Eight Consciousnesses

store consciousnessalayaālayavijñānaalaya-vijnanaAlayavijnanastorehouse consciousnessālaya-vijñānaalaya consciousnessalaya-vijñanastore-consciousness
The Eight Consciousnesses (Skt. aṣṭa vijñānakāyāḥ ) is a classification developed in the tradition of the Yogācāra school of Mahayana Buddhism.wikipedia
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Bījā

bijaBījaseed syllable
This eighth consciousness is said to store the impressions (vāsanāḥ) of previous experiences, which form the seeds (bīja) of future karma in this life and in the next after rebirth.
According to this theory, all experiences and actions produce bīja as impressions, stored in the alaya (storehouse) consciousness.

Manas-vijnana

manas
"'मानस-विज्ञान"'; mānas-vijñāna; "mind-knowledge", compare man-tra, jñāna) is the seventh of the eight consciousnesses as taught in Yogacara and Zen Buddhism, the higher consciousness or intuitive consciousness that on the one hand localizes experience through thinking and on the other hand universalizes experience through intuitive perception of the universal mind of alayavijnana.

Mahayana

Mahayana BuddhismMahāyānaMahayana Buddhist
aṣṭa vijñānakāyāḥ ) is a classification developed in the tradition of the Yogācāra school of Mahayana Buddhism.
This doctrine is developed through various theories, the most important being the eight consciousnesses and the three natures.

Bhavanga

bhavaṅga
The Theravāda theory of the bhavaṅga may also be a forerunner of the ālāyavijñana theory. He states that the alaya is what the Mahasamghikas call the “root-consciousness” (mulavijñana), what the Mahīśāsakas call “the aggregate which lasts as long as samsara” (asaṃsārikaskandha) and what the Sthaviras call the bhavaṅga.
It is an exclusively Theravada doctrine that differs from Sarvastivadin and Sautrantika theories of mind, and has been compared to the Mahayana concept of store-consciousness.

Je Tsongkhapa

TsongkhapaTsong KhapaTsongkapa
While some noteworthy modern scholars of the Gelug tradition (which was founded by Tsongkhapa's reforms to Atisha's Kadam school) assert that the ' is posited only in the Yogācāra philosophical tenet system, all non-Gelug schools of Tibetan buddhism maintain that the ' is accepted by the various Madhyamaka schools, as well.
Some Mahayana sutras therefore argue that the so-called storehouse consciousness or mind-basis-of-all consciousness was taught by the Buddha "provisionally, for the benefit of those who could be helped by believing in its existence but who would be harmed by hearing the teachings about emptiness."

Vasubandhu

SeshinVasubadhuVasubandhu’s
The internally coherent school associated with Maitreya, Asaṅga, and Vasubandhu, however, uniquely – or "uncommonly" – also posits the existence of two additional primary consciousnesses, kliṣṭamanovijñāna and, in order to explain the workings of karma.
The issue of continuity and transference of karma is explained in the latter text by an exposition of the "storehouse consciousness" (ālayavijñāna), which stores karmic seeds (bīja) and survives rebirth.

Buddha-nature

Buddha natureTathagatagarbhaTathāgatagarbha
According to the Laṅkāvatārasūtra and the schools of Chan and Zen Buddhism, the ālāyavijñāna is identical with the tathāgatagarbha, and is fundamentally pure.
For example, the Tibetan scholar Go Lotsawa outlined four meanings of the term Tathāgatagarbha as used by Indian Buddhist scholars generally: (1) As an emptiness that is a nonimplicative negation, (2) the luminous nature of the mind, (3) alaya-vijñana (store-consciousness), (4) all bodhisattvas and sentient beings.

Yogacarabhumi-sastra

Yogācārabhūmi-śāstraYogācārabhūmi ŚāstraYogācārabhūmi
According to Lambert Schmithausen, the first mention of the concept occurs in the Yogācārabhumiśāstra, which posits a basal consciousness that contains seeds for future cognitive processes.

Sandhinirmocana Sutra

Saṃdhinirmocana SūtraSaṃdhinirmocana-sūtraSamdhinirmocana sutra
It is also described in the Saṃdhinirmocanasūtra and in the Mahāyānasaṃgraha of Asaṅga.
The fifth chapter discusses the Eight Consciousnesses, including the "Storehouse Consciousnesses".

East Asian Yogācāra

HossōFaxiangHosso
According to Thomas McEvilley, although Vasubandhu had postulated numerous ālāya-vijñāna-s, a separate one for each individual person in the parakalpita, this multiplicity was later eliminated in the Fa Hsiang and Huayan metaphysics.
In keeping with Yogācāra tradition, the mind is divided into the Eight Consciousnesses and the Four Aspects of Cognition, which produce what we view as reality.

