Ego ideal

ideal egoego-idealegoego ideals
In Freudian psychoanalysis, the ego ideal (Ichideal) is the inner image of oneself as one wants to become.wikipedia
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Id, ego and super-ego

egoidsuperego
Alternatively, "the Freudian notion of a perfect or ideal self housed in the superego," consisting of "the individual's conscious and unconscious images of what he would like to be, patterned after certain people whom ... he regards as ideal."
In "The Ego and the Id" (1923), Freud presents "the general character of harshness and cruelty exhibited by the [ego] ideal — its dictatorial Thou shalt; thus, in the psychology of the ego, Freud hypothesized different levels of ego ideal or superego development with greater ideals:

Sigmund Freud

FreudFreudianFreudian theory
Alternatively, "the Freudian notion of a perfect or ideal self housed in the superego," consisting of "the individual's conscious and unconscious images of what he would like to be, patterned after certain people whom ... he regards as ideal." In Freudian psychoanalysis, the ego ideal (Ichideal) is the inner image of oneself as one wants to become.
The "dissolution" of the Oedipus complex is then achieved when the child's rivalrous identification with the parental figure is transformed into the pacifying identifications of the Ego ideal which assume both similarity and difference and acknowledge the separateness and autonomy of the other.

On Narcissism

On Narcissism: An Introduction
In Freud's "On Narcissism: an Introduction" [1914], among other innovations — "most important of all perhaps — it introduces the concepts of the 'ego ideal' and of the self-observing agency related to it, which were the basis of what was ultimately to be described as the 'super-ego' in The Ego and the Id (1923b)."
Most importantly he introduces the idea of the 'ego ideal', and the self-observing agency related to it.

The Ego and the Id

In Freud's "On Narcissism: an Introduction" [1914], among other innovations — "most important of all perhaps — it introduces the concepts of the 'ego ideal' and of the self-observing agency related to it, which were the basis of what was ultimately to be described as the 'super-ego' in The Ego and the Id (1923b)."
The ego is divided into two parts: the ego itself and the super-ego (Über-Ich), or the ego-ideal (Ideal-Ich) (34).

Narcissism

narcissisticnarcissistnarcissists
Freud considered that the ego ideal was the heir to the narcissism of childhood: the "ideal ego is now the target of the self-love which was enjoyed in childhood by the actual ego ... is the substitute for the lost narcissism of his childhood."

Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego

A few years later, in Group Psychology and the Analysis of the Ego (1921), he examined further how "some such agency develops in our ego which may cut itself off from the rest of the ego and come into conflict with it. We have called it the 'ego ideal'... heir to the original narcissism in which the childish ego enjoyed self-sufficiency."
Thus, Freud came to the conclusion: "A primary mass is a number of individuals who have put one and the same object in place of their ego ideal and consequently identify with each other."

Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel

Chasseguet-Smirgel
"Janine Chasseguet-Smirgel (1985) identified various possible outcomes for the ego ideal, perverse as well as creative."
She is best known for her reworking of the Freudian theory of the ego ideal and its connection to primary narcissism, as well as for her extension of this theory to a critique of utopian ideology.

Daniel Lagache

Daniel Lagache and Roberto Assagioli
Thereafter Daniel Lagache developed the distinction, asserting with particular reference to adolescence that "the adolescent identifies him- or herself anew with the ideal ego and strives by this means to separate from the superego and the ego ideal."
In a more critical vein, Lacan also took up Lagache's work on the ego ideal, as a springboard for his own article "Remarque sur le rapport de Daniel Lagache" on the distinction of the ideal ego and the ego ideal'.

Psychoanalysis

psychoanalystpsychoanalyticpsychoanalytical
In Freudian psychoanalysis, the ego ideal (Ichideal) is the inner image of oneself as one wants to become.

Self-love

Philautialove of selfrespect and love for themselves
Freud considered that the ego ideal was the heir to the narcissism of childhood: the "ideal ego is now the target of the self-love which was enjoyed in childhood by the actual ego ... is the substitute for the lost narcissism of his childhood."

