East India House

East-India House
East India House was the London headquarters of the East India Company, from which much of British India was governed until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India in 1858.wikipedia
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Lloyd's building

Lloyds Building1, Lime Streeta dedicated building
The Lloyd's building, headquarters for Lloyd's of London, was built on the site of the former East India House.
It is located on the former site of East India House in Lime Street, in London's main financial district, the City of London.

Leadenhall Street

Leadenhall65-68 Leadenhall StreetLeadenhall-Street
It was located in Leadenhall Street in the City of London.
The street was home to East India House from 1729 until its demolition in 1861; that site is now occupied by Lloyd's of London.

Theodore Jacobsen

The new building was designed by the merchant and amateur architect Theodore Jacobsen.
In the period 1726–9 Jacobsen rebuilt East India House in the Doric order, which took on the form it presented for the rest of the 18th century.

East India Company

British East India CompanyHonourable East India CompanyEnglish East India Company
East India House was the London headquarters of the East India Company, from which much of British India was governed until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India in 1858.
The company's headquarters in London, from which much of India was governed, was East India House in Leadenhall Street.

William Craven (Lord Mayor of London)

Sir William CravenWilliam CravenCraven
In 1648, therefore, it took a lease on the adjoining property, Craven House, a late Elizabethan mansion built by Sir Robert Lee, Lord Mayor of London, and named after one of his successors, Sir William Craven, who had occupied it at a later date.
This house was on the south side of Leadenhall Street; it was leased to the East India Company in 1620 and pulled down, and the East India House erected in 1726.

John James (architect)

John James
The professional architect on site was John James.
He was the professional on site for the construction of East India House, Leadenhall Street, London, to designs by the merchant and amateur architect Theodore Jacobsen, 1726–29.

India Museum

The Company's museum
The Company's museum was housed in one extension, the library in the other.
The museum, of the East India Company, was established in 1801, in East India House in Leadenhall Street, London.

John Boson

Carvings in the interiors were carried out by John Boson.
He did not neglect the secular and domestic market and he is recorded as a worker at East India House, Leadenhall Street in 1730; this time with a partner named John How.

Spiridione Roma

Spiridone Roma
An oval ceiling painting for the Revenue Committee Room, The East Offering Its Riches To Britannia, was painted by a little-known Greek artist Spiridone Roma in 1778.
He is best known for an allegorical ceiling piece, The East Offering its Riches to Britannia (1778), commissioned by the East India Company for the Revenue Committee Room in the East India House in London.

India Office

British governmentIndiaSecretary of State
The East India Company was wound up in 1858, when its assets passed to the government; and the building became the India Office.
Throughout most of these changes the basic structure of Company organisation in East India House in the City of London remained largely unaltered, comprising a large body of proprietors or shareholders and an elected Court of Directors, headed by a chairman and deputy chairman who, aided by permanent officials, were responsible for the daily conduct of Company business.

Henry Holland (architect)

Henry HollandHenry Holland Jnr.Henry Holland the architect
Designs to extend and reface the building were commissioned, after some canvassing among John Soane and George Dance, from Henry Holland – though even then the Company's Surveyor, architect Richard Jupp, insisted on overseeing construction.
In 1796 Holland received the commission to design the new headquarters for the East India Company, East India House in Leadenhall Street.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
East India House was the London headquarters of the East India Company, from which much of British India was governed until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India in 1858.

Presidencies and provinces of British India

British IndiaIndiaBritish
East India House was the London headquarters of the East India Company, from which much of British India was governed until the British government took control of the Company's possessions in India in 1858.

City of London

CityLondonthe City
It was located in Leadenhall Street in the City of London.

Lloyd's of London

LloydLloyds of LondonLloyds
The Lloyd's building, headquarters for Lloyd's of London, was built on the site of the former East India House.

Thomas Smythe

Sir Thomas SmithSir Thomas SmytheThomas Smith
Until 1621, it occupied rooms in the mansion of its Governor, Sir Thomas Smythe, in Philpot Lane, Fenchurch Street; and from 1621 to 1638 it was housed in Crosby House, Bishopsgate.

Philpot Lane

Philipot Lane
Until 1621, it occupied rooms in the mansion of its Governor, Sir Thomas Smythe, in Philpot Lane, Fenchurch Street; and from 1621 to 1638 it was housed in Crosby House, Bishopsgate.

Fenchurch Street

Fenchurch
Until 1621, it occupied rooms in the mansion of its Governor, Sir Thomas Smythe, in Philpot Lane, Fenchurch Street; and from 1621 to 1638 it was housed in Crosby House, Bishopsgate.

Crosby Hall, London

Crosby HallCrosby PlaceCrosby House
Until 1621, it occupied rooms in the mansion of its Governor, Sir Thomas Smythe, in Philpot Lane, Fenchurch Street; and from 1621 to 1638 it was housed in Crosby House, Bishopsgate.

Bishopsgate

Bishopsgate StreetBishopsgate WithoutBishopgate
Until 1621, it occupied rooms in the mansion of its Governor, Sir Thomas Smythe, in Philpot Lane, Fenchurch Street; and from 1621 to 1638 it was housed in Crosby House, Bishopsgate.

Christopher Clitherow

Sir Christopher Clitherow
In 1638 it moved into the house of its new Governor, Sir Christopher Clitherow, in Leadenhall Street.

Elizabethan architecture

ElizabethanElizabethan styleElizabethan-style
In 1648, therefore, it took a lease on the adjoining property, Craven House, a late Elizabethan mansion built by Sir Robert Lee, Lord Mayor of London, and named after one of his successors, Sir William Craven, who had occupied it at a later date.

Robert Lee (Lord Mayor)

Sir Robert LeeRobert Lee
In 1648, therefore, it took a lease on the adjoining property, Craven House, a late Elizabethan mansion built by Sir Robert Lee, Lord Mayor of London, and named after one of his successors, Sir William Craven, who had occupied it at a later date.

Lord Mayor of London

Lord Mayor of the City of LondonLord MayorMayor of London
In 1648, therefore, it took a lease on the adjoining property, Craven House, a late Elizabethan mansion built by Sir Robert Lee, Lord Mayor of London, and named after one of his successors, Sir William Craven, who had occupied it at a later date.