Eastern Europe

EasternEastern EuropeanEast EuropeanEastCentral-Eastern EuropeEastern European countriesEastern-EuropeanEast EuropeEast European countriesEast-European
Eastern Europe is the eastern part of the European continent.wikipedia
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Russia

🇷🇺RUSRussian
One definition describes Eastern Europe as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences. Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance. Russia is a transcontinental country where the Western part is in Eastern Europe and the Eastern part is in Northern Asia. Parts of the Balkans and more northern areas were ruled by the Achaemenid Persians as well, including Thrace, Paeonia, Macedon, and most of the Black Sea coastal regions of Romania, Ukraine, and Russia.
Russia, officially the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country in Eastern Europe and North Asia.

Cold War

the Cold Warcold-warCold War era
Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc. Another definition was used during the 40 years of Cold War between 1947 and 1989, and was more or less synonymous with the terms Eastern Bloc and Warsaw Pact.
A common historiography of the conflict begins with 1946, the year U.S. diplomat George F. Kennan's "Long Telegram" from Moscow cemented a U.S. foreign policy of containment of Soviet expansionism threatening strategically vital regions, and ending between the Revolutions of 1989 and the 1991 collapse of the USSR, which ended communism in Eastern Europe.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
A similar definition names the formerly communist European states outside the Soviet Union as Eastern Europe.
Extending across the entirety of Northern Asia and much of Eastern Europe, the Soviet Union had spanned eleven time zones and incorporated a wide range of environments and landforms.

Eastern Christianity

Eastern ChristianEasternEastern Churches
One definition describes Eastern Europe as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.
Eastern Christianity consists of the Christian traditions and churches that developed distinctively over several centuries in the Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe, Asia Minor, the Malabar coast of South India, and parts of the Far East.

Belarus

🇧🇾BLRBelarusian
Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance.
Belarus, officially the Republic of Belarus, formerly known by its Russian name Byelorussia or Belorussia, is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe bordered by Russia to the northeast, Ukraine to the south, Poland to the west, and Lithuania and Latvia to the northwest.

Moldova

🇲🇩Republic of MoldovaMDA
Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance.
Moldova (, sometimes), officially the Republic of Moldova (Republica Moldova), is a landlocked country in Eastern Europe, bordered by Romania to the west and Ukraine to the north, east, and south.

Romania

🇷🇴ROURomanian
Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance. Parts of the Balkans and more northern areas were ruled by the Achaemenid Persians as well, including Thrace, Paeonia, Macedon, and most of the Black Sea coastal regions of Romania, Ukraine, and Russia.
Romania (România ) is a country located at the crossroads of Central, Eastern, and Southeastern Europe.

Ukraine

🇺🇦UkrainianUKR
Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance. Parts of the Balkans and more northern areas were ruled by the Achaemenid Persians as well, including Thrace, Paeonia, Macedon, and most of the Black Sea coastal regions of Romania, Ukraine, and Russia.
Ukraine ({{lang-uk|Україна|Ukrayina}}; {{IPA-uk|ukrɑˈjinɑ}}), sometimes called the Ukraine, is a country in Eastern Europe.

Germany

🇩🇪GermanGER
Western Europe according to this point of view is formed by countries with dominant Roman Catholic and Protestant churches (including Central European countries like Austria, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Poland, and Slovakia).
From southern Scandinavia and north Germany, they expanded south, east and west from the 1st century BC, coming into contact with the Celtic tribes of Gaul as well as Iranian, Baltic, and Slavic tribes in Central and Eastern Europe.

Continent

continentssubcontinentcontinental
Eastern Europe is the eastern part of the European continent.
The six-continent combined-Eurasia model is mostly used in Russia, Eastern Europe, and Japan.

Azerbaijan

🇦🇿Republic of AzerbaijanAzerbaijani
The Caucasus nations of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia are included in definitions or histories of Eastern Europe.
Azerbaijan (Azərbaycan ), officially the Republic of Azerbaijan (Azərbaycan Respublikası ), is a landlocked country in the South Caucasus region of Eurasia at the crossroads of Eastern Europe and Western Asia.

Georgia (country)

GeorgiaGeorgianRepublic of Georgia
The Caucasus nations of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia are included in definitions or histories of Eastern Europe.
Located at the crossroads of Western Asia and Eastern Europe, it is bounded to the west by the Black Sea, to the north by Russia, to the south by Turkey and Armenia, and to the southeast by Azerbaijan.

Boundaries between the continents of Earth

boundary between Europe and Asiaborder between Europe and Asiacontinental boundaries
The Caucasus nations of Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Georgia are included in definitions or histories of Eastern Europe. The Ural Mountains, Ural River, and the Caucasus Mountains are the geographical land border of the eastern edge of Europe.
listed as part of Eastern Europe: Russian Federation

European Russia

Central Russiawestern RussiaEuropean part
Russia is a transcontinental country where the Western part is in Eastern Europe and the Eastern part is in Northern Asia.
European Russia, the western part of the Russian Federation, is a part of Eastern Europe.