Ernest Jones

JonesJones, Ernest
Ernest Jones records that "I once asked Freud if he regarded an 'ego-ideal' as a universal attribute, and he replied with a puzzled expression: 'Do you think Stekel has an ego-ideal?'."

Wilhelm Stekel

Wilhelm SteckelStekel
Ernest Jones records that "I once asked Freud if he regarded an 'ego-ideal' as a universal attribute, and he replied with a puzzled expression: 'Do you think Stekel has an ego-ideal?'."

Hermann Nunberg

"Hermann Nunberg defined the ideal ego as the combination of the ego and the id. This agency is the outcome of omnipotent narcissism and is manifested as pathology."

Otto Fenichel

FenichelFenichel, Otto
Otto Fenichel, building on Sandor Rado's "differentiation of the 'good' (i.e., protecting) and the 'bad' (i.e., punishing) aspects of the superego" explored attempts to "distinguish ego ideals, the patterns of what one would like to be, from the superego, which is characterized as a threatening, prohibiting, and punishing power": while acknowledging the linkages between the two agencies, he suggested for example that "in humor the overcathected superego is the friendly and protective ego-ideal; in depression, it is the negative, hostile, punishing conscience."

Sandor Rado

Sándor RadóRadoSándor Radó (psychoanalyst)
Otto Fenichel, building on Sandor Rado's "differentiation of the 'good' (i.e., protecting) and the 'bad' (i.e., punishing) aspects of the superego" explored attempts to "distinguish ego ideals, the patterns of what one would like to be, from the superego, which is characterized as a threatening, prohibiting, and punishing power": while acknowledging the linkages between the two agencies, he suggested for example that "in humor the overcathected superego is the friendly and protective ego-ideal; in depression, it is the negative, hostile, punishing conscience."

Melanie Klein

KleinianKleinKleinians
Kleinians like Herbert Rosenfeld "re-invoked Freud's earlier emphasis on the importance of the ego ideal in narcissism, and conceived of a characteristic internal object — a chimerical montage or monster, one might say — that was constructed of the ego, the ego ideal, and the 'mad omnipotent self'."

Herbert Rosenfeld

Kleinians like Herbert Rosenfeld "re-invoked Freud's earlier emphasis on the importance of the ego ideal in narcissism, and conceived of a characteristic internal object — a chimerical montage or monster, one might say — that was constructed of the ego, the ego ideal, and the 'mad omnipotent self'."

Otto F. Kernberg

Otto KernbergKernbergOtto Friedmann Kernberg
In their wake, Otto Kernberg highlighted the destructive qualities of the "infantile, grandiose ego ideal" - of "identification with an overidealized self- and object-representation, with the primitive form of ego-ideal."

Grandiosity

grandiosegrandiose selfaggrandising
In their wake, Otto Kernberg highlighted the destructive qualities of the "infantile, grandiose ego ideal" - of "identification with an overidealized self- and object-representation, with the primitive form of ego-ideal."

Harold Bloom

Bloom, HaroldBloomBloom, Harold.
Harold Bloom has since explored in a literary context how "in the narcissist, the ego-ideal becomes inflated and destructive, because it is filled with images of 'perfection and omnipotence'."

Jacques Lacan

LacanLacanianJaques Lacan
Lacan for his part explored the concept in terms of the subject's "narcissistic identification ... his ideal ego, that point at which he desires to gratify himself in himself."

The Imaginary (psychoanalysis)

the ImaginaryimaginaryImaginary order
For Lacan, "the subject has to regulate the completion of what comes as ... ideal ego — which is not the ego ideal — that is to say, to constitute himself in his imaginary reality."

Defence mechanism

defense mechanismdefense mechanismsdefence mechanisms
The superego consists of two structures: the conscience, which stores information about what is "bad" and what has been punished, and the ego ideal, which stores information about what is "good" and what one "should" do or be.

Triangular theory of love

companionate lovecompanionateconsummate love
His definition of an ego ideal is this: the image of the person that one wants to become, which is patterned after those whom one holds with great respect.