Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby

Lord DerbyEarl of DerbyLord StanleyEdward Smith-StanleyThe Earl of DerbyEdward Stanley14th Earl of DerbyDerbythe 14th Earl of DerbyEdward George Geoffrey Smith Stanley
Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, (29 March 1799 – 23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three-time Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and, to date, the longest-serving leader of the Conservative Party.wikipedia
488 Related Articles

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
Edward George Geoffrey Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, (29 March 1799 – 23 October 1869) was a British statesman, three-time Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and, to date, the longest-serving leader of the Conservative Party.
The widening of the electoral franchise in the nineteenth century forced the Conservative Party to popularise its approach under Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, who carried through their own expansion of the franchise with the Reform Act of 1867.

Stanley letter

In October 1831, Stanley wrote a letter, the Stanley Letter, to the Duke of Leinster establishing the system of National Education in Ireland.
The Stanley letter is the title given to a letter written in 1831 by Edward Stanley (who later became The 14th Earl of Derby), then Chief Secretary for Ireland.

Derby Dilly

band of renegade Whigs
He then formed a group called the "Derby Dilly" and attempted to chart a middle course between what they saw as the increasingly radical Whiggery of Lord John Russell and the conservatism of the Tories.
The Derby Dilly was a name given to a group of dissident Whigs who split from the main party under the leadership of Edward, Lord Stanley on the issue of the reorganisation of the Church of Ireland in 1834.

Stockbridge (UK Parliament constituency)

StockbridgeStockbridge (seat 1/2)borough of Stockbridge
In 1822 Edward Stanley, as he was then, was elected to Parliament in the rotten borough of Stockbridge (see Stockbridge (UK Parliament constituency)) as a Whig, the traditional party of his family.
He not only vacated his seat immediately to allow Grosvenor's nominee (Edward Stanley, a future Conservative Prime Minister but then a Whig) to be elected, but took the trouble to introduce Stanley to the electors.

Benjamin Disraeli

DisraeliLord BeaconsfieldBenjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield
He broke with the Prime Minister again in 1845, this time over the repeal of the Corn Laws, and managed to bring the majority of the Conservative Party with him (including, among others, the young Benjamin Disraeli).
When Lord Derby, the party leader, thrice formed governments in the 1850s and 1860s, Disraeli served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Leader of the House of Commons.

Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey

Earl GreyLord GreyCharles Grey
When the Whigs returned to power in 1830, Stanley became Chief Secretary for Ireland in Lord Grey's Government, and entered the Cabinet in 1831.
The Chief Secretary for Ireland, Lord Stanley, however, preferred coercive measures.

Knowsley Hall

KnowsleyKnowsley Park
The Stanleys were a long-established and very wealthy landowning family whose principal residence was Knowsley Hall in Lancashire.
Edward, the 14th Earl was a politician who became Prime Minister three times.

Second Peel ministry

Peel IITory administrationsecond government
Although they did not participate in Peel's short-lived 1835 ministry, over the next several years they gradually merged into Peel's Conservative Party, with several members of the "Derby Dilly" taking prominent positions in Peel's second ministry.

Edward Stanley, 15th Earl of Derby

Lord StanleyLord DerbyEarl of Derby
There, Derby and his Foreign Secretaries, Lord Malmesbury and later his son Lord Stanley, pursued a course of action that was aimed at building up power through financial strength, seeking to avoid wars at all costs, co-operating with other powers, and working through the Concert of Europe to resolve diplomatic problems.
He was born to Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who led the Conservative Party from 1846–1868 and served as Prime Minister three times, and Emma Caroline Bootle-Wilbraham, daughter of Edward Bootle-Wilbraham, 1st Baron Skelmersdale, and was the older brother of Frederick Arthur Stanley, 16th Earl of Derby.

Aberdeen ministry

coalition governmentAberdeenCoalition
As a result, Derby's minority government fell, making way for a Peelite–Whig coalition under Lord Aberdeen.
After the collapse of Lord Derby's minority government, the Whigs and Peelites formed a coalition under the Peelite leader Lord Aberdeen.

Secretary of State for War and the Colonies

Colonial SecretarySecretary of StateColonial Office
In 1833, Stanley moved up to the more important position of Secretary of State for War and the Colonies, overseeing the passage of the Abolition of Slavery Bill.

Sir James Graham, 2nd Baronet

Sir James GrahamJames GrahamSir James Graham, Bt
Besides Stanley, the other principal members of the Dilly were Sir James Graham, who had resigned as First Lord of the Admiralty; Lord Ripon, who had resigned as Lord Privy Seal; and the Duke of Richmond, who had resigned as Postmaster General.
He did not act alone, Lord Stanley, Lord Ripon and the Duke of Richmond also tendered their resignations.

1852 United Kingdom general election

18521852 general electiongeneral election in July 1852
In the general election of June 1852, the Conservative party under Derby and Disraeli won only 330 seats in the House of Commons—42.9% of the total.
However, a split between Protectionist Tories, led by the Earl of Derby, and the Peelites who supported Lord Aberdeen made the formation of a majority government very difficult.

Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury

Lord SalisburyThe Marquess of SalisburyMarquess of Salisbury
This administration was particularly notable for the passage of the Reform Act 1867, which greatly expanded the suffrage but which provoked the resignation of three cabinet ministers including the Secretary for India and three-time future Prime Minister, Lord Cranborne (later Lord Salisbury).
Lord Robert Cecil was first elected to the House of Commons in 1854 and served as Secretary of State for India in Lord Derby's Conservative government from 1866 until his resignation in 1867 over its introduction of Benjamin Disraeli's Reform Bill that extended the suffrage to working-class men.

Edward Smith-Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby

13th Earl of DerbyLord StanleyEdward Stanley, 13th Earl of Derby
Stanley was born to Lord Stanley (later the 13th Earl of Derby) and his wife, Charlotte Margaret, the daughter of the Reverend Geoffrey Hornby.
*Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby (1799-1869), thrice Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1852, 1858-9, 1866-8).

Peelite

PeelitesLiberal ConservativesPeelite Conservative
Although the Whigs actually won fewer seats—292 seats—there were several small groups in Parliament that might be willing to side with the Whigs on particular issues, including the 38 Conservative members of Parliament who were Peelites, who had already joined with the Whigs in June 1846 to repeal the Corn Laws; the 113 members who were Free Traders and who were interested in eliminating all tariffs on consumer goods; and the 63 members of the Irish Brigade who were interested in the independence of Ireland and Tenant's Rights for Irish tenants.
The Peelites were often called the Liberal Conservatives in contrast to Protectionist Conservatives led by Benjamin Disraeli and Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby.

Chief Secretary for Ireland

Chief SecretaryChief Secretary to the Lord Lieutenant of IrelandChief Secretary of Ireland
When the Whigs returned to power in 1830, Stanley became Chief Secretary for Ireland in Lord Grey's Government, and entered the Cabinet in 1831.

Reform Act 1867

Second Reform ActRepresentation of the People Act 1867Reform Act of 1867
This administration was particularly notable for the passage of the Reform Act 1867, which greatly expanded the suffrage but which provoked the resignation of three cabinet ministers including the Secretary for India and three-time future Prime Minister, Lord Cranborne (later Lord Salisbury).
The Conservatives formed a ministry on 26 June 1866, led by Lord Derby as Prime Minister and Disraeli as Chancellor of the Exchequer.

Emma Caroline Smith-Stanley, Countess of Derby

The Countess of DerbyEmma Bootle-WilbrahamEmma Caroline
Stanley married The Hon. Emma Bootle-Wilbraham, the second daughter of Edward Bootle-Wilbraham, on 31 May 1825.
Emma Caroline Smith-Stanley (1805 – 26 April 1876) was the Countess of Derby as the wife of Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby, who served as Prime Minister of the United Kingdom three times in the mid-19th century.

James Harris, 3rd Earl of Malmesbury

The Earl of MalmesburyLord MalmesburyEarl of Malmesbury
There, Derby and his Foreign Secretaries, Lord Malmesbury and later his son Lord Stanley, pursued a course of action that was aimed at building up power through financial strength, seeking to avoid wars at all costs, co-operating with other powers, and working through the Concert of Europe to resolve diplomatic problems. In his private diary, the Earl of Malmesbury in 1857 commented on Derby's failure to exploit the press:
Malmesbury served as Foreign Secretary under the Earl of Derby in 1852 and again from 1858 to 1859 and was also Lord Privy Seal under Derby and Benjamin Disraeli between 1866 and 1868 and under Disraeli between 1874 and 1876.

Corn Laws

Corn Lawrepeal of the Corn LawsImportation Act 1815
He broke with the Prime Minister again in 1845, this time over the repeal of the Corn Laws, and managed to bring the majority of the Conservative Party with him (including, among others, the young Benjamin Disraeli). Although the Whigs actually won fewer seats—292 seats—there were several small groups in Parliament that might be willing to side with the Whigs on particular issues, including the 38 Conservative members of Parliament who were Peelites, who had already joined with the Whigs in June 1846 to repeal the Corn Laws; the 113 members who were Free Traders and who were interested in eliminating all tariffs on consumer goods; and the 63 members of the Irish Brigade who were interested in the independence of Ireland and Tenant's Rights for Irish tenants.
Lord Stanley resigned from the Cabinet in protest.

Earl of Derby

Earls of DerbyLord DerbyEarl of Derby (1485)
In 1844 he was summoned to the House of Lords as Lord Stanley of Bickerstaffe in his father's Barony of Stanley by Writ of Acceleration.
His son, Edward, succeeded him to become the 14th Earl.

Queen Victoria

VictoriaVictoria of the United KingdomDiamond Jubilee of Queen Victoria
When Aberdeen's administration fell in 1855, Queen Victoria asked Derby to form a government.
The following year, President Bonaparte was declared Emperor Napoleon III, by which time Russell's administration had been replaced by a short-lived minority government led by Lord Derby.

Napoleon III

Napoléon IIILouis NapoleonNapoleon III of France
In 1858, Derby formed another minority government upon the resignation of Lord Palmerston following a parliamentary defeat to an opposition motion which, in the context of a failed plot to assassinate Napoleon III of France, charged that "the ministry had admitted they sheltered assassins".
He approached Lord Derby, the British Prime Minister, and the British Government; Britain was against the war, but agreed to remain neutral.