Economic vegetarianism

economic
An economic vegetarian is a person who practices vegetarianism from either the philosophical viewpoint that the consumption of meat is expensive, part of a conscious simple living strategy or just because of necessity.wikipedia
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Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
An economic vegetarian is a person who practices vegetarianism from either the philosophical viewpoint that the consumption of meat is expensive, part of a conscious simple living strategy or just because of necessity.
Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference.

Environmental vegetarianism

environmentalenvironmental concernsby being vegetarian
They may be vegetarian for other reasons; and there may be significant overlap between these beliefs (e.g. between economic and environmental vegetarians).
Environmental vegetarianism can be compared with economic vegetarianism.

Simple living

voluntary simplicitysimple lifesimple lifestyle
An economic vegetarian is a person who practices vegetarianism from either the philosophical viewpoint that the consumption of meat is expensive, part of a conscious simple living strategy or just because of necessity.

Vitamin

vitaminsfat-soluble vitaminsfat-soluble vitamin
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

Dietary fiber

fiberdietary fibresoluble fiber
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

Carbohydrate

carbohydratessaccharidecomplex carbohydrates
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

Cardiovascular disease

heart diseasecardiac diseaseheart condition
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

Obesity

obesemorbidly obeseoverweight
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

Pathogenic bacteria

bacterial infectionbacterial infectionsbacterial
They argue that a vegetarian diet is rich in vitamins, dietary fiber, and complex carbohydrates, and carries with it fewer risks (such as heart disease, obesity, and bacterial infection) than animal flesh.

United Kingdom

British🇬🇧UK
For example, in the United Kingdom, necessity changed dietary habits during the period around World War II and the early 1950s, as animal products were strictly rationed and allotment or home-grown fruit and vegetables were readily available.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
For example, in the United Kingdom, necessity changed dietary habits during the period around World War II and the early 1950s, as animal products were strictly rationed and allotment or home-grown fruit and vegetables were readily available.

Rationing in the United Kingdom

rationingfood rationingrationed
For example, in the United Kingdom, necessity changed dietary habits during the period around World War II and the early 1950s, as animal products were strictly rationed and allotment or home-grown fruit and vegetables were readily available.

Allotment (gardening)

allotmentallotmentsallotment gardens
For example, in the United Kingdom, necessity changed dietary habits during the period around World War II and the early 1950s, as animal products were strictly rationed and allotment or home-grown fruit and vegetables were readily available.

Victory garden

Dig for VictoryVictory Gardensdigging for victory
For example, in the United Kingdom, necessity changed dietary habits during the period around World War II and the early 1950s, as animal products were strictly rationed and allotment or home-grown fruit and vegetables were readily available.

Developing country

developing countriesdeveloping worlddeveloping nations
In developing countries people sometimes follow a mainly vegetarian diet simply because meat resources are scarce or expensive compared to alternative food sources.

Cultured meat

in vitro meatclean meatIn vitro'' meat
Some promote the idea of synthetic and cloned meat.

Cloning

cloneclonescloned
Some promote the idea of synthetic and cloned meat.

Fruitarianism

fruitarianfruitariansFruitarian diet
Fruitarianism may be adopted for different reasons, including ethical, religious, environmental, cultural, economic, and health.

Semi-vegetarianism

flexitariansemi-vegetarianFlexitarianism
Common reasons for adopting a semi-vegetarian diet may be ethical issues relating to animal welfare (including health) or animal rights, the environment (see environmental vegetarianism) or reducing resource use (see economic vegetarianism), which are also arguments in favor of adopting a fully vegetarian diet.

Environmental impact of meat production

animal agriculturedetrimental environmental effects of meat productionenvironmental
Economic vegetarianism

Ethics of eating meat

ethicalethical vegetarianeating meat
Economic vegetarianism