Aldgate
The East End began with the medieval growth of London beyond its walls, along the Roman roads leading from Bishopsgate and Aldgate and also alongside the Thames.
The wider area is considered to extend further East into the historic East End and the Tower Hamlet electoral wards of Spitalfields and Whitechapel.

Tower Bridge

London Tower BridgeBridge MastersTower Bridge Exhibition
On the river, Tower Bridge is also sometimes described in these terms.
In the second half of the 19th century, increased commercial development in the East End of London led to demands for a new river crossing downstream of London Bridge.

Mile End

Mile End Old TownMile End GreenMile End Road
The former location of roperies can still be identified from their long straight, narrow profile in the modern streets, for instance Ropery Street near Mile End.
Mile End is a district in the East End of London, England, 3.6 mi east-northeast of Charing Cross.

Old Nichol

Old Nichol Street Rookery
These included the creation of the world's first council housing, the LCC Boundary Estate, which replaced the neglected and crowded streets of Friars Mount, better known as The Old Nichol Street Rookery.
The Old Nichol, also known as the Nichol or the Old Nichol Street Rookery, was an area of housing in the East End of London, between Shoreditch High Street and Hackney Road in the north, and Spitalfields in the south.

Boundary Estate

Arnold CircusBoundaryBoundary Gardens Scheme
These included the creation of the world's first council housing, the LCC Boundary Estate, which replaced the neglected and crowded streets of Friars Mount, better known as The Old Nichol Street Rookery.
The Boundary Estate is a housing development in Shoreditch, formally opened in 1900, in the East End and in East London, England.

Ilford

Ilford, EssexGreat IlfordIlford Town Centre
Other commentators prefer a definition broader still, encompassing districts east of the Lea (i.e. east and north-east of Tower Hamlets), such as West Ham, East Ham, Leyton, Walthamstow and Ilford.
To the west of the town is Stratford and the East End, east is Romford, north is Epping Forest and south is Barking.

St Katharine Docks

St Katherine DocksSt KatharineSt. Katherine Docks
The most central docks, St Katharine Docks, were built in 1828 to accommodate luxury goods, clearing the slums that lay in the area of the former Hospital of St Katharine.
St Katharine Docks is a former dock and now a mixed-used district in Central London, in the London Borough of Tower Hamlets and within the East End.

James Cook

Captain CookCaptain James CookCook
Samuel Pepys moved his family and goods to Bethnal Green during the Great Fire of London, and Captain Cook moved from Shadwell to Stepney Green, where a school and assembly rooms had been established (commemorated by Assembly Passage, and a plaque on the site of Cook's house on the Mile End Road).
When not at sea, Cook lived in the East End of London.

Whitechapel

Whitechapel, LondonWhitechapel Idea StoreSt. Mary, Whitechapel
William Booth began his Christian Revival Society in 1865, preaching the gospel in a tent erected in the Friends Burial Ground, Thomas Street, Whitechapel.
It is a part of the East End of London, 3.4 mi east of Charing Cross.

Bishopsgate railway station

BishopsgateShoreditchBishopsgate Goods Yard
The building of London termini at Fenchurch Street (1841), and Bishopsgate (1840) provided access to new suburbs across the River Lea, again resulting in the destruction of housing and increased overcrowding in the slums.
Bishopsgate was a railway station located on the eastern side of Shoreditch High Street in the parish of Bethnal Green (now within the London Borough of Tower Hamlets) on the western edge of the East End of London and just outside the City of London.

Clement Attlee

AttleeEarl AttleeAttlee government
Notable residents of Toynbee Hall included R. H. Tawney, Clement Attlee, Guglielmo Marconi, and William Beveridge.
The volunteer work he carried out in London's East End exposed him to poverty and his political views shifted leftwards thereafter.

Toynbee Hall

ToynbeeToynbee Hall and University SettlementToynbee Studios
In 1884, the Settlement movement was founded, with settlements such as Toynbee Hall and Oxford House, to encourage university students to live and work in the slums, experience the conditions and try to alleviate some of the poverty and misery in the East End.
Founded by Henrietta and Samuel Barnett in 1884 in the economically depressed East End of London, it was named in memory of their friend and fellow reformer, Oxford historian Arnold Toynbee, who had died the previous year.