Eisenach

Nikolaikirche (left) and Nikolaitor (right)
Eisenach in 1647
Car, produced in Automobilwerk Eisenach in 1898
Demolition of historic buildings during the 1970s and 1980s.
Eisenach's town centre, viewed from the west
District map
Evolution of population since 1830
A factory of Opel, Eisenach's largest employer
Typical example of mansion architecture in the southern town
Eisenach station
A tram at Marktplatz in 1974
The "R" is the symbol of the Rennsteig hiking trail in the Thuringian Forest, which starts in Eisenach
Ernst Abbe (Heliogravure Emil Tesch)
Bachhaus
Lutherhaus
"Automobile Welt"
Thüringer Museum inside the palace
Reuter-Wagner-Museum
Predigerkirche
Goldener Löwe
St. George's Church
St. Nicholas' Church
Preachers' Church
St. Elizabeth's Church
St. Anne's Church
St. Clement's Chapel
Holy Cross Church
Wartburg
Stadtschloss
Bechtolsheim Palace
Schloss Fischbach
Jagdschloss Hohe Sonne
Alte Residenz
Bach monument
Luther monument
Burschenschaftsdenkmal
"Dejudaization Institute" Memorial
Town gate Nikolaitor
The Wandelhalle at Kartausgarten
Town hall
Theatre
Narrow House

Town in Thuringia, Germany with 42,000 inhabitants, located 50 km west of Erfurt, 70 km southeast of Kassel and 150 km northeast of Frankfurt.

- Eisenach

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Portrait of Bach by E. G. Haussmann, 1748

Johann Sebastian Bach

German composer and musician of the late Baroque period.

German composer and musician of the late Baroque period.

Portrait of Bach by E. G. Haussmann, 1748
Johann Ambrosius Bach, 1685, Bach's father. Painting attributed to Johann David Herlicius
The Wender organ Bach played in Arnstadt
Organ of the St. Paul's Church in Leipzig, tested by Bach in 1717.
Bach's autograph of the first movement of the first sonata for solo violin, BWV 1001[[File:Sonata in in G m J.S.Bach (1 mov prelude).ogg]]
St. Thomas Church and School, Leipzig in 1723
Café Zimmermann, c. 1720
Bach's seal (centre), used throughout his Leipzig years. It contains the superimposed letters J S B in mirror image topped with a crown. The flanking letters illustrate the arrangement on the seal.
A handwritten note by Bach in his copy of the Calov Bible. The note next to reads: "NB Bey einer andächtigen Musiq ist allezeit Gott mit seiner Gnaden Gegenwart" (Nota bene In a music of worship God is always present with his grace).
"O Haupt voll Blut und Wunden": the four-part chorale setting as included in the St. Matthew Passion
Bach's guide on ornaments as contained in the Klavierbüchlein für Wilhelm Friedemann Bach
"Aria" of the Goldberg Variations, showing Bach's use of ornaments[[File:Bach.Aria.Goldberg-Variationen.WerckmeisterIII.Harpsichord.ogg]]
Bach's autograph of the recitative with the gospel text of Christ's death from St Matthew Passion
The Art of Fugue (title page) – Performed by Mehmet Okonsar on organ and harpsichord
ArtofFugue-Part1of2-1to12.ogg
ArtofFugue-Part2of2-13to20.ogg
The church in Arnstadt where Bach had been the organist from 1703 to 1707. In 1935 the church was renamed "Bachkirche".
Painting of Johann Sebastian Bach by 'Gebel', before 1798.
Image of the erected by Felix Mendelssohn in Leipzig in 1843
1908 Statue of Bach in front of the Thomaskirche in Leipzig
28 July 1950: memorial service for Bach in Leipzig's Thomaskirche, on the 200th anniversary of the composer's death

The Bach family already counted several composers when Johann Sebastian was born as the last child of a city musician in Eisenach.

Geological map of Thuringian Forest

Thuringian Forest

Mountain range in the southern parts of the German state of Thuringia, running northwest to southeast.

Mountain range in the southern parts of the German state of Thuringia, running northwest to southeast.

Geological map of Thuringian Forest
Permian conglomerate of the Eisenach formation from an alluvial fan below Wartburg castle
Outcrop of amphibolite and mica schist of the Ruhla Group of the Ruhla Crystalline Complex in a former quarry
Falkenstein near Tambach-Dietharz, consisting of volcanites of Oberhof formation
East German winter sport championships in Oberhof, February 1951.
The main crags on Gebrannter Stein (897 m)
View from the Ruppberg near Zella-Mehlis
The Ohra Dam
View at a part of Stützerbach
Kickelhahn with Ilmenau in the foreground

Among scattered foothills at its northern foot are the towns Eisenach, Gotha, Arnstadt and Ilmenau.

St. Elizabeth Church

Marburg

University town in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hesse, capital of the Marburg-Biedenkopf district (Landkreis).

University town in the German federal state (Bundesland) of Hesse, capital of the Marburg-Biedenkopf district (Landkreis).

