A report on Edward Ord

Edward O. C. Ord and his family
Edward Ord
Grave of Edward Ord in Arlington National Cemetery

American engineer and United States Army officer who saw action in the Seminole War, the Indian Wars, and the American Civil War.

- Edward Ord

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Chicago Tribune, August 8, 1898

Jules Garesche Ord

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United States Army First Lieutenant who was killed in action after leading the charge of Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th U.S. Cavalry up San Juan Hill. History now records that Ord was responsible for the "spontaneous" charge that took the San Juan Heights during the Spanish–American War in Cuba on July 1, 1898.

United States Army First Lieutenant who was killed in action after leading the charge of Buffalo Soldiers of the 10th U.S. Cavalry up San Juan Hill. History now records that Ord was responsible for the "spontaneous" charge that took the San Juan Heights during the Spanish–American War in Cuba on July 1, 1898.

Chicago Tribune, August 8, 1898
10th Regiment United States Cavalry insignia
Buffalo Soldiers who participated in the Spanish–American War at San Juan Hill.
Obiturary of Lt. Jules G. Ord from Galveston Daily News, Galveston, Texas July 4, 1898.

His father, the then Captain Edward Otho Cresap Ord (1818–1883), married Mary Mercer Thompson (1831–1894) in 1854.

Major General J. Garesche Ord, Chairman of the Joint Brazil–U.S. Defense Commission in World War II.

James Garesche Ord

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United States Army officer who briefly commanded the 28th Infantry Division and was Chairman of the Joint Brazil–U.S. Defense Commission during World War II.

United States Army officer who briefly commanded the 28th Infantry Division and was Chairman of the Joint Brazil–U.S. Defense Commission during World War II.

Major General J. Garesche Ord, Chairman of the Joint Brazil–U.S. Defense Commission in World War II.

His grandfather was Major General Edward Otho Cresap Ord (1818–1883), and his great-grandfather was First Lieutenant James Ord (1789–1872).

Coat of arms

22nd Infantry Regiment (United States)

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Parent regiment of the United States Army.

Parent regiment of the United States Army.

Coat of arms
A few soldiers from the 22d Infantry Regt. looting shoes on Market Street (between 7th and 8th) in the aftermath of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake.
Famous painting Thank God For the Soldiers. Period piece depicting US Army soldiers bringing in critical supplies for the survivors.
Hemingway and Col. Lanham in Schnee Eifel, Germany, 18 September 1944
Soldiers quickly march to the ramp of the CH-47 Chinook helicopter that will return them to Kandahar Army Air Field on 4 Sept. 2003. The soldiers were searching in Daychopan district, Afghanistan, for Taliban fighters and illegal weapons caches. The soldiers are assigned to Company A, 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment, 10th Mountain Division. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Kyle Davis.
Soldier of 2d Battalion, 22d Infantry Regiment in Afghanistan 2013
2-22 Infantry soldiers manning an out post in Afghanistan, 2013.

The 22d Infantry Regiment fought at Santiago 3 to 17 July 1898 One of the regimental officers, Captain Edward O. Ord, (son of Major General Edward Otho Cresap Ord and whom Fort Ord was named for) remained in Cuba for nine months as interpreter on the staff of General Alexander R. Lawton while the rest of the regiment prepared for service in the Philippines.

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Fort Ord

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Former United States Army post on Monterey Bay of the Pacific Ocean coast in California, which closed in 1994 due to Base Realignment and Closure action.

Former United States Army post on Monterey Bay of the Pacific Ocean coast in California, which closed in 1994 due to Base Realignment and Closure action.

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Stilwell Hall, the Fort Ord Soldiers' Club in 1992. Stilwell Hall was the largest soldiers' club constructed in the west, in 1943. Named to honor General "Vinegar Joe" Stilwell, it was built in Mission Revival style.
Wildflowers at Fort Ord
U.S. Department of the Interior Secretary Ken Salazar unveils the Fort Ord National Monument sign.
Fort Ord National Monument view
Fort Ord Station Veterinary Hospital, 2014 photo

Despite a great demobilization of the U.S. Armed Forces during the inter-war years of the 1920s and 1930s, by 1933, the artillery field became Camp Ord, named in honor of Union Army Maj. Gen. Edward Otho Cresap Ord, (1818–1883).

The battle of Petersburg Va. April 2nd 1865, lithograph by Currier and Ives

Third Battle of Petersburg

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Fought on April 2, 1865, south and southwest of Petersburg, Virginia, at the end of the 292-day Richmond–Petersburg Campaign and in the beginning stage of the Appomattox Campaign near the conclusion of the American Civil War.

Fought on April 2, 1865, south and southwest of Petersburg, Virginia, at the end of the 292-day Richmond–Petersburg Campaign and in the beginning stage of the Appomattox Campaign near the conclusion of the American Civil War.

