Edmond-Charles Genêt

Citizen GenetEdmond-Charles GenetCitizen GenêtCitizen Genet AffairCitizen Genêt AffairCitoyen GenêtEdmond Charles GenêtGenêt
Edmond-Charles Genêt (January 8, 1763 – July 14, 1834), also known as Citizen Genêt, was the French envoy to the United States during the French Revolution.wikipedia
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List of ambassadors of France to Russia

French Ambassador to RussiaAmbassador of France to Russiaambassador to Russia
At 18, Genêt was appointed court translator, and in 1788 he was sent to the French embassy in Saint Petersburg to serve as ambassador.

Henriette Campan

Madame CampanJeanne-Louise-Henriette CampanJeanne Campan
His eldest sister was Jeanne-Louise-Henriette Campan, who became an educator and author.
Her father was the highest-ranking clerk in the foreign office (the ambassador Citizen Genet was her younger brother), and, although without fortune, placed her in the most cultivated society.

Embuscade (1789)

EmbuscadeHMS ''SeineSeine
Genêt arrived in Charleston, South Carolina on the French frigate Embuscade on April 8.
In 1792, she escorted convoys to and from Martinique, and ferried Edmond-Charles Genêt to the United States.

Michel Ney

Marshal NeyNeyMarshall Ney
Aglaé-Louise Auguié (1782-1854), who was the wife of Marshal Ney of France, was Genêt's niece.

Tammany Hall

TammanyTammany SocietySociety of St. Tammany
He was also hosted by the Democratic-Republican society, the Tammany Society, in 1793.
The Society assisted the federal government in procuring a peace treaty with the Creek Indians of Georgia and Florida at the request of George Washington in 1790 and also hosted Edmond-Charles Genêt in 1793, representative of the New French Republic after the French Revolution toppled the old regime.

Federalist Party

FederalistFederalistsF
Washington sent Genêt an 8,000-word letter of complaint on Jefferson's and Hamilton's advice – one of the few situations in which the Federalist Alexander Hamilton and the Republican Jefferson agreed.
In 1793, Paris sent a new minister, Edmond-Charles Genêt (known as Citizen Genêt), who systematically mobilized pro-French sentiment and encouraged Americans to support France's war against Britain and Spain.

Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonian
When turned down by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson and informed that his actions were unacceptable, Genêt protested.
Jefferson supported France against Britain when the two nations fought in 1793, though his arguments in the Cabinet were undercut by French Revolutionary envoy Edmond-Charles Genêt's open scorn for President Washington.

Michel Ange Bernard Mangourit

Michel Ange Bernard de Mangourit
Working with French consul Michel Ange Bernard Mangourit, Genêt organized American volunteers to fight Britain's Spanish allies in Florida.
He worked with the arrival of Ambassador Edmond-Charles Genêt.

George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonGeneral George Washington
Instead of traveling to the then-capital of Philadelphia to present himself to U.S. President George Washington for accreditation, Genêt stayed in South Carolina.
The revolutionary government of France sent diplomat Citizen Genêt to America, and he was welcomed with great enthusiasm.

East Greenbush, New York

East GreenbushGreenbushGreenbush, New York
Genêt lived on a farm he called Prospect Hill located in East Greenbush, New York overlooking the Hudson River.
In the late 18th century until his death in 1834, Prospect Hill on Hays Road in the southern section of the town was home to Edmond-Charles Genêt, former adjutant-general, minister plenipotentiary, and consul-general to the United States representing France; and as an American citizen he was a New York state legislator from Rensselaer County and a major-general in the state militia.

Alexander Hamilton

HamiltonHamiltonianA. Hamilton
Washington sent Genêt an 8,000-word letter of complaint on Jefferson's and Hamilton's advice – one of the few situations in which the Federalist Alexander Hamilton and the Republican Jefferson agreed.
Hamilton's public relations campaign attacked the French minister Edmond-Charles Genêt (he called himself "Citizen Genêt") who tried to appeal to voters directly, which Federalists denounced as foreign interference in American affairs.

Edmond Genet

Edmond Charles Clinton Genet
Edmond Charles Clinton Genet (1896–1917), who served with the Lafayette Escadrille and was the first American flier to die in the First World War after the United States declared war against Germany in 1917, was Genêt's great-grandson.
Genet was the second great-grandson of Edmond-Charles Genêt, the controversial French Ambassador to the United States in 1793.

France–United States relations

Franco-American relationsFrance – United States relationsFrance
* Franco-U.S. relations
The first challenge to U.S. neutrality came from France, when its first diplomatic representative, the brash Edmond-Charles Genêt, toured the United States to organize U.S. expeditions against Spain and Britain.

Democratic-Republican Societies

Democratic Societies
He encouraged Democratic-Republican societies, but President Washington denounced them and they quickly withered away.
The Federalists opposed such groups, saying they had been started by Citizen Genêt as a tool of the revolutionary government in Paris.

George Clinton (vice president)

George ClintonGovernor George ClintonClinton
Genêt married Cornelia Tappen Clinton (1774–1810) in 1794, the daughter of New York Governor George Clinton.

Jean Antoine Joseph Fauchet

He was appointed ambassador to the United States, with orders to arrest Edmond-Charles Genêt.

Jean Baptiste Ternant

After the abolition of the monarchy, he was dismissed by the ruling Girondins from his post and was succeeded by Edmond-Charles Genet.

French Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary FranceRevolutionary
Edmond-Charles Genêt (January 8, 1763 – July 14, 1834), also known as Citizen Genêt, was the French envoy to the United States during the French Revolution.

Right of asylum

political asylumasylumpolitical refugee
Fearing for his life, he asked for asylum in America, which was granted.

Versailles, Yvelines

VersaillesVersailles, FranceVersaille
Genêt was born in Versailles in 1763.

Seven Years' War

Seven Years’ WarSeven Years WarThe Seven Years' War
The elder Genêt analyzed British naval strength during the Seven Years' War and monitored the progress of the American Revolutionary War.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
The elder Genêt analyzed British naval strength during the Seven Years' War and monitored the progress of the American Revolutionary War.

Ancien Régime

ancien regimeOld RegimeAncien Régime in France
Over time, Genêt became disenchanted with the ancien régime, learning to despise not just the French monarchy but all monarchical systems, including Tsarist Russia under Catherine the Great.

Catherine the Great

Catherine IICatherine II of RussiaEmpress Catherine II
Over time, Genêt became disenchanted with the ancien régime, learning to despise not just the French monarchy but all monarchical systems, including Tsarist Russia under Catherine the Great.