Edward Carpenter

Edward Carpenter (1844 - 1929)[Edward] CarpenterCarpenterCarpenter, Edward
Edward Carpenter (29 August 1844 – 28 June 1929) was an English socialist poet, philosopher, anthologist, and early activist for gay rights and animal rights.wikipedia
213 Related Articles

LGBT social movements

gay rights movementgay rightsLGBTQ rights movement
Edward Carpenter (29 August 1844 – 28 June 1929) was an English socialist poet, philosopher, anthologist, and early activist for gay rights and animal rights.
Another friend of Ives was the English socialist poet Edward Carpenter.

Maurice (novel)

MauriceMaurice'' (novel)novel
An early advocate of sexual freedoms, he had an influence on both D. H. Lawrence and Sri Aurobindo, and inspired E. M. Forster's novel Maurice.
Forster was close friends with the poet Edward Carpenter, and upon visiting his Derbyshire home in 1912, was motivated to write Maurice.

Havelock Ellis

Henry Havelock EllisEllis, Havelockeonism
He corresponded with many famous figures, such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E. D. Morel, William Morris, Edward R. Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner. Carpenter included among his friends the scholar, author, naturalist, and founder of the Humanitarian League, Henry S. Salt, and his wife, Catherine; the critic, essayist and sexologist, Havelock Ellis, and his wife, Edith; actor and producer Ben Iden Payne; Labour activists, John Bruce and Katharine Glasier; writer and scholar, John Addington Symonds; and the writer and feminist, Olive Schreiner.
He joined The Fellowship of the New Life in 1883, meeting other social reformers Eleanor Marx, Edward Carpenter and George Bernard Shaw.

Walt Whitman

WhitmanWhitmanesqueWalter Whitman
A poet and writer, he was a close friend of Rabindranath Tagore, and a friend of Walt Whitman.
In 1924, Edward Carpenter told Gavin Arthur of a sexual encounter in his youth with Whitman, the details of which Arthur recorded in his journal.

Olive Schreiner

Olive SchreiberSchreiner
He corresponded with many famous figures, such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E. D. Morel, William Morris, Edward R. Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner. Carpenter included among his friends the scholar, author, naturalist, and founder of the Humanitarian League, Henry S. Salt, and his wife, Catherine; the critic, essayist and sexologist, Havelock Ellis, and his wife, Edith; actor and producer Ben Iden Payne; Labour activists, John Bruce and Katharine Glasier; writer and scholar, John Addington Symonds; and the writer and feminist, Olive Schreiner.
Another friendship that would prove to be influential was with Edward Carpenter, the founder Socialist and gay rights activist, which, as Stephen Gray shows, remains hardly explored.

John Neale Dalton

John Neale Dalton, CVO, CMGJohn Neale Dalton, CVO, CMG, MA
His lifelong friend and fellow Cambridge student John Neale Dalton took the position.
Dalton had been second choice as tutor, after Edward Carpenter, another clergyman who had been a student at Cambridge University at the same time as Dalton and who remained a lifelong friend.

George Merrill (gay activist)

George MerrillGeorge Merrill.
He corresponded with many famous figures, such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E. D. Morel, William Morris, Edward R. Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner.
George Merrill (1866 – 10 January 1928) was the lifelong partner of English poet and LGBT activist Edward Carpenter.

Trinity Hall, Cambridge

Trinity HallTrinity Hall, University of CambridgeTrinity Hall College
His academic ability became evident relatively late in his youth, but was sufficient to earn him a place at Trinity Hall, Cambridge.

Sheffield Socialist Society

The group instead chose to remain independent, and became the Sheffield Socialist Society.
The Society was founded in 1886 on the initiative of Edward Carpenter.

Harold Cox

Cox, Harold
He asked Harold Cox to send him a pair of sandals from India, and used this pair as a template to begin making sandals at Millthorpe.
Edward Carpenter told some of Harold’s story, and acknowledged his part in providing Edward with comfortable footwear:

John Ruskin

RuskinRuskinianRuskinian Gothic
He corresponded with many famous figures, such as Annie Besant, Isadora Duncan, Havelock Ellis, Roger Fry, Mahatma Gandhi, Keir Hardie, J. K. Kinney, Jack London, George Merrill, E. D. Morel, William Morris, Edward R. Pease, John Ruskin, and Olive Schreiner.
Edward Carpenter's community in Millthorpe, Derbyshire was partly inspired by Ruskin, and John Kenworthy's colony at Purleigh, Essex, which was briefly a refuge for the Doukhobors, combined Ruskin's ideas and Tolstoy's.

Socialist League (UK, 1885)

Socialist League Socialist LeagueUK Socialist League
In 1884, he left the SDF with William Morris to join the Socialist League.
Several important individuals in the movement such as author Edward Carpenter and artist Walter Crane also chose to cast their lot with the fledgling Socialist League.

