Elaine Stritch

Elaine StrichElaine Stritch at LibertyElaine Stritch: At Liberty
Elaine Stritch (February 2, 1925 – July 17, 2014) was an American actress and singer, known for her work on Broadway.wikipedia
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Elaine Stritch at Liberty

Elaine Stritch: At Liberty
Her one-woman show Elaine Stritch at Liberty, won the 2002 Tony Award for Best Special Theatrical Event.
Elaine Stritch at Liberty is an autobiographical one-woman show written by Elaine Stritch and John Lahr, which is composed of anecdotes from Stritch's life and showtunes.

Sail Away (musical)

Sail AwaySail Away'' (musical)
Stritch made her Broadway debut in the 1946 comedy Loco and went on to receive four Tony Award nominations: for the William Inge play Bus Stop (1956); the Noël Coward musical Sail Away (1962); the Stephen Sondheim musical Company (1971), which included her performance of the song "The Ladies Who Lunch"; and for the revival of the Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996).
Elaine Stritch started in the show in a "relatively minor role and was only promoted over the title and given virtually all the best songs when it was reckoned that the leading lady...although excellent, was rather too operatic for a musical comedy."

Two's Company (TV series)

Two's CompanyTwo's Company'' (TV series)
She also starred with Donald Sinden in the ITV sitcom Two's Company (1975–79), which earned her a 1979 BAFTA TV Award nomination.
Produced by London Weekend Television for the ITV Network, the programme starred Elaine Stritch and Donald Sinden.

Company (musical)

CompanyCompany'' (musical)Company.
Stritch made her Broadway debut in the 1946 comedy Loco and went on to receive four Tony Award nominations: for the William Inge play Bus Stop (1956); the Noël Coward musical Sail Away (1962); the Stephen Sondheim musical Company (1971), which included her performance of the song "The Ladies Who Lunch"; and for the revival of the Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996).
Directed by Hal Prince, the opening cast included Dean Jones (who had replaced Anthony Perkins early in the rehearsal period when Perkins departed to direct a play), Donna McKechnie, Susan Browning, George Coe, Pamela Myers, Barbara Barrie, Charles Kimbrough, Merle Louise, Beth Howland, and Elaine Stritch.

A Delicate Balance (play)

A Delicate Balance1966 playA Delicate Balance'' (play)
Stritch made her Broadway debut in the 1946 comedy Loco and went on to receive four Tony Award nominations: for the William Inge play Bus Stop (1956); the Noël Coward musical Sail Away (1962); the Stephen Sondheim musical Company (1971), which included her performance of the song "The Ladies Who Lunch"; and for the revival of the Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996).
It was directed by Gerald Gutierrez, and starred Rosemary Harris as