The battle of Petersburg Va. April 2nd 1865, lithograph by Currier and Ives
Grant's assault on the Petersburg line and the start of Lee's retreat
Major General Horatio G. Wright
Lieutenant General A. P. Hill
Major General Cadmus Wilcox
Major General John Gibbon
Major General John B. Gordon
Major General John G. Parke
Picket Post in front of Union Fort Sedgwick
Quarters of Men in Union Fort Sedgwick, Known as "Fort Hell"
61st Massachusetts Infantry attacking Fort Mahone April 1865
Confederate defenses of Fort Mahone aka Battery 29 at Petersburg, Virginia, 1865
Interior of Fort Mahone in 1865 also known as "Fort Damnation"
Brigadier General (Brevet Major General) Nelson A. Miles
Brigadier General John R. Cooke
National Park Service marker for Fort Gregg
Confederate Casualty trenches at Petersburg April 1865
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865.
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865.
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865
Dead Confederate soldier at Petersburg, Virginia, April 1865
Confederate Casualty trenches at Petersburg April 1865

Grant ordered Major General Edward Ord to move part of the Army of the James from the lines near Richmond to fill in the line to be vacated by the II Corps under Major General Andrew A. Humphreys at the southwest end of the Petersburg line before that corps moved to the west.

"The Presidio of Monterrey". Volume II, plate V from: "A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean and Round the World" by Captain George Vancouver

Presidio of Monterey, California

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Active US Army installation with historic ties to the Spanish colonial era.

Active US Army installation with historic ties to the Spanish colonial era.

"The Presidio of Monterrey". Volume II, plate V from: "A Voyage of Discovery to the North Pacific Ocean and Round the World" by Captain George Vancouver
Civil Affairs Staging Area (CASA) officers receive Chinese language instruction at the Presidio of Monterey in the Spring of 1945.
Senior Army / Navy Civil Affairs Staging Area officers at the Presidio of Monterey in the Spring of 1945.
Monterey in 1968. Presidio of Monterey in the right of the photo.
Presidio of Monterey in 2005.
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It was named for former American Civil War general, Edward Ord.

Battle of Dranesville

Battle of Dranesville

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Battle of Dranesville
Approximate site of the battle, seen in 2017
Brigadier General Edward O. C. Ord
Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart
Sketch of the Affair at Dranesville, Va. Matz, Otto H., 1895

The Battle of Dranesville was a small battle during the American Civil War that took place between Confederate forces under Brigadier General J. E. B. Stuart and Union forces under Brigadier General Edward O. C. Ord on December 20, 1861, in Fairfax County, Virginia, as part of Major General George B. McClellan's operations in northern Virginia.

Second phase of the Iuka–Corinth Campaign

Battle of Hatchie's Bridge

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Fought on October 5, 1862, in Hardeman County and McNairy County, Tennessee, as the final engagement of the Iuka–Corinth Campaign of the American Civil War.

Fought on October 5, 1862, in Hardeman County and McNairy County, Tennessee, as the final engagement of the Iuka–Corinth Campaign of the American Civil War.

Second phase of the Iuka–Corinth Campaign

Maj. Gen. Edward O.C. Ord, commanding a detachment of Ulysses S. Grant's Army of the Tennessee, was, pursuant to orders, advancing on Corinth to assist Rosecrans.

William Rich Hutton in 1880

William Rich Hutton

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Surveyor and artist who became an architect and civil engineer in Maryland and New York in the latter half of the 19th century.

Surveyor and artist who became an architect and civil engineer in Maryland and New York in the latter half of the 19th century.

William Rich Hutton in 1880
Los Angeles from the South, by W. R. Hutton, 1848

His diaries and drawings record his travel west via Panama and his six years in California, including a surveying expedition to Los Angeles in June 1849 with Lieutenant Edward O.C. Ord.

The Siege of Vicksburg by Kurz and Allison

Siege of Vicksburg

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The final major military action in the Vicksburg campaign of the American Civil War.

The final major military action in the Vicksburg campaign of the American Civil War.

The Siege of Vicksburg by Kurz and Allison
The Siege of Vicksburg - Assault on Fort Hill by Thure de Thulstrup
May 19 assaults on Vicksburg
Statue of General Grant at Vicksburg National Military Park
Statue of General Grant at Vicksburg National Military Park
May 22 assaults on Vicksburg
Siege of Vicksburg. Corps and division commanders are shown for the period June 23 – July 4.
Heavy artillery pieces that were used by the Union in order to force the besieged city and its defenders into surrender
"Whistling Dick" was the name given to this Confederate 18-pounder because of the peculiar noise made by its projectiles. It was part of the defensive batteries facing the Mississippi River at Vicksburg. On May 28, 1863, its fire sank USS Cincinnati.
Fighting at the crater at the Third Louisiana Redan
Shirley's House, also known as the White House, during the siege of Vicksburg, 1863. Union troops of Logan's division set about as engineers and sappers to undermine Confederate fortifications but they had to stay under cover for fear of Confederate sharpshooters.
Troops of John A. Logan's division enter Vicksburg on July 4
<center>Maj. Gen.
<center>Lt. Gen.
Grant's operations against Vicksburg 
Confederate
Union

McClernand's XIII Corps was turned over to Maj. Gen. Edward Ord, who had recovered from an October 1862 wound sustained at Hatchie's Bridge.