Sandal

sandalsBarefoot sandalschaplis
He asked Harold Cox to send him a pair of sandals from India, and used this pair as a template to begin making sandals at Millthorpe.
In his autobiography Edward Carpenter told how sandals came to be made in England:

Uranian

UrningUranismTaxonomy of Uranismus
It is noticeable how often Uranians of good position and breeding are drawn to rougher types, as of manual workers, and frequently very permanent alliances grow up in this way, which although not publicly acknowledged have a decided influence on social institutions, customs and political tendencies.
The term Uranian was quickly adopted by English-language advocates of homosexual emancipation in the Victorian era, such as Edward Carpenter and John Addington Symonds, who used it to describe a comradely love that would bring about true democracy, uniting the "estranged ranks of society" and breaking down class and gender barriers.

Cecil Reddie

Carpenter lived with Cecil Reddie from 1888 to 1889 and helped Reddie found Abbotsholme School in Derbyshire in 1889 with the financial support of Robert Muirhead and William Cassels.
He was influenced by fellow teacher Clement Charles Cotterill, polymath Patrick Geddes, the romantic socialist poet, Edward Carpenter and John Ruskin.

Holmesfield

MillthorpeHolmesfield CastleMillthorpe, Derbyshire
This enabled Carpenter to quit his lectureship to start a simpler life of market gardening in Millthorpe, near Holmesfield, Derbyshire.

William Swan Sonnenschein

Swan SonnenscheinSwan Sonnenschein, Lowrey & Co.Swan Sonnenschein, Lowrey, & Co.
The book was published again in 1906 by William Swan Sonnenschein.
The firm also acquired a reputation for publishing radical works, including those of George Bernard Shaw, Karl Marx, and Edward Carpenter.

Ansel Adams

Charles Hitchcock AdamsAnsel Easton AdamsAdams
Ansel Adams was an admirer of Carpenter's writings, especially Towards Democracy.
Their shared philosophy was from Edward Carpenter's Towards Democracy, a literary work which endorsed the pursuit of beauty in life and art.

Henry Stephens Salt

Henry S. SaltHenry SaltHenry
Carpenter included among his friends the scholar, author, naturalist, and founder of the Humanitarian League, Henry S. Salt, and his wife, Catherine; the critic, essayist and sexologist, Havelock Ellis, and his wife, Edith; actor and producer Ben Iden Payne; Labour activists, John Bruce and Katharine Glasier; writer and scholar, John Addington Symonds; and the writer and feminist, Olive Schreiner.
His circle of friends included many notable figures from late-19th and early-20th century literary and political life, including writers Algernon Charles Swinburne, John Galsworthy, James Leigh Joynes (brother-in-law), Edward Carpenter, Thomas Hardy, Rudyard Kipling, Havelock Ellis, Count Leo Tolstoy, William Morris, Arnold Hills, Peter Kropotkin, Ouida, J. Howard Moore, Ernest Bell, George Bernard Shaw and Robert Cunninghame-Graham, as well as Labour leader James Keir Hardie and Fabian Society co-founders Hubert Bland and Annie Besant.

Leslie Paul

Leslie Paul was influenced by Carpenter's ideas; in turn he passed on Carpenter's ideas to the scouting group he founded, The Woodcraft Folk.
Paul's political views were inspired by H. G. Wells, William Morris,and Edward Carpenter, while his ideas about children's education were partly drawn from Rousseau's Emile.

Humanitarian League

Carpenter included among his friends the scholar, author, naturalist, and founder of the Humanitarian League, Henry S. Salt, and his wife, Catherine; the critic, essayist and sexologist, Havelock Ellis, and his wife, Edith; actor and producer Ben Iden Payne; Labour activists, John Bruce and Katharine Glasier; writer and scholar, John Addington Symonds; and the writer and feminist, Olive Schreiner.
Notable supporters of the Humanitarian League included Chairman Ernest Bell, Ralph Waldo Trine, Ernest Howard Crosby, Edward Carpenter, Alice Park, Benjamin Fay Mills, J. Howard Moore, Clarence Darrow, Keir Hardie, Thomas Hardy, George Bernard Shaw, Bertram Lloyd and Christabel Pankhurst.

Mount Cemetery

He was interred, in the same grave as Merrill, at the Mount Cemetery in Guildford.

Herbert Read

Sir Herbert ReadRead, Herbert
Herbert Read credited Carpenter's pamphlet Non-Governmental Society with converting him to anarchism.
Politically, Read considered himself an anarchist, albeit in the English quietist tradition of Edward Carpenter and William Morris.

Guildford

Guildford, SurreyGuildford, EnglandStoughton
After the First World War, he had moved to Guildford, Surrey, with George Merrill and the two lived at 23 Mountside Road.
Guildford has been the home of several writers, Edward Carpenter, the socialist poet and homosexuality equality activist, moved to the town after the First World War and lived there until his death in 1929.