Mahāyānasaṃgraha

Mahāyāna-samgrahaMahayana-samgrahaMahayanasamgraha
It is also described in the Saṃdhinirmocanasūtra and in the Mahāyānasaṃgraha of Asaṅga.
Asanga's Mahāyānasaṃgraha expounds the major doctrines of the Mahayana Yogacara school such as the ālayavijñāna (storehouse consciousness), the 'three forms of existence' (trisvabhāva), the five paths (pañcamārga) and the Dharmakaya.

Mahāsāṃghika

MahasamghikaMahasanghikaMahasamghikas
He states that the alaya is what the Mahasamghikas call the “root-consciousness” (mulavijñana), what the Mahīśāsakas call “the aggregate which lasts as long as samsara” (asaṃsārikaskandha) and what the Sthaviras call the bhavaṅga.

Vāsanā

vasanas(vAasanA-s)karmic seed
This eighth consciousness is said to store the impressions (vāsanāḥ) of previous experiences, which form the seeds (bīja) of future karma in this life and in the next after rebirth.

Laṅkāvatāra Sūtra

Lankavatara SutraLankavataraLankavatarasutra
According to the Laṅkāvatārasūtra and the schools of Chan and Zen Buddhism, the ālāyavijñāna is identical with the tathāgatagarbha, and is fundamentally pure.
Ālayavijñāna), which is the base of the individual's deepest awareness and his tie to the cosmic.

Yogachara

YogacaraYogācāraConsciousness-only
aṣṭa vijñānakāyāḥ ) is a classification developed in the tradition of the Yogācāra school of Mahayana Buddhism.
Yogācāra then posited the "storehouse consciousness" (Sanskrit: ālayavijñāna), also known as the basal, or eighth consciousness, as the container of the seeds.

Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana

Awakening of FaithAwakening of Mahayana FaithThe Awakening of Faith
The Interpenetration and Essence-Function of Wonhyo is described in the Treatise on Awakening Mahāyāna Faith (大乘起信論, Mahāyānaśraddhotpādaśāstra, AMF in the excerpt below):
Written from the perspective of Essence-Function, this text sought to harmonize the two soteriological philosophies of the Buddha-nature (tathagatagarbha) and Eight Consciousnesses (or Yogacara) into a synthetic vision based on the One Mind in Two Aspects:

Triṃśikā-vijñaptimātratā

Thirty Verses on Consciousness-onlyThe Thirty VersesTrimsika
In it he touches on foundational Yogācāra concepts such as the storehouse consciousness, the afflicted mental consciousness, and the three natures, among others.

Mindstream

Mind Streamcitta-santānamental streams
The notion of citta-santāna developed in later Yogacara-thought, where citta-santāna replaced the notion of ālayavijñāna, the store-house consciousness in which the karmic seeds were stored.

Hakuin Ekaku

HakuinFour Ways of KnowingHakuin's Four ways of knowing
A core teaching of Chan/Zen Buddhism describes the transformation of the Eight Consciousnesses into the Four Wisdoms.

Essence-Function

Essence-Function (體用)T’i -yungTi yong
The Interpenetration and Essence-Function of Wonhyo is described in the Treatise on Awakening Mahāyāna Faith (大乘起信論, Mahāyānaśraddhotpādaśāstra, AMF in the excerpt below):

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
aṣṭa vijñānakāyāḥ ) is a classification developed in the tradition of the Yogācāra school of Mahayana Buddhism.

Karma

karmicKarmaskamma
This eighth consciousness is said to store the impressions (vāsanāḥ) of previous experiences, which form the seeds (bīja) of future karma in this life and in the next after rebirth. The internally coherent school associated with Maitreya, Asaṅga, and Vasubandhu, however, uniquely – or "uncommonly" – also posits the existence of two additional primary consciousnesses, kliṣṭamanovijñāna and, in order to explain the workings of karma.

Rebirth (Buddhism)

rebirthrebornreincarnation
This eighth consciousness is said to store the impressions (vāsanāḥ) of previous experiences, which form the seeds (bīja) of future karma in this life and in the next after rebirth.

Maitreya

Maitreya BuddhaMirokuMiroku Bosatsu
The internally coherent school associated with Maitreya, Asaṅga, and Vasubandhu, however, uniquely – or "uncommonly" – also posits the existence of two additional primary consciousnesses, kliṣṭamanovijñāna and, in order to explain the workings of karma.

Gelug

GelugpaGelukpaGeluk
While some noteworthy modern scholars of the Gelug tradition (which was founded by Tsongkhapa's reforms to Atisha's Kadam school) assert that the ' is posited only in the Yogācāra philosophical tenet system, all non-Gelug schools of Tibetan buddhism maintain that the ' is accepted by the various Madhyamaka schools, as well.