St. Elizabeth Church
Marburg from Georg Braun and Frans Hogenberg's atlas Civitates orbis terrarum, 1572
Marburg on the Lahn
The Wettergasse in the Old City
Town hall and market place with fountain (January 2016)
Karl Knies
Adolf Fick

From the Gisos, it fell around that time to the Landgraves of Thuringia, residing on the Wartburg above Eisenach.

Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder

Martin Luther

German priest, theologian, author and hymnwriter.

German priest, theologian, author and hymnwriter.

Martin Luther (1529) by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Portraits of Hans and Margarethe Luther by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1527
Former monks' dormitory, St Augustine's Monastery, Erfurt
Luther as a friar, with tonsure
Luther's accommodation in Wittenberg
A posthumous portrait of Luther as an Augustinian friar
Luther's theses are engraved into the door of All Saints' Church, Wittenberg. The Latin inscription above informs the reader that the original door was destroyed by a fire, and that in 1857, King Frederick William IV of Prussia ordered a replacement be made.
The Catholic sale of indulgences shown in A Question to a Mintmaker, woodcut by Jörg Breu the Elder of Augsburg, c. 1530
Luther at Erfurt, which depicts Martin Luther discovering the doctrine of sola fide (by faith alone). Painting by Joseph Noel Paton, 1861.
Pope Leo X's Bull against the errors of Martin Luther, 1521, commonly known as Exsurge Domine
The meeting of Martin Luther (right) and Cardinal Cajetan (left, holding the book)
Luther Before the Diet of Worms by Anton von Werner (1843–1915)
Luther Monument in Worms. His statue is surrounded by the figures of his lay protectors and earlier Church reformers including John Wycliffe, Jan Hus and Girolamo Savonarola.
Wartburg Castle, Eisenach
The Wartburg room where Luther translated the New Testament into German. An original first edition is kept in the case on the desk.
Luther disguised as "Junker Jörg", 1521
Lutherhaus, Luther's residence in Wittenberg
The Twelve Articles, 1525
Katharina von Bora, Luther's wife, by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1526
Martin Luther at his desk with family portraits (17th century)
Church orders, Mecklenburg 1650
Lutheran church liturgy and sacraments
A stained glass portrayal of Luther
Luther's 1534 Bible
An early printing of Luther's hymn "Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott"
Luther on the left with Lazarus being raised by Jesus from the dead, painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder, 1558
Statue of Martin Luther outside St. Mary's Church, Berlin
The battle between the Turks and the Christians, in the 16th century
Pulpit of St. Andreas Church, Eisleben, where Agricola and Luther preached
The original title page of On the Jews and Their Lies, written by Martin Luther in 1543
Luther on his deathbed, painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder
Martin Luther's grave, Schlosskirche, Wittenberg
Worldwide Protestantism in 2010
Luther Monument in Eisenach, Germany
Martin Luther College in New Ulm, Minnesota, United States
Various books of the Weimar Edition of Luther's works
Martin Luther's Death House, considered the site of Luther's death since 1726. However the building where Luther actually died (at Markt 56, now the site of Hotel Graf von Mansfeld) was torn down in 1570.<ref>Dorfpredigten: Biblische Einsichten aus Deutschlands 'wildem Süden'. Ausgewählte Predigten aus den Jahren 1998 bis 2007 Teil II 2002–2007 by Thomas O.H. Kaiser, p. 354</ref>
Casts of Luther's face and hands at his death, in the Market Church in Halle<ref>Martin Luther's Death Mask on View at Museum in Halle, Germany artdaily.com</ref>
Schlosskirche in Wittenberg, where Luther posted his Ninety-five Theses, is also his gravesite.
Luther's tombstone beneath the pulpit in the Castle Church in Wittenberg
Close-up of the grave with inscription in Latin
Luther with a swan (painting in the church at Strümpfelbach im Remstal, Weinstadt, Germany, by J. A. List)
Swan weather vane, Round Lutheran Church, Amsterdam
Altar in St Martin's Church, Halberstadt, Germany. Luther and the swan are toward the top on the right.
Coin commemorating Luther (engraving by Georg Wilhelm Göbel, Saxony, 1706)

He sent Martin to Latin schools in Mansfeld, then Magdeburg in 1497, where he attended a school operated by a lay group called the Brethren of the Common Life, and Eisenach in 1498.

Hand-coloured aquatint of Telemann by Valentin Daniel Preisler, after a lost painting by Louis Michael Schneider, 1750

Georg Philipp Telemann

German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist.

German Baroque composer and multi-instrumentalist.

Hand-coloured aquatint of Telemann by Valentin Daniel Preisler, after a lost painting by Louis Michael Schneider, 1750
Magdeburg, Telemann's birthplace, in the early 18th century. Some 50 years before Telemann's birth the city was sacked and had to be rebuilt.
Telemann c. 1745, engraving by Georg Lichtensteger

He held important positions in Leipzig, Sorau, Eisenach, and Frankfurt before settling in Hamburg in 1721, where he became musical director of that city's five main churches.

Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach

Historical German state, created as a duchy in 1809 by the merger of the Ernestine duchies of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach, which had been in personal union since 1741.

Historical German state, created as a duchy in 1809 by the merger of the Ernestine duchies of Saxe-Weimar and Saxe-Eisenach, which had been in personal union since 1741.

Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach within the German Empire
Schloss Weimar
Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach within the German Empire
Wartburg Castle near Eisenach
Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach within the German Empire

The full grand ducal style was Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, Landgrave in Thuringia, Margrave of Meissen, Princely Count of Henneberg, Lord of Blankenhayn, Neustadt and Tautenburg.

Wartburg in Eisenach

Wartburg

Castle originally built in the Middle Ages.

Castle originally built in the Middle Ages.

Wartburg in Eisenach
View of Wartburg from the east
Map of the Wartburg: (1) access ramp, (2) redoubt, (3) drawbridge, (4) Torhaus (barbican), (5) Ritterhaus, (6) Vogtei and first courtyard, (7) Margarethengang, (8) Dirnitzlaube, (9) inner gatehouse, (10) Neue Kemenate, (11) stairs, (12) Bergfried, (13) Palas, (14) Ritterbad,(15) Gadem, (16) second courtyard with cistern (17) Südturm, (18) southern curtain wall, (19) kitchen garden, (20) Commandant's garden, (21) Elisabethengang, (22) Hotel auf der Wartburg
Schwind's Sängerkrieg fresco in the Sängersaal (1854)
The Luther Room
Wartburg, monk and nun, drawing by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1807)
Students marching to the Wartburg in 1817
Wartburg c. 1890–1900, seen from the south-west
The South Tower
View of the courtyard from the South Tower
Main gate seen from the first courtyard

It is situated on a precipice of 410 meters to the southwest of and overlooking the town of Eisenach, in the state of Thuringia, Germany.

St. Sebaldus Church, Nuremberg, which played an important role in Pachelbel's life

Johann Pachelbel

German composer, organist, and teacher who brought the south German organ schools to their peak.

German composer, organist, and teacher who brought the south German organ schools to their peak.

St. Sebaldus Church, Nuremberg, which played an important role in Pachelbel's life
Predigerkirche, the Erfurt church, where Pachelbel worked for 12 years, starting in 1678
Pachelbel's letter
Pachelbel's tomb at the St. Rochus Cemetery in Nuremberg
Example from "Wenn mein Stündlein vorhanden ist" of Pachelbel's chorales, bars 35–54. The chorale in the soprano is highlighted.
Fugue subjects from Magnificat fugues: secundi toni 7, octavi toni 10, primi toni 16, sexti toni 10, quarti toni 8 and octavi toni 13
A typical Pachelbel repercussion subject.
Excerpt from Magnificat Fugue octavi toni No. 12 (bars 15–18). Fugue subject that appears once in this excerpt is highlighted.
A page from the original printed edition of Hexachordum Apollinis, showing the fourth variation of the first aria
Excerpt from Toccata in D major (bars 10–14).
Opening bars of Toccata in C major. Two-voice motivic interplay, based on the melody introduced in the first bar, is reduced to consecutive thirds in the last two bars. The piece continues in a similar manner, with basic motivic interaction in two voices and occasional consecutive thirds or sixths.
Excerpt from the ending of motet Gott ist unser Zuversicht (bars 92–95). These are the first choir's parts, the notes and lines for the second choir are the same.

In 1677, Pachelbel moved to Eisenach, where he found employment as court organist under Kapellmeister Daniel Eberlin (also a native of Nuremberg), in the employ of Johann Georg I, Duke of Saxe-Eisenach.

Wilhelm Liebknecht and August Bebel commemorative postage stamp, East Germany, 1975

Social Democratic Workers' Party of Germany

Marxist socialist political party in the North German Confederation during unification.

Marxist socialist political party in the North German Confederation during unification.

Wilhelm Liebknecht and August Bebel commemorative postage stamp, East Germany, 1975
The Congress at Gotha centennial commemorative postage stamp, East Germany, 1975
Logo of the modern SPD

Founded in Eisenach in 1869, the SDAP endured through the early years of the German Empire.

Via Regia and Via Imperii

Via Regia

European Cultural Route following the route of the historic road of the Middle Ages.

European Cultural Route following the route of the historic road of the Middle Ages.

Via Regia and Via Imperii
Via Regia between Fulda and Neuhof in Hesse, Germany
Elisabethenstraße at Mainz-Kastel

The Via Regia ran west–east through the centre of the Holy Roman Empire, from the Rhine at Mainz-Kastel (Elisabethenstraße) to Frankfurt am Main, trade city and site of the election of the King of the Romans, continuing along Hanau, the Kaiserpfalz at Gelnhausen, the towns of Steinau an der Straße, Neuhof, Fulda and Eisenach to Erfurt, a centre of woad production.