Edgar F. Codd

E. F. CoddE.F. CoddCoddEdgar CoddTed CoddCodd, Edgar F.Dr E. F. CoddEdgar "Ted" CoddEdgar Frank CoddTedd Codd
Edgar Frank "Ted" Codd (19 August 1923 – 18 April 2003) was an English computer scientist who, while working for IBM, invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases and relational database management systems.wikipedia
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Relational model

relationalrelational data modelrelationships
Edgar Frank "Ted" Codd (19 August 1923 – 18 April 2003) was an English computer scientist who, while working for IBM, invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases and relational database management systems.
The relational model (RM) for database management is an approach to managing data using a structure and language consistent with first-order predicate logic, first described in 1969 by English computer scientist Edgar F. Codd, where all data is represented in terms of tuples, grouped into relations.

Relational database

relational database management systemRDBMSrelational databases
Edgar Frank "Ted" Codd (19 August 1923 – 18 April 2003) was an English computer scientist who, while working for IBM, invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases and relational database management systems.
A relational database is a digital database based on the relational model of data, as proposed by E. F. Codd in 1970.

Database

database management systemdatabasesDBMS
Edgar Frank "Ted" Codd (19 August 1923 – 18 April 2003) was an English computer scientist who, while working for IBM, invented the relational model for database management, the theoretical basis for relational databases and relational database management systems.
The relational model, first proposed in 1970 by Edgar F. Codd, departed from this tradition by insisting that applications should search for data by content, rather than by following links.

Poole Grammar School

Poole
After attending Poole Grammar School, he studied mathematics and chemistry at Exeter College, Oxford, before serving as a pilot in the RAF Coastal Command during the Second World War, flying Sunderlands.

Turing Award

ACM Turing AwardA.M. Turing AwardA. M. Turing Award
Codd received the Turing Award in 1981, and in 1994 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery.

IBM Research – Almaden

IBM Almaden Research CenterAlmaden Research CenterIBM Research - Almaden
Two years later he moved to San Jose, California, to work at IBM's San Jose Research Laboratory, where he continued to work until the 1980s.
The following are some of the famous scientists who have worked in the past or are currently working in this laboratory: Rakesh Agrawal, Rama Akkiraju, John Backus, Raymond F. Boyce, Donald D. Chamberlin, Ashok K. Chandra, Edgar F. Codd, Mark Dean, Cynthia Dwork, Don Eigler, Ronald Fagin, Jim Gray, Laura M. Haas, Joseph Halpern, Andreas J. Heinrich, Reynold B. Johnson, Maria Klawe, Jaishankar Menon, Dharmendra Modha, William E. Moerner, C. Mohan, Stuart Parkin, Nick Pippenger, Dan Russell, Patricia Selinger, Ted Selker, Barbara Simons, Malcolm Slaney, Ramakrishnan Srikant, Larry Stockmeyer, Moshe Vardi, Jennifer Widom, Shumin Zhai.

Larry Ellison

Melanie CraftExecutive Chairman of the Board and CTO, Larry EllisonLarry
Even so, SEQUEL was so superior to pre-relational systems that it was copied, in 1979, based on pre-launch papers presented at conferences, by Larry Ellison, of Relational Software Inc, in his Oracle Database, which actually reached market before SQL/DS – because of the then-already proprietary status of the original name, SEQUEL had been renamed SQL.
While working at Ampex in the early 1970s, he became influenced by Edgar F. Codd's research on relational database design, which led in 1977 to the formation of what became Oracle.

Codd's cellular automaton

Codd's automatonhisHis design for a self-replicating computer
His design for a self-replicating computer was only implemented in 2010.
Codd's cellular automaton is a cellular automaton (CA) devised by the British computer scientist Edgar F. Codd in 1968.

Alpha (programming language)

AlphaData Sub-Language ALPHADSL/Alpha
As a result, they did not use Codd's own Alpha language but created a non-relational one, SEQUEL.
The Alpha language was the original database language proposed by Edgar F. Codd, the inventor of the relational database approach.

