East Germanic languages

East GermanicEastEast Germanic languageEastern GermanicEast Germanic branchEast Germanic tribesEast Germanic-speakingeastgermanic
The East Germanic languages, also called the Oder–Vistula Germanic languages, are a group of extinct Germanic languages spoken by East Germanic peoples.wikipedia
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Gothic language

GothicVisigothicGoth.
The only East Germanic languages of which texts are known are Gothic and its later close relative, Crimean Gothic. Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.
Gothic is an extinct East Germanic language that was spoken by the Goths.

Crimean Gothic

Crimean Gothic languageGothic, Crimean
The only East Germanic languages of which texts are known are Gothic and its later close relative, Crimean Gothic.
Crimean Gothic was an East Germanic language spoken by the Crimean Goths in some isolated locations in Crimea until the late 18th century.

Germanic languages

GermanicGermanic languageGerman
The East Germanic languages, also called the Oder–Vistula Germanic languages, are a group of extinct Germanic languages spoken by East Germanic peoples.
The East Germanic branch included Gothic, Burgundian, and Vandalic, all of which are now extinct.

Vandalic language

VandalicVandalxvn
Other languages that are assumed to be East Germanic include Vandalic and Burgundian, though very few texts in these languages are known.
It was probably closely related to Gothic, and as such is traditionally classified as an East Germanic language.

Germanic peoples

GermanicGermanic tribesGermanic tribe
The East Germanic languages, also called the Oder–Vistula Germanic languages, are a group of extinct Germanic languages spoken by East Germanic peoples. Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.
The more easterly groups such as the Vandals are thought to have been united in the use of East Germanic languages, the most famous of which is Gothic.

North Germanic peoples

North GermanicScandinaviansNorse
Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.
The early Germanic tribes that migrated from Scandinavia became speakers of East Germanic dialects.

Herules

HeruliHerulsHerulian
The Herules (or Heruli) were an East Germanic tribe who lived north of the Black Sea apparently near the Sea of Azov, in the third century AD, and later moved (either wholly or partly) to the Roman frontier on the central European Danube, at the same time as many eastern barbarians during late antiquity, such as the Goths, Huns, Scirii, Rugii and Alans.

Burgundians

BurgundianBurgundyBurgundiones
Other languages that are assumed to be East Germanic include Vandalic and Burgundian, though very few texts in these languages are known.
Pliny (IV.28) however mentions them among the Vandalic or Eastern Germanic Germani peoples, including also the Goths.

Bastarnae

BasternaePeuciniBastarns
77 AD), classifies the Bastarnae and Peucini as being one of the five main subdivisions of Germanic peoples (the other subdivisions are three West Germanic tribes, the Inguaeones, Istuaeones and Hermiones, and the East Germanic Vandili, but he classifies differently than the Bastarnae).

Rugii

RugiansRugianHolmrygr
The Rugii, also Rugians, Rygir, Ulmerugi, or Holmrygir (Rugiere, Rugier) were an East Germanic tribe who migrated from southwest Norway to Pomerania around 100 AD, and from there to the Danube River valley.

Germanic verb

preterite-present verbpreterite-presentstrong verbs
It in turn divided into North, West and East Germanic groups, and ultimately produced a large group of mediaeval and modern languages, most importantly: Danish, Norwegian, and Swedish (North); English, Frisian, Dutch and German (West); and Gothic (East, extinct).

North Germanic languages

ScandinavianScandinavian languagesNorth Germanic
The North Germanic languages make up one of the three branches of the Germanic languages, a sub-family of the Indo-European languages, along with the West Germanic languages and the extinct East Germanic languages.

West Germanic languages

West GermanicWest Germanic languageWest
The West Germanic languages constitute the largest of the three branches of the Germanic family of languages (the others being the North Germanic and the extinct East Germanic languages).

Thervingi

TervingiThervingsThervingian
As a branch of the Goths, the Thervinigi spoke Thervinigi dialect of Gothic, an extinct East Germanic language.

Goths

GothicGothGutones
All other East Germanic languages are known, if at all, from proper names or short phrases that survived in historical accounts, and from loan-words in other languages.

Vandals

VandalVandalicVandal Kingdom
Very little is known about the Vandalic language itself, which was of the East Germanic linguistic branch.

Crimea

Crimean PeninsulaCrimeanAutonomous Republic of Crimea
Crimean Gothic, the last remaining East Germanic language, is believed to have survived until the 18th century in isolated areas of Crimea.

Pomponius Mela

Melaclassical geographersDe Situ Orbis
By the 1st century AD, the writings of Pomponius Mela, Pliny the Elder, and Tacitus indicate a division of Germanic-speaking peoples into large groupings with shared ancestry and culture.

Pliny the Elder

PlinyPlin.Plinius
By the 1st century AD, the writings of Pomponius Mela, Pliny the Elder, and Tacitus indicate a division of Germanic-speaking peoples into large groupings with shared ancestry and culture.

Tacitus

Publius Cornelius TacitusCornelius TacitusGaius Cornelius Tacitus
By the 1st century AD, the writings of Pomponius Mela, Pliny the Elder, and Tacitus indicate a division of Germanic-speaking peoples into large groupings with shared ancestry and culture.

Jordanes

Jordanis
Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.

Procopius

Procopius of CaesareaDe aedificiisSecret History
Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.

Paul the Deacon

Paulus DiaconusPaulusPaolo Diacono
Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.

Linguistics

linguistlinguisticlinguists
Based on accounts by Jordanes, Procopius, Paul the Deacon and others; linguistic evidence (see Gothic language); placename evidence; and archaeological evidence, it is believed that the East Germanic tribes, the speakers of the East Germanic languages related to the North Germanic tribes, had migrated from Scandinavia into the area lying east of the Elbe.