Edward Ferrero

Edward Ferrero

One of the leading dance instructors, choreographers, and ballroom operators in the United States.

- Edward Ferrero

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Battle of the Crater

Battle of the American Civil War, part of the siege of Petersburg.

Scene of the explosion July 30th 1864
Alfred R. Waud, artist
Contemporary sketch of Col. Pleasants supervising the placement of powder in the mine
National Park Service marker depicting details of the mine
Sketch of the explosion, as seen from the Union line
Battle of the Crater art from the Virginia Tech Bugle 1899 yearbook
Result of the 8,000 lb of powder explosion under the Salient, 1865
The Crater in 2004
Mine entrance in 2006
Interior of Mine entrance in 2015

The breach was sealed off, and the Union forces were repulsed with severe casualties, while Brigadier General Edward Ferrero's division of black soldiers were badly mauled.

IX Corps (Union Army)

Corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War that distinguished itself in combat in multiple theaters: the Carolinas, Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Mississippi.

IX Corps badge
Union Army 1st Division Badge, IX Corps

General Parke having been made chief of staff of the Army of the Ohio, General Potter succeeded to the command of the corps, with Brig. Gen. Edward Ferrero and Col. John F. Hartranft in command of the two divisions.

Second Battle of Bull Run

Fought August 28–30, 1862, in Prince William County, Virginia, as part of the American Civil War.

Second Battle of Bull Run, fought Augt. 29th 1862, 1860s lithograph by Currier and Ives
Northeastern Virginia (1862)
Second Bull Run Campaign, August 17–30, 1862 (Additional map).
Battlefield of Manassas (right side)
Action at Brawner's Farm, August 28
August 29, 10 a.m.: Sigel's attack
August 29, 12 noon: Longstreet arrives, Porter stalls
August 29, 3 p.m.: Grover's attack
August 29, 5–7 p.m., Kearny's attack, Hood vs. Hatch
Stonewall Jackson's cannons on Henry House Hill
August 30, 3 p.m., Porter's attack
August 30, 4 p.m.: Start of Longstreet's attack
August 30, 4:30 p.m.: Union defense of Chinn Ridge
August 30, 5 p.m.: Final Confederate attacks, beginning of the Union retreat
Bridge crossed by the Union troops retreating to Centreville
Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862
Union troops retreat after the battle
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<center>Soldiers stand next to a completely destroyed Henry House in 1862</center>
<center>Virginia, Bull Run. Ruins of Stone Bridge, 1862</center>
<center>A group of men stand near the Manassas Railroad Junction railroad tracks in 1862 with a train in the background</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>A group of men near Manassas Railroad Junction in 1862</center>
<center>Men sit near the Manassas Junction railroad in 1862</center>
<center>Picking up debris of trains after Pope's retreat</center>
<center>Bull Run, Va. Dedication of the battle monument; Judge Abram B. Olin of the District of Columbia Supreme Court, who delivered the address, stands by the rail.</center>
Battle map drafted by Sneden, Robert Knox, with notes on Union and Confederate strengths, casualties, done in pen and ink and water color

Maj. Gen. Jesse L. Reno (brigades of Col. James Nagle and Col. Edward Ferrero)

Siege of Petersburg

Series of battles around Petersburg, Virginia, fought from June 9, 1864, to March 25, 1865, during the American Civil War.

The "Dictator" siege mortar at Petersburg. In the foreground, the figure on the right is Brig. Gen. Henry J. Hunt, chief of artillery of the Army of the Potomac.
Fredericksburg, Virginia; May 1863. Soldiers in the trenches. Trench warfare would appear again more infamously in World War I
A portion of the 4th USCT Infantry
Siege of Petersburg, assaults on June 15–18
Siege of Petersburg, movements against the railroads and A.P. Hill's counterattack, June 21–22
Wilson–Kautz Raid, June 22 – July 1
"Dictator" siege mortar on the U.S. Military Railroad at Petersburg
First Battle of Deep Bottom, July 27–29
Siege of Petersburg, Battle of the Crater, July 30
Sketch of the explosion seen from the Union line.
Second Battle of Deep Bottom, August 14–20
Siege of Petersburg, capture of the Weldon Railroad, August 18–19
Siege of Petersburg, actions on October 27
Siege of Petersburg, actions preceding Five Forks
Grant's final assaults and Lee's retreat (start of the Appomattox Campaign)
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<center>Brig. Gen. August Kautz</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>
Smoke is still rising from the ruins of Richmond, Virginia after surrendering on April 3, 1865 following the Union victory at the siege of Petersburg. Union cavalry mounts with carbines visible are hitched in the foreground.

IX Corps, under Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside, including the divisions of Brig. Gens. James H. Ledlie, Robert B. Potter, Orlando B. Willcox, and Edward Ferrero (the latter division being manned by United States Colored Troops). Maj. Gen. John G. Parke replaced Burnside after the Battle of the Crater.

