Eastern Wei

Dong WeiEastern Wei dynastyEasternDongwei
The Eastern Wei followed the disintegration of the Northern Wei, and ruled northern China from 534 to 550.wikipedia
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Gao Huan

Emperor Shenwu
In 534 Gao Huan, the potentate of the eastern half of what was Northern Wei territory following the disintegration of the Northern Wei dynasty installed Yuan Shanjian a descendant of the Northern Wei as ruler of Eastern Wei.
Gao Huan (496–547), Xianbei name Heliuhun, formally Prince Xianwu of Qi, later further formally honored by Northern Qi initially as Emperor Xianwu, then as Emperor Shenwu with the temple name Gaozu, was the paramount general of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Wei and Northern Wei's branch successor state Eastern Wei.

Northern Wei

Northern Wei DynastyWeiand future dynasties
In 534 Gao Huan, the potentate of the eastern half of what was Northern Wei territory following the disintegration of the Northern Wei dynasty installed Yuan Shanjian a descendant of the Northern Wei as ruler of Eastern Wei. The Eastern Wei followed the disintegration of the Northern Wei, and ruled northern China from 534 to 550.
Towards the end of the dynasty there was significant internal dissension resulting in a split into Eastern Wei and Western Wei.

Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei

Yuan ShanjianEmperor XiaojingXiaojing
In 534 Gao Huan, the potentate of the eastern half of what was Northern Wei territory following the disintegration of the Northern Wei dynasty installed Yuan Shanjian a descendant of the Northern Wei as ruler of Eastern Wei.
Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei (524–552), personal name Yuan Shanjian, was the only emperor of the Eastern Wei – a branch successor state to Northern Wei.

Gao Cheng

Emperor Wen XiangEmperor Wenxiang
His sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang were able to pursue his policy of controlling the emperor, but in 550 Gao Yang deposed Yuan Shanjian and founded his own dynasty, the Northern Qi.
Gao Cheng (521–549), courtesy name Zihui, formally Prince Wenxiang of Bohai, later further posthumously honored by Northern Qi as Emperor Wenxiang with the temple name Shizong, was the paramount official of the Chinese/Xianbei state Eastern Wei, a branch successor state of Northern Wei.

Emperor Wenxuan of Northern Qi

Gao YangEmperor WenxuanWen Xuan Di
His sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang were able to pursue his policy of controlling the emperor, but in 550 Gao Yang deposed Yuan Shanjian and founded his own dynasty, the Northern Qi.
He was the second son of Eastern Wei's paramount general Gao Huan, and the death of his brother and Gao Huan's designated successor Gao Cheng in 549 became the regent of Eastern Wei.

Xianbei

Xianbei languageXianbicolonised by Turkic people
As with Northern Wei, the ruling family of Eastern Wei were members of the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei.
In 534, the Northern Wei split into an Eastern Wei (534-550) and a Western Wei (535-556) after an uprising in the steppes of North China inhabited by Xianbei and other nomadic peoples.

Northern Qi

Northern Qi DynastyBeiqiQi
His sons Gao Cheng and Gao Yang were able to pursue his policy of controlling the emperor, but in 550 Gao Yang deposed Yuan Shanjian and founded his own dynasty, the Northern Qi.
Northern Qi was the successor state of the Chinese/Xianbei state of Eastern Wei and was founded by Emperor Wenxuan.

Western Wei

Western Wei dynasty
Several military campaigns were launched against the neighboring Western Wei in an attempt to reunify the territory once held by the Northern Wei, however these campaigns were not successful, and in 547 Gao Huan died.
Although smaller than the Eastern Wei in territory and population, Western Wei was able to withstand the attacks from the eastern empire.

Book of Wei

Wei ShuWeishuHistory of Wei
The Book of Wei, also known by its Chinese name as the Wei Shu, is a classic Chinese historical text compiled by Wei Shou from 551 to 554, and is an important text describing the history of the Northern Wei and Eastern Wei from 386 to 550.

History of the Northern Dynasties

History of Northern DynastiesBei ShiBeishi
The text contains 100 volumes and covers the period from 386 to 618, the histories of Northern Wei, Western Wei, Eastern Wei, Northern Zhou, Northern Qi, and Sui dynasty.

Greco-Buddhist art

Gandhara artGandharan artGreco-Buddhist
The Buddhist art of the Eastern Wei displays a combination of Greco-Buddhist influences from Gandhara and Central Asia (representations of flying figures holding wreaths, Greek-style folds of the drapery), together with Chinese artistic influences.
Some Eastern Wei statues display Buddhas with elaborate Greek-style robe foldings, and surmounted by flying figures holding a wreath.

Ye (Hebei)

YeYechengYe city
It remained the capital of the Eastern Wei dynasty and the Northern Qi Dynasty until it was razed to the ground in 580, after Yang Jian, founder of the Sui Dynasty, defeated a resistance force led by Yuchi Jiong, which used Ye as a base of operations.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
The Eastern Wei followed the disintegration of the Northern Wei, and ruled northern China from 534 to 550.

Tuoba

Tuoba clanTuòbáTabgach
As with Northern Wei, the ruling family of Eastern Wei were members of the Tuoba clan of the Xianbei.

Gandhara

GandhāraGandharanGandahara
The Buddhist art of the Eastern Wei displays a combination of Greco-Buddhist influences from Gandhara and Central Asia (representations of flying figures holding wreaths, Greek-style folds of the drapery), together with Chinese artistic influences.

Central Asia

Central AsianCentralCentral Asian Republics
The Buddhist art of the Eastern Wei displays a combination of Greco-Buddhist influences from Gandhara and Central Asia (representations of flying figures holding wreaths, Greek-style folds of the drapery), together with Chinese artistic influences.

Zizhi Tongjian

Zhizhi TongjianComprehensive Mirror for Aid in GovernmentGeneral History of China

Hou Jing

Hou HanHou Jing's rebellion against Eastern Wei
Hou Jing (died 552), courtesy name Wanjing, was a general of Northern Wei, Eastern Wei, and Liang, and briefly, after controlling the Liang imperial regime for several years, usurped the Liang throne, establishing a state of Han.

Taiyuan

JinyangTaiyuan, ChinaTaiyuan Prefecture
It was the capital or secondary capital (undefined, undefined) of Zhao, Former Qin, Eastern Wei, Northern Qi, Northern Jin, Later Tang, Later Jin, Later Han, Northern Han.

Zu Ting

Zu Ting's father Zu Ying was a general during Eastern Wei.

Wei Xiaokuan

He first became a prominent general during Western Wei as he defended the fortress of Yubi (玉壁, in modern Yuncheng, Shanxi) against a vastly larger army commanded by rival Eastern Wei's paramount general Gao Huan, and he eventually contributed greatly to the destruction of Eastern Wei's successor state Northern Qi by Northern Zhou.

Yuwen Tai

Emperor WenYu-Wen Tai
In 534, Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei, seeking to assert power independent of the paramount general Gao Huan, fled to Yuwen's domain, and when Gao subsequently proclaimed Emperor Xiaojing of Eastern Wei emperor, a split of Northern Wei was effected, and when Yuwen subsequently poisoned Emperor Xiaowu to death around the new year 535 and declared his cousin Yuan Baoju emperor (as Emperor Wen), the split was formalized, with the part under Gao's and Emperor Xiaojing's control known as Eastern Wei and the part under Yuwen's and Emperor Wen's control known as Western Wei.