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Cannabis (drug)

marijuanacannabispot
Cannabis has various psychological and physiological effects on the human body.
Cannabis has mental and physical effects, such as creating a "high" or "stoned" feeling, a general change in perception, heightened mood, and an increase in appetite.

Cannabis and time perception

distortions in the perception of timeeffect of cannabis on time perceptiondisorientation in the sense of time
Cannabis produces many other subjective and highly tangible effects, such as increased enjoyment of food taste and aroma, and marked distortions in the perception of time and space (where experiencing a "rush" of ideas from long-term memory can create the subjective impression of long elapsed time, while in reality only a short time has passed).
Reports of the effects of cannabis on time perception can be found first in arts and literature, and then in medical reports and studies.

Substance intoxication

intoxicationintoxicatedhigh
The psychoactive effects of cannabis, known as a "high", are subjective and vary among persons and the method of use.
F12.0 cannabinoid intoxication(high)

Panic attack

panic attacksanxiety attackanxiety attacks
Between 20 and 30 percent of recreational users experience intense anxiety and/or panic attacks after smoking cannabis, however, some report anxiety only after not smoking cannabis for a prolonged period of time.
According to the Harvard Mental Health Letter, "the most commonly reported side effects of smoking marijuana are anxiety and panic attacks. Studies report that about 20% to 30% of recreational users experience such problems after smoking marijuana."

Cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome

Rarely, chronic users experience a severe vomiting disorder, cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome, after smoking and find relief by taking hot baths.
The long-term and short-term effects of cannabis use are associated with behavioral effects leading to a wide variety of effects on the body systems and physiologic states.

Tetrahydrocannabinol

THCdelta-9-tetrahydrocannabinolΔ 9 -THC
The effects of cannabis are caused by the chemical compounds in the plant, including cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is only one of more than 100 different cannabinoids present in the plant. When THC enters the blood stream and reaches the brain, it binds to cannabinoid receptors. The most prevalent psychoactive substances in cannabis are cannabinoids, particularly THC.
Effects of cannabis

Cannabinoid receptor

cannabinoid receptorscannabinoidCB 1
When THC enters the blood stream and reaches the brain, it binds to cannabinoid receptors.
Effects of cannabis

Chemical compound

compoundcompoundschemical compounds
The effects of cannabis are caused by the chemical compounds in the plant, including cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is only one of more than 100 different cannabinoids present in the plant.

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
Cannabis has various psychological and physiological effects on the human body.

Euphoria

euphoriceuphorianthigh
Acute effects while under the influence can include euphoria and anxiety.

Anxiety

anxiousnervousnessanxieties
Acute effects while under the influence can include euphoria and anxiety.

Cannabidiol

CBDcannabidiol (CBD)CBD oil
Cannabidiol (CBD), another cannabinoid found in cannabis in varying amounts, has been shown to alleviate the adverse effects of THC that some consumers experience. There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

United States

American🇺🇸U.S.
In the United States research about medical cannabis has been hindered by federal law.

Medical cannabis

medical marijuanamedicinalmedical
In the United States research about medical cannabis has been hindered by federal law.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

DSMDSM-IVDSM-IV-TR
Cannabis use disorder is defined as a medical diagnosis in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

DSM-5

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disordersmental health disordersDSM-V
Cannabis use disorder is defined as a medical diagnosis in the fifth revision of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

Cannabis

marijuanahemppot
The most prevalent psychoactive substances in cannabis are cannabinoids, particularly THC.

Cannabinoid

cannabinoidsendocannabinoidsphytocannabinoid
The effects of cannabis are caused by the chemical compounds in the plant, including cannabinoids, such as tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is only one of more than 100 different cannabinoids present in the plant. The most prevalent psychoactive substances in cannabis are cannabinoids, particularly THC.

Tetrahydrocannabivarin

THCVΔ 9 -tetrahydrocannabivarin
Another psychoactive cannabinoid present in Cannabis sativa is tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV), but it is only found in small amounts and is a cannabinoid antagonist.

Isomer

isomersisomerismisomeric
There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

Cannabivarin

There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

Structural analog

analogueanaloganalogs
There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

Cannabinol

CBNcannabinol (CBN)
There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

Side chain

side-chainside chainsside-chains
There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.

Cannabidivarin

CBDV
There are similar compounds in cannabis that do not exhibit psychoactive response but are obligatory for functionality: cannabidiol (CBD), an isomer of THC; cannabivarin (CBV), an analog of cannabinol (CBN) with a different side chain, cannabidivarin (CBDV), an analog of CBD with a different side chain, and cannabinolic acid.