Edmond Thieffry

Thieffry
Edmond Thieffry (28 September 1892 – 11 April 1929) was a Belgian First World War air ace and aviation pioneer.wikipedia
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Nieuport 17

Nieuport 23Nieuport Scout17
The 5th Squadron then relocated to Les Moëres, and was equipped with Nieuport 17s.
Belgian aces flying the type included Andre de Meulemeester, Edmond Thieffry and Jan Olieslagers.

SPAD S.VII

Spad VIISPAD 7SPAD S.7
In August he received the first SPAD VII fighter in the Belgian Air Force, bought by the Belgian prince.
Edmond Thieffry was probably the most famous Belgian pilot to fly the type, most other aces preferring the Hanriot HD.1.

Stampe et Vertongen RSV.22

RSV.22RSV.22-180RSV.22-Lynx
The second on 26 June in a Stampe et Vertongen RSV.22-180, again with Philippe Quersin, also failed, this time ending in a marsh at Clapier, near Vauvert.
In 1928, Lt Edmond Thieffry and SLt Philippe Quersin piloted a civil-registered RSV 22/180 (registration O-BAJE) on an attempt at a long-distance flight to Africa.

ACAZ C.2

The first on 9 March 1928 in an ACAZ C.2 with Joseph Lang and Philippe Quersin, did not get any further than Philippeville.
The C.2 was used in a failed aerial expedition by Edmond Thieffry, who with two companions (Joseph Lang and Philippe Quersin), attempted to fly it to Belgian Congo, departing Belgium on 9 March 1928, but only getting as far as Philippeville (Belgium).

Silver Medal of Military Valor

Silver Medal of Military ValourSilver Medals of Military ValourSilver Medals of Military Valor

Thieffry metro station

Thieffry
A metro station (Thieffry metro station) and a street (Rue Aviateur Thieffry / Vlieger Thieffry Straat) have also been named after him in Etterbeek.
The station was opened in 1976 and is named after the Belgian aviator Edmond Thieffry.

Aviméta 92

Aviméta 92-230
During his second test flight in Congo on 11 April 1929, flying an Aviméta 92, Thieffry, with fellow flyer Gaston Julien, was killed in a crash close to Lake Tanganyika (only a mechanic survived).
Both aircraft (registered as OO-AJY and OO-AJZ) were lost in early 1929 due to air crashes, the latter claiming the life of WWI fighter ace Edmond Thieffry and his co-pilot.

Flying ace

fighter aceaceaces
Edmond Thieffry (28 September 1892 – 11 April 1929) was a Belgian First World War air ace and aviation pioneer.

Belgium

BelgianBELKingdom of Belgium
He made, with Léopold Roger and Jef de Bruycker, the first successful flight between Belgium and Congo (then the Belgian Congo).

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of CongoCongoDR Congo
He made, with Léopold Roger and Jef de Bruycker, the first successful flight between Belgium and Congo (then the Belgian Congo).

Belgian Congo

CongoBelgian colonial ruleCongolese
He made, with Léopold Roger and Jef de Bruycker, the first successful flight between Belgium and Congo (then the Belgian Congo).

Etterbeek

Etterbeek, Belgium
Thieffry was born in Etterbeek, a municipality of Brussels, and went on to study law in Leuven (hence his nickname "The Flying Judge").

Brussels

Brussels, BelgiumBrussels-Capital RegionBruxelles
Thieffry was born in Etterbeek, a municipality of Brussels, and went on to study law in Leuven (hence his nickname "The Flying Judge").

KU Leuven

Katholieke Universiteit LeuvenCatholic University of LeuvenUniversity of Leuven
Thieffry was born in Etterbeek, a municipality of Brussels, and went on to study law in Leuven (hence his nickname "The Flying Judge").

Attaché

attachecommercial attachéAttachés
At the start of the First World War he saw service as a staff attaché to General Leman, but was captured by the Germans.

Gérard Leman

Lieutenant General Count Gérard-Mathieu LemanGerard LemanLeman
At the start of the First World War he saw service as a staff attaché to General Leman, but was captured by the Germans.

Internment

concentration campconcentration campsinterned
Using his legal knowledge and Dutch language skills he managed to talk his way out of internment, and travelled to Antwerp to rejoin the Belgian army.

Antwerp

Antwerp, BelgiumAntwerpenAnvers
Using his legal knowledge and Dutch language skills he managed to talk his way out of internment, and travelled to Antwerp to rejoin the Belgian army.

Étampes

EtampesBattle of ĖtampesÉtampes, France
In 1915, Thieffry joined the Compagnie des Ouvriers et Aérostiers —the Belgian Army Air Corps— and with some difficulty qualified as a pilot at Étampes.

De Panne

La PanneDe Panne, Belgium
He was rapidly transferred to 5th Squadron (The Comets) under Captain Jules Dony based at De Panne in December 1916.

Nieuport 11

Nieuport 16Nieuport Delage 11 C-1Nieuport XI
His first confirmed victory was on 15 March 1917, flying a Nieuport 11.

Gistel

GhistellesGhistelGhistelles-Zevecote
His second followed eight days later above Gistel, and his third on 12 May above Houthulst.

Houthulst

Houthulst ForestHouthoulstHouthoulst Forest
His second followed eight days later above Gistel, and his third on 12 May above Houthulst.

Albatros D.III

AlbatrosOeffag D.IIIAlbatros Scout
His fourth was on 14 June—an Albatros D.III above Westende.