Eclipse

eclipsestotal eclipseeclipsingtotalpartialTotalitycoveringEclipse (software)eclipsedin the shadow of Jupiter
An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object is temporarily obscured, either by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer.wikipedia
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Eclipse season

eclipse seasonsseason
For the special cases of solar and lunar eclipses, these only happen during an "eclipse season", the two times of each year when the plane of the Earth's orbit around the Sun crosses with the plane of the Moon's orbit around the Earth.
An eclipse season is one of only two periods during each year when eclipses can occur, due to the variation in the orbital inclination of the Moon.

Transient astronomical event

transientastronomical eventastronomical transient
An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object is temporarily obscured, either by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer.
Singularly, the term is used for violent deep-sky events, such as supernovae, novae, dwarf nova outbursts, gamma-ray bursts, and tidal disruption events, as well as gravitational microlensing, transits and eclipses.

Eclipse cycle

eclipsestetradeclipse cycles
An eclipse cycle takes place when eclipses in a series are separated by a certain interval of time.
Eclipses may occur repeatedly, separated by certain intervals of time: these intervals are called eclipse cycles.

Saros (astronomy)

Saros cycleSarosSeries
A particular instance is the saros, which results in a repetition of a solar or lunar eclipse every 6,585.3 days, or a little over 18 years.
The saros is a period of exactly 223 synodic months (approximately 6585.3211 days, or 18 years, 11 days, 8 hours), that can be used to predict eclipses of the Sun and Moon.

Syzygy (astronomy)

syzygyplanetary alignmentsyzygies
This alignment of three celestial objects is known as a syzygy.
Solar and lunar eclipses occur at times of syzygy, as do transits and occultations.

Transit (astronomy)

transittransitingtransits
An eclipse is the result of either an occultation (completely hidden) or a transit (partially hidden).
As viewed from a particular vantage point, the transiting body appears to move across the face of the larger body, covering a small portion of it.

Magnitude of eclipse

Mag.magnitudeeclipse magnitude
The eclipse magnitude is the fraction of the Sun's diameter that is covered by the Moon.
The magnitude of eclipse is the fraction of the angular diameter of a celestial body being eclipsed.

Phobos (moon)

PhobosShklovskyÖpik
The same terms may be used analogously in describing other eclipses, e.g., the antumbra of Deimos crossing Mars, or Phobos entering Mars's penumbra.
Phobos is not large enough to cover the Sun's disk, and so cannot cause a total eclipse.

Deimos (moon)

DeimosDeimos moonMars II
The same terms may be used analogously in describing other eclipses, e.g., the antumbra of Deimos crossing Mars, or Phobos entering Mars's penumbra.
It is too small to cause a total eclipse, appearing only as a small black dot moving across the Sun.

Umbra, penumbra and antumbra

umbrapenumbraantumbra
There are three types of lunar eclipses: penumbral, when the Moon crosses only the Earth's penumbra; partial, when the Moon crosses partially into the Earth's umbra; and total, when the Moon crosses entirely into the Earth's umbra.
An observer in the umbra experiences a total eclipse.

Ecliptic

ecliptical orbitsecliptic planeplane of the ecliptic
Because the orbital plane of the Moon is tilted with respect to the orbital plane of the Earth (the ecliptic), eclipses can occur only when the Moon is close to the intersection of these two planes (the nodes).
Because the orbit of the Moon is inclined only about 5.145° to the ecliptic and the Sun is always very near the ecliptic, eclipses always occur on or near it.

Binary star

spectroscopic binaryeclipsing binarybinary
A binary star system can also produce eclipses if the plane of the orbit of its constituent stars intersects the observer's position. The result is a type of extrinsic variable star system called an eclipsing binary.
If a binary star happens to orbit in a plane along our line of sight, its components will eclipse and transit each other; these pairs are called eclipsing binaries, or, together with other binaries that change brightness as they orbit, photometric binaries.

Solar eclipse

solarsolar eclipseseclipse
The term eclipse is most often used to describe either a solar eclipse, when the Moon's shadow crosses the Earth's surface, or a lunar eclipse, when the Moon moves into the Earth's shadow. The type of solar eclipse that happens during each season (whether total, annular, hybrid, or partial) depends on apparent sizes of the Sun and Moon.
In a total eclipse, the disk of the Sun is fully obscured by the Moon.

Orbital node

Nodeascending nodenodes
Because the orbital plane of the Moon is tilted with respect to the orbital plane of the Earth (the ecliptic), eclipses can occur only when the Moon is close to the intersection of these two planes (the nodes).

Ole Rømer

Ole Christensen RømerOlaus RoemerOle Roemer
Ole Rømer deduced that the delay was caused by the time needed for light to travel from Jupiter to the Earth.
Rømer observed immersions at point C from positions F and G, to avoid confusion with eclipses (Io shadowed by Jupiter from C to D) and occultations (Io hidden behind Jupiter at various angles).

Mursili's eclipse

June 24, 1312 BClaunches a campaign
It is now more commonly identified as the one of 24 June 1312 BC, which was visible in totality in northern Anatolia in the afternoon.

Transit of Deimos from Mars

transits of Deimostransit of Deimos
Sun - Deimos - Mars: Transit of Deimos from Mars | Solar eclipses on Mars
The event could also be referred to as a partial eclipse of the Sun by Deimos.

Variable star

variablevariable starsvariability
The result is a type of extrinsic variable star system called an eclipsing binary.
When seen from certain angles, one star may eclipse the other, causing a reduction in brightness.

Astronomical object

celestial bodiescelestial bodycelestial object
An eclipse is an astronomical event that occurs when an astronomical object is temporarily obscured, either by passing into the shadow of another body or by having another body pass between it and the viewer.

Occultation

occultedlunar occultationoccults
An eclipse is the result of either an occultation (completely hidden) or a transit (partially hidden).

Angular diameter

apparent diameterangular sizeapparent size
The type of solar eclipse that happens during each season (whether total, annular, hybrid, or partial) depends on apparent sizes of the Sun and Moon.

Ancient Greek

GreekClassical GreekGr.
The term is derived from the ancient Greek noun ἔκλειψις (ékleipsis), which means "the abandonment", "the downfall", or "the darkening of a heavenly body", which is derived from the verb ἐκλείπω (ekleípō) which means "to abandon", "to darken", or "to cease to exist," a combination of prefix ἐκ- (ek-), from preposition ἐκ (ek), "out," and of verb λείπω (leípō), "to be absent".

Mars

MartianCoordinatesplanet Mars
The same terms may be used analogously in describing other eclipses, e.g., the antumbra of Deimos crossing Mars, or Phobos entering Mars's penumbra.

Earth

Earth's surfaceterrestrialworld
For Earth, on average L is equal to 1.384 km, which is much larger than the Moon's semimajor axis of 3.844 km.

Kilometre

kmkilometerkilometers
For Earth, on average L is equal to 1.384 km, which is much larger than the Moon's semimajor axis of 3.844 km.