Battle of Antietam

Battle of the American Civil War fought on September 17, 1862, between Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia and Union Gen. George B. McClellan's Army of the Potomac near Sharpsburg, Maryland and Antietam Creek.

The Battle of Antietam, by Kurz & Allison (1878), depicting the scene of action at Burnside's Bridge
Lincoln with McClellan and staff at the Grove Farm after the battle. Notable figures (from left) are 1. Col. Delos Sackett; 4. Gen. George W. Morell; 5. Alexander S. Webb, Chief of Staff, V Corps; 6. McClellan;. 8. Dr. Jonathan Letterman; 10. Lincoln; 11. Henry J. Hunt; 12. Fitz John Porter; 15. Andrew A. Humphreys; 16. Capt. George Armstrong Custer.
Battlefield of Antietam, situation September 15 to 16, 1862
Overview of the Battle of Antietam
Assaults by the I Corps, 5:30 to 7:30 a.m.
Dead Confederate soldiers from Starke's Louisiana Brigade, on the Hagerstown Turnpike, north of the Dunker Church. Photograph by Alexander Gardner.
Assaults by the XII Corps, 7:30 to 9:00 a.m.
The Dunker Church after September 17, 1862. Here, both Union and Confederate dead lie together on the field.
Assaults by the XII and II Corps, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.
Sunken Road
The Bloody Lane in 2005
Confederate dead lie in the "Bloody Lane" after the Battle of Antietam, 1862.
Assaults by the IX Corps, 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
Confederate dead gathered for burial after the battle. Photograph by Alexander Gardner.
Photograph by Alexander Gardner of Lincoln and McClellan near the Antietam battlefield, October 3, 1862
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{{center|Charge of the 51st New York and 51st Pennsylvania across Burnside's Bridge, by Edwin Forbes}}
{{center|Battle of Antietam by Kurz and Allison}}
{{center|Confederate guns on the hill above poured fire into the Union ranks at Burnside's bridge. Photo taken just after the Battle of Antietam, 1862.}}
Union positions below the Confederates at Burnside Bridge
Burnside Bridge in 2012
{{center|Confederate soldiers on the Antietam battlefield as they fell inside the fence on the Hagerstown road, September 1862 by Alexander Gardner}}
{{center|Harper's Weekly drawing of dead soldiers on Antietam battlefield, based on Gardner photograph}}
{{center|Confederate horses lay dead and artillery caissons destroyed on Antietam battlefield<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 168–70.</ref>}}
{{center|Dead on Antietam battlefield<ref>Site identified by Robert Kalasky, "Military Images" Volume XX, Number 6 May–June 1999, pp. 24–29.</ref>}}
{{center|Confederate dead at Bloody Lane, looking east from the north bank. Alexander Gardner photograph.}}
{{center|Confederate dead at Bloody Lane, looking northeast from the south bank. Alexander Gardner photograph.<ref>The Union soldiers looking on were likely members of the 130th Pennsylvania, who were assigned burial detail</ref>}}
{{center|"Confederate soldier who after being wounded had evidently dragged himself to a little ravine on the hillside where he died". Photograph by Alexander Gardner.}}
{{center|Federal burial party, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 144–47.</ref>}}
{{center|Burying Union dead on the Antietam battlefield}}
{{center|"A Lonely Grave"—Federal grave at Antietam, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Site identified by Frassanito, pp. 171–74.</ref>}}
{{center|Antietam Battlefield photograph, by Alexander Gardner<ref>Original description claimed "Battlefield of Antietam on the Day of the Battle" September 17, 1862; however, see Frassanito, pp. 70–73.</ref>}}
{{center|"Artillery Hell", by James Hope (Dunker Church at the far left)}}
{{center|"A Fateful Turn"—Late morning looking east toward the Roulette Farm", by James Hope}}
{{center|"The Aftermath at Bloody Lane", by James Hope}}
{{center|"Wasted Gallantry", by James Hope}}
{{center|"A Crucial Delay", by James Hope}}
{{center|The Lutheran Church just east of Sharpsburg marks the extent of the Union offensive during the Battle of Antietam, 1862.}}

Brig. Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis (brigades of Brig. Gens. James Nagle and Edward Ferrero).

Appomattox campaign

Series of American Civil War battles fought March 29 – April 9, 1865, in Virginia that concluded with the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia to forces of the Union Army under the overall command of Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant, marking the effective end of the war.

Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee, opposing commanders in the Appomattox campaign
Major General John B. Gordon
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The Peacemakers by George Peter Alexander Healy, 1868, depicts the historic 1865 meeting on the River Queen
Actions at Petersburg before and during the Battle of Five Forks
Brigadier General Joshua Chamberlain
Brigadier General (Brevet Major General) George Armstrong Custer
Brigadier General W.H.F. "Rooney" Lee
Colonel Thomas T. Munford
Major General Philip Sheridan
Major General George Pickett
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Grant's assault on the Petersburg line and the start of Lee's retreat.
Major General Horatio G. Wright
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Major General Cadmus Wilcox
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Major General Henry Heth
Brigadier General Nelson A. Miles
Brigadier General John R. Cooke
Thomas Wallace House at Petersburg, Virginia
Lee's retreat and Grant's pursuit, April 2–9, 1865
Brigadier General Rufus Barringer
Captain Thomas Custer
Davies captures the wagon train
High Bridge
Picture by Timothy H. O'Sullivan, 1865
Brigadier General Thomas Alfred Smyth
Colonel Ely S. Parker
Lieutenant General Ulysses S. Grant
Colonel Charles Marshall
General Robert E. Lee
Union soldiers at the courthouse in April 1865.
Appomattox Centennial, 1965 issue.
Generals Sherman, Grant and Sheridan, 1937 Issue
Generals Lee and Jackson, 1937 Issue.
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<center>Lt. Gen. James Longstreet, First Corps</center>
<center>Maj. Gen. John B. Gordon</center>
<center>Lt. Gen. Richard H. Anderson</center>
<center>Lt. Gen. Richard S. Ewell</center>
<center>Brig. Gen. Henry A. Wise</center>
Fascine Trench Breastworks, Petersburg, Va. – NARA – 524792. Although identified as Confederate Trenches this is actually Union Fort Sedgwick aka "Fort Hell" which was opposite Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damnation"<ref>Civil War talk Forum</ref>
Confederate defenses at Petersburg, Virginia, 1865 showing the site of "Fort Mahone"
Union Army 9th Corps attacking Fort Mahone aka "Fort Damanation" sketch by Alfred Ward.
Confederate artilleryman killed during the final Union assault against the trenches at Petersburg. Photo by Thomas C. Roche, April 3, 1865.<ref>Frassanito, p. 360.</ref><ref>See website Petersburg Project on location of Many of the Roche photographs at Petersburg April 1865</ref> Although prints of this picture list it as being taken at Ft Mahone, historians at the "Petersburg Project" believe it was taken at Confederate Battery 25<ref>Dead Artilleryman comments Petersburg Project</ref>

Defenses of Bermuda Hundred, under Maj. Gen. George L. Hartsuff, including the division of Bvt. Maj. Gen. Edward Ferrero and a separate brigade under Brig. Gen. Joseph B. Carr

Knoxville campaign

Series of American Civil War battles and maneuvers in East Tennessee during the fall of 1863 designed to secure control of the city of Knoxville and with it the railroad that linked the Confederacy east and west, and position the First Corps under Longstreet for return to the Army of Northern Virginia.

James Longstreet and Ambrose Burnside, principal commanders of the Knoxville campaign
Map of the principal locations in the Knoxville Campaign of 1863
Brig. Gen. Samuel P. Carter
Topographical Map of the Approaches and Defenses of Knoxville, December 1863 - February 1864
Defenses of Knoxville
U. S. Engineers Orville E. Babcock, left, seated on a tree stump, and Orlando Poe, right, standing on a war damaged salient in Fort Sanders, Knoxville

At 3:30 p.m., Brig. Gen. Edward Ferrero's 1st Division, IX Corps, moved up to attack, which he did at 5:00 p.m. Ferrero's men broke into the Confederate line, causing heavy casualties, and advanced almost to the enemy's rear before being checked.

Burnside's Bridge

Landmark on the Civil War Antietam National Battlefield near Sharpsburg, northwestern Maryland.

Burnside's Bridge
Charge of the 51st New York Infantry and 51st Pennsylvania Infantry regiments across Burnside's Bridge, by Edwin Forbes.
Commemorative half dollar

Finally, the 51st New York Volunteer Infantry and the 51st Pennsylvania Infantry, from Brig. Gen. Edward Ferrero's brigade, attacked from the field on the Union side of the creek, stopped briefly at the walls near the bridge to duel with the sharpshooters, and then charged and seized it, but not before the attack had been delayed for several hours beyond what had been expected.

51st New York Infantry Regiment

Infantry regiment in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

51st New York Volunteer Infantry monument at Antietam National Battlefield

The 51st New York Infantry was organized at New York City, New York beginning July 27, 1861 and mustered in for a three-year enlistment on October 23, 1861 under the command of Colonel Edward Ferrero.

James H. Ledlie

Civil engineer for American railroads and a general in the Union Army during the American Civil War.

The Union plan was to exploit the explosion by sending well-rehearsed African-American troops of Edward Ferrero's division into the gap and driving for critical objectives deep in the Confederate rear area.