North Asia

northern AsiaNorthernNorth
Russia is a transcontinental country where the Western part is in Eastern Europe and the Eastern part is in Northern Asia.
North Asia is bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean, to the west by Eastern Europe, to the south by Central and East Asia, and to the east by the Pacific Ocean and North America.

Central Europe

CentralCentral Europeanmiddle Europe
Croatia (can variously be included in Southeastern or Central Europe)
It is said to occupy continuous territory that are otherwise conventionally Western Europe, Southern Europe, and Eastern Europe.

Communism

communistcommunistscommunist ideology
A similar definition names the formerly communist European states outside the Soviet Union as Eastern Europe.
saw the emergence of the Soviet Union as a superpower, with strong influence over Eastern Europe and parts of Asia. The European and Japanese empires were shattered and communist parties played a leading role in many independence movements. Marxist–Leninist governments modeled on the Soviet Union took power with Soviet assistance in Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Poland, Hungary and Romania. A Marxist–Leninist government was also created under Marshal Tito in Yugoslavia, but Tito's independent policies led to the expulsion of Yugoslavia from the Cominform which had replaced the Comintern and Titoism was branded "deviationist". Albania also became an independent Marxist–Leninist state after World War II. Communism was seen as a rival of and a threat to western capitalism for most of the 20th century.

Warsaw Pact

Soviet blocWarsaw TreatyEastern Bloc
Another definition was used during the 40 years of Cold War between 1947 and 1989, and was more or less synonymous with the terms Eastern Bloc and Warsaw Pact.
The strategy behind the formation of the Warsaw Pact was driven by the desire of the Soviet Union to dominate Central and Eastern Europe.

Achaemenid Empire

PersianPersian EmpireAchaemenid
These kingdoms were either from the start, or later on incorporated into various Iranian empires, including the Achaemenid Persian, Parthian, and Sassanid Persian Empires. Parts of the Balkans and more northern areas were ruled by the Achaemenid Persians as well, including Thrace, Paeonia, Macedon, and most of the Black Sea coastal regions of Romania, Ukraine, and Russia.
Ranging at its greatest extent from the Balkans and Eastern Europe proper in the west to the Indus Valley in the east, it was larger than any previous empire in history, spanning 5.5 (or 8 ) million square kilometers.

Euronest Parliamentary Assembly

Euronest PAParliamentary Assembly
They participate in the European Union's Eastern Partnership program, the Euronest Parliamentary Assembly, and are members of the Council of Europe, which specifies that all three have political and cultural connections to Europe.
In addition to the 28 member states of the European Parliament, 4 Eastern European states participate:

Greeks

GreekHellenesHellenic
One definition describes Eastern Europe as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.
Another highly recognizable and popular Greek symbol is the double-headed eagle, the imperial emblem of the last dynasty of the Eastern Roman Empire and a common symbol in Asia Minor and, later, Eastern Europe.

Black Sea

BlackPonticEuxine Sea
Parts of the Balkans and more northern areas were ruled by the Achaemenid Persians as well, including Thrace, Paeonia, Macedon, and most of the Black Sea coastal regions of Romania, Ukraine, and Russia.
The Black Sea is a body of water and marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean between the Balkans, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Western Asia.

Caucasus

CaucasianCaucasiathe Caucasus
Owing to the rivalry between Parthian Iran and Rome, and later Byzantium and the Sassanid Persians, the former would invade the region several times, although it was never able to hold the region, unlike the Sassanids who ruled over most of the Caucasus during their entire rule.
It is home to the Caucasus Mountains including the Greater Caucasus mountain range, which has historically been considered a natural barrier between Eastern Europe and Western Asia, but is today accepted by the majority of scholars as being part of Asia.

Republic of Macedonia

MacedoniaMacedonianFYR Macedonia
Eastern Europe is formed by countries with dominant Eastern Orthodox churches, like Belarus, Bulgaria, Greece, Republic of Macedonia, Moldova, Montenegro, Romania, Russia, Serbia, and Ukraine for instance.
In addition, it faced many of the same problems faced by other former socialist East European countries during the transition to a market economy.

Eastern Orthodox Church

OrthodoxEastern OrthodoxEastern Orthodoxy
Since the Great Schism of 1054, Europe has been divided between Roman Catholic and Protestant churches in the West, and the Eastern Orthodox Christian (many times incorrectly labeled "Greek Orthodox") churches in the east.
As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, the Eastern Orthodox Church has played a prominent role in the history and culture of Eastern and Southeastern Europe, the Caucasus, and the Near East.