Edgar Dewdney

Dewdney
Edgar Dewdney, (November 5, 1835 – August 8, 1916) was a Canadian surveyor, road builder, Indian commissioner and politician born in Devonshire, England.wikipedia
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North-West Rebellion

Northwest RebellionRiel RebellionNorth West Rebellion
Additionally, as Indian Commissioner, Dewdney subsequently tackled issues pertaining to the North-West Rebellion of 1885.
Although he quietly signalled to Ottawa that these two incidents were the result of desperate and starving people and were, as such, unrelated to the rebellion, Edgar Dewdney, the lieutenant-governor of the territories, publicly claimed that the Cree and the Métis had joined forces.

Regina, Saskatchewan

ReginaRegina, SKCity of Regina
Perhaps his most notable decision in office was changing the territorial capital from Battleford to Wascana — Cree for "Pile of Bones" — in 1883: a featureless location without water apart from a short spring run-off Wascana Creek, trees or topography.
Regina was established as the territorial seat of government in 1882 when Edgar Dewdney, the lieutenant-governor of the North-West Territories, insisted on the site over the better developed Battleford, Troy and Fort Qu'Appelle (the latter some 30 mi to the east, one on rolling plains and the other in the Qu'Appelle Valley between two lakes).

List of lieutenant governors of the Northwest Territories

Lieutenant Governor of the North-West TerritoriesLieutenant Governor of the Northwest TerritoriesLieutenant Governor
Dewdney served as Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories from 1879 to 1888, and the fifth Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia from 1892 to 1897.

Dewdney Trail

He emigrated to British Columbia in 1859 in order to act as surveyor for the Dewdney Trail that runs through the province.
Overseeing the trail's construction was Edgar Dewdney, a Devonshire-born engineer.

Qu'Appelle, Saskatchewan

Qu'AppelleQu’AppelleTroy
Other townsites were also considered probable territorial capitals, including Fort Qu'Appelle and Qu'Appelle, the latter to the extent of having been designated the cathedral city of the new Diocese of Qu'Appelle by the Church of England in Canada.
Political events, however, passed Qu'Appelle entirely by when Lieutenant-Governor Edgar Dewdney selected the locale of his own landholdings at Pile-O-Bones (then renamed "Regina" by Princess Louise, daughter of Queen Victoria, when her husband John Campbell, Marquess of Lorne was Governor General) as his Territorial capital: Qu'Appelle's significance other than in historical terms then largely lapsed.

Fort Qu'Appelle

Fort Qu'Appelle, SaskatchewanFile Hills Qu'Appelle Tribal CouncilFort Qu’Appelle
Other townsites were also considered probable territorial capitals, including Fort Qu'Appelle and Qu'Appelle, the latter to the extent of having been designated the cathedral city of the new Diocese of Qu'Appelle by the Church of England in Canada.
But it has been alleged to have been corruption on the part of Edgar Dewdney when he was Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West Territories to place the capital in Buffalo Bones rather than Fort Qu'Appelle or Qu'Appelle.

Diocese of Qu'Appelle

Bishop of Qu'AppelleQu'AppelleAnglican Diocese of Qu'Appelle
Other townsites were also considered probable territorial capitals, including Fort Qu'Appelle and Qu'Appelle, the latter to the extent of having been designated the cathedral city of the new Diocese of Qu'Appelle by the Church of England in Canada.
The Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West(sic)Territories, Edgar Dewdney, had acquired substantial landholdings adjacent to the future route of the Canadian Pacific Railway at Oscana—the Cree word meaning "pile of bones" in reference to the plains bison bones scattered around Wascana Creek before the area was populated by non-indigenous people.

Government House (Saskatchewan)

Government HouseGovernment House of SaskatchewanGovernment House of the North-West Territories
The 1883 predecessor had been assembled shortly after the decision of the North-West Territories Lieutenant-Governor Edgar Dewdney to relocate the capital from Battleford.

Leif Newry Fitzroy Crozier

Leif CrozierL.N.F. CrozierMajor Crozier
The North-West Mounted Police Superintendent L.N.F. Crozier acted as an informant for Dewdney in the events leading up to the outbreak of the rebellion.
He warned Lieutenant-Governor Edgar Dewdney that government policies were creating unrest among the First Nations and Métis.

Louis Riel

RielexecutionRiel Rebellions
Metis leader, Louis Riel and the Metis forwarded their demands to Ottawa in 1884.
Also, in response to bribes by territorial lieutenant-governor and Indian commissioner Edgar Dewdney, local English-language newspapers adopted an editorial stance critical of Riel.

Last Mountain Lake Bird Sanctuary

Last Mountain Lake NWA
In 1887, Lieutenant-Governor of the North-West Territories Edgar Dewdney recommended the establishment of an area to protect wild fowl.

Dewdney, British Columbia

Dewdney
The Dewdney Trunk Road, or Dewdney Trunk as it is often called, should not be confused with the Dewdney Trail, which is a colonial-era route from Hope to the East Kootenay region built by Edgar Dewdney.

Canadians

CanadianCanadian citizensCanada
Edgar Dewdney, (November 5, 1835 – August 8, 1916) was a Canadian surveyor, road builder, Indian commissioner and politician born in Devonshire, England.

Devon

DevonshireDevon, EnglandCounty of Devon
Edgar Dewdney, (November 5, 1835 – August 8, 1916) was a Canadian surveyor, road builder, Indian commissioner and politician born in Devonshire, England.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
Edgar Dewdney, (November 5, 1835 – August 8, 1916) was a Canadian surveyor, road builder, Indian commissioner and politician born in Devonshire, England.

Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia

Lieutenant-Governor of British ColumbiaLieutenant GovernorLieutenant-Governor
Dewdney served as Lieutenant Governor of the North-West Territories from 1879 to 1888, and the fifth Lieutenant-Governor of British Columbia from 1892 to 1897.

John A. Macdonald

Sir John A. MacdonaldJohn Alexander MacdonaldMacdonald
After a few years in Provincial politics, Prime Minister Sir John A. Macdonald requested Dewdney to become the Indian Commissioner in the North-West, as he knew of the “Indians” in the area quite well.

Canadian Pacific Railway

Canadian PacificCPRCP Rail
As a result, Dewdney suggested the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) should be built from Midway to Princeton, then north to Merritt and Spences Bridge, and have Fraser Canyon as the way through the Cascades.