Edmund Wilson

Wilson, EdmundEdmund and Elena Wilson
Edmund Wilson (May 8, 1895 – June 12, 1972) was an American writer and critic who explored Freudian and Marxist themes.wikipedia
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F. Scott Fitzgerald

FitzgeraldF. ScottScott Fitzgerald
He influenced many American authors, including F. Scott Fitzgerald, whose unfinished work he edited for publication. Wilson's critical works helped foster public appreciation for several novelists: Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Vladimir Nabokov.
He firmly dedicated himself at Princeton to honing his craft as a writer, and became friends with future critics and writers Edmund Wilson and John Peale Bishop.

Edmund Wilson Sr.

Edmund Wilson
His parents were Helen Mather (née Kimball) and Edmund Wilson Sr., a lawyer who served as New Jersey Attorney General.
He was the father of literary critic Edmund Wilson.

Talcottville, New York

Talcottville
His family's summer home at Talcottville, New York, known as Edmund Wilson House, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
The author and critic Edmund Wilson was a summer resident, and wrote "Upstate: Records and Recollections of Northern New York" (New York: Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1971; reprint, Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, 1990), a memoir of his time in Talcottville.

The New York Review of Books

New York Review of BooksNYRBNew York Review
Wilson was the managing editor of Vanity Fair in 1920 and 1921, and later served as associate editor of The New Republic and as a book reviewer for The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books.
Early issues included articles by such writers as Hardwick, Lowell, Jason Epstein, Hannah Arendt, W. H. Auden, Saul Bellow, John Berryman, Truman Capote, Paul Goodman, Lillian Hellman, Irving Howe, Alfred Kazin, Dwight Macdonald, Norman Mailer, Mary McCarthy, Norman Podhoretz, Philip Rahv, Adrienne Rich, Susan Sontag, William Styron, Gore Vidal, Robert Penn Warren and Edmund Wilson.

Axel's Castle

Axel's Castle: A Study in the Imaginative Literature of 1870–1930
Axel's Castle: A Study in the Imaginative Literature of 1870–1930 (1931) was a sweeping survey of Symbolism.
Axel's Castle: A Study in the Imaginative Literature of 1870–1930 is a 1931 book of literary criticism by Edmund Wilson on the symbolist movement in literature.

To the Finland Station

In his book, To the Finland Station (1940), Wilson studied the course of European socialism, from the 1824 discovery by Jules Michelet of the ideas of Vico culminating in the 1917 arrival of Vladimir Lenin at the Finland Station of Saint Petersburg to lead the Bolsheviks in the Russian Revolution.
To the Finland Station: A Study in the Writing and Acting of History (1940) is a book by American critic and historian Edmund Wilson.

John Dos Passos

Dos Passostrilogy USA
His works influenced novelists Upton Sinclair, John Dos Passos, Sinclair Lewis, Floyd Dell, and Theodore Dreiser. Wilson's critical works helped foster public appreciation for several novelists: Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Vladimir Nabokov.
In 1936—1937, Dos Passos served on the American Committee for the Defense of Leon Trotsky, commonly known as the "Dewey Commission", with other notable figures such as Sidney Hook, Reinhold Niebuhr, Norman Thomas, Edmund Wilson, and chairman John Dewey.

Edna St. Vincent Millay

Edna St Vincent MillayMillayEdna Vincent Millay
He played a recurring role throughout Edna St Vincent Millay's life, from the time she was a foreign correspondent for Vanity Fair magazine, 1921 to 1923, to the end of her life.
Counted among Millay's close friends were the writers Witter Bynner, Arthur Davison Ficke, and Susan Glaspell, as well as Floyd Dell and the critic Edmund Wilson, both of whom proposed marriage to her and were refused.

Edmund Wilson House

His family's summer home at Talcottville, New York, known as Edmund Wilson House, was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1973.
It was named "The Stone House" by Edmund Wilson, whose family used the house as a summer home and he made it famous in his book Upstate.

Symbolism (arts)

SymbolismSymbolistSymbolists
Axel's Castle: A Study in the Imaginative Literature of 1870–1930 (1931) was a sweeping survey of Symbolism.
From this play, Edmund Wilson adopted the title Axel's Castle for his influential study of the symbolist literary aftermath.

Library of America

The Library of AmericaThe Library of America series
His scheme for a Library of America series of national classic works came to fruition through the efforts of Jason Epstein after Wilson's death.
The Bibliothèque de la Pléiade ("La Pléiade") series published in France provided the model for the LOA, which was long a dream of critic and author Edmund Wilson.

The New Republic

New Republicthe ''New RepublicBruce Bliven
Wilson was the managing editor of Vanity Fair in 1920 and 1921, and later served as associate editor of The New Republic and as a book reviewer for The New Yorker and The New York Review of Books.
Walter Lippmann, Edmund Wilson, and Robert Morss Lovett, among others, served on this board at various times.