Fortuneswell

Regal Cinema
Edgar Frank Codd was born in Fortuneswell, on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England.
*Edgar F. Codd, invented relational model for databases while working for IBM.

SQL

Structured Query LanguageSQL databaseSQL Databases
Even so, SEQUEL was so superior to pre-relational systems that it was copied, in 1979, based on pre-launch papers presented at conferences, by Larry Ellison, of Relational Software Inc, in his Oracle Database, which actually reached market before SQL/DS – because of the then-already proprietary status of the original name, SEQUEL had been renamed SQL.
SQL was one of the first commercial languages to utilize Edgar F. Codd’s relational model.

Relational algebra

joinJoin (relational algebra)relational logic
Codd's theorem, a result proven in his seminal work on the relational model, equates the expressive power of relational algebra and relational calculus (both of which, lacking recursion, are strictly less powerful than first-order logic).
Relational algebra, first created by Edgar F. Codd while at IBM, is a family of algebras with a well-founded semantics used for modelling the data stored in relational databases, and defining queries on it.

Isle of Portland

PortlandPortland, DorsetPortland, England
Edgar Frank Codd was born in Fortuneswell, on the Isle of Portland in Dorset, England.

Database normalization

normalizationnormalizednormal form
One of the normalised forms, the Boyce–Codd normal form, is named after him.
It was first proposed by Edgar F. Codd as part of his relational model.

University of Michigan

MichiganUniversity of Michigan, Ann ArborUniversity of Michigan at Ann Arbor
In 1957 he returned to the US working for IBM and from 1961–1965 pursuing his doctorate in computer science at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor.
Several U-M graduates contributed greatly to the field of computer science, including Claude Shannon (who made major contributions to the mathematics of information theory), and Turing Award winners Edgar Codd, Stephen Cook, Frances E. Allen and Michael Stonebraker.

Boyce–Codd normal form

BCNFBoyce-Codd normal formBoyce Codd Normal Form
One of the normalised forms, the Boyce–Codd normal form, is named after him.
BCNF was developed in 1974 by Raymond F. Boyce and Edgar F. Codd to address certain types of anomalies not dealt with by 3NF as originally defined.

Codd's theorem

Codd's theorem, a result proven in his seminal work on the relational model, equates the expressive power of relational algebra and relational calculus (both of which, lacking recursion, are strictly less powerful than first-order logic).
The theorem is named after Edgar F. Codd, the father of the relational model for database management.

SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award

ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations AwardSIGMOD Edward Codd Innovations Award
In 2004, SIGMOD renamed its highest prize to the SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award, in his honour.
The ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award is a lifetime research achievement award given by the ACM Special Interest Group on Management of Data, at its yearly flagship conference (also called SIGMOD).

Codd's 12 rules

the relational model as described by Codd12 rulestwelve rules
As part of this campaign, he published his 12 rules to define what constituted a relational database.
Codd's twelve rules are a set of thirteen rules (numbered zero to twelve) proposed by Edgar F. Codd, a pioneer of the relational model for databases, designed to define what is required from a database management system in order for it to be considered relational, i.e., a relational database management system (RDBMS).

Relational Model/Tasmania

Relational Model/Tasmania (RM/T) was published by Edgar F. Codd in 1979 and is the name given to a number of extensions to his original relational model (RM) published in 1970.

Christopher J. Date

Chris DateC. J. DateC.J. Date
Codd continued to develop and extend his relational model, sometimes in collaboration with Christopher J. Date.
He was also involved with Edgar F. Codd’s relational model for database management.

John Henry Holland

John HollandJohn H. HollandHolland
Codd received a PhD in 1965 from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor advised by John Henry Holland.

List of pioneers in computer science

computer pioneerfather of the computerList of prominent pioneers in computer science

SIGMOD

ACM SIGMODACM SIGMOD ConferenceSIGMOD Conference
In 2004, SIGMOD renamed its highest prize to the SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award, in his honour.
The most important of these is the SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award (named after the computer scientist Edgar F. Codd), which is awarded to "innovative and highly significant contributions of enduring value to the development, understanding, or use of database systems and databases".