Red Bank, New Jersey

Red BankRed Bank, NJRed Bank Borough
Wilson was born in Red Bank, New Jersey.
Edmund Wilson (1895–1972), literary critic. (B)

Dewey Commission

Commission of InquirycommissionJohn Dewey Commission
He served on the Dewey Commission, that set out to fairly evaluate the charges that led to the exile of Leon Trotsky.
It comprised Franz Boas, John Chamberlain, John Dos Passos, Louis Hacker, Sidney Hook, Suzanne La Follette, Reinhold Niebuhr, George Novack, Norman Thomas and Edmund Wilson.

H. P. Lovecraft

H.P. LovecraftLovecraftLovecraftian
In an essay on the work of horror writer H. P. Lovecraft, "Tales of the Marvellous and the Ridiculous" (New Yorker, November 1945; later collected in Classics and Commercials), Wilson condemned Lovecraft's tales as "hackwork".
Early efforts to revise an established literary view of Lovecraft as an author of 'pulp' were resisted by some eminent critics; in 1945 Edmund Wilson expressed the opinion that "the only real horror in most of these fictions is the horror of bad taste and bad art".

The Last Tycoon

Monroe StahrThe Love of the Last Tycoon
After Fitzgerald's early death (at the age of 44) from a heart attack in December 1940, Wilson edited two books by Fitzgerald (The Last Tycoon and The Crack-Up) for posthumous publication, donating his editorial services to help Fitzgerald's family.
In 1941, it was published posthumously under this title, as prepared by his friend Edmund Wilson, a critic and writer.

T. S. Eliot

T.S. EliotEliotEliot, T. S.
It covered Arthur Rimbaud, Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam (author of Axël), W. B. Yeats, Paul Valéry, T. S. Eliot, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, and Gertrude Stein.
For the critic Edmund Wilson, it marked "The nadir of the phase of despair and desolation given such effective expression in The Waste Land."

Elena Mumm Thornton Wilson

He later married Elena Mumm Thornton (previously married to James Worth Thornton), but continued to have extramarital relationships.
Elena Mumm Thornton Wilson (27 August 1906 – 27 July 1979) was born into an unusual, wealthy, aristocratic European family and was the fourth wife of the famed American writer Edmund Wilson.

The Crack-Up

essay of the same name
After Fitzgerald's early death (at the age of 44) from a heart attack in December 1940, Wilson edited two books by Fitzgerald (The Last Tycoon and The Crack-Up) for posthumous publication, donating his editorial services to help Fitzgerald's family.
After Fitzgerald's death in 1940, Edmund Wilson compiled and edited this anthology, first published by New Directions in 1945.

James Worth Thornton

James "Jimmy" Worth Thornton
He later married Elena Mumm Thornton (previously married to James Worth Thornton), but continued to have extramarital relationships.
Also, Thornton appeared in the journals of Edmund Wilson, the noted essayist.

The Cold War and the Income Tax

In his book The Cold War and the Income Tax: A Protest (1963) Wilson argued that as a result of competitive militarization against the Soviet Union, the civil liberties of Americans were being paradoxically infringed under the guise of defense from Communism.
The Cold War and the Income Tax: A Protest is a book written by Edmund Wilson and published by Farrar, Straus in 1963.

Axël

It covered Arthur Rimbaud, Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam (author of Axël), W. B. Yeats, Paul Valéry, T. S. Eliot, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, and Gertrude Stein.
Edmund Wilson used the title Axel's Castle for his study of early Modernist literature.

Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam

Villiers de l'Isle-AdamVilliers de l'Isle AdamComte de Villiers de l'Isle-Adam
It covered Arthur Rimbaud, Auguste Villiers de l'Isle-Adam (author of Axël), W. B. Yeats, Paul Valéry, T. S. Eliot, Marcel Proust, James Joyce, and Gertrude Stein.
Edmund Wilson used the title Axel's Castle for his study of early Modernist literature.

Eugene Onegin

Oneginnovel of the same nameAct III pas de deux from Onegin
However, their friendship was marred by Wilson's cool reaction to Nabokov's Lolita and irretrievably damaged by Wilson's public criticism of what he considered Nabokov's eccentric translation of Pushkin's Eugene Onegin.
Nabokov's previously close friend Edmund Wilson reviewed Nabokov's translation in the New York Review of Books, which sparked an exchange of letters and an enduring falling-out between them.

Vladimir Nabokov

NabokovNabokovianNabokov, Vladimir
Wilson's critical works helped foster public appreciation for several novelists: Ernest Hemingway, John Dos Passos, William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Vladimir Nabokov.
He lamented to the critic Edmund Wilson, "I am too old to change Conradically" – which John Updike later called, "itself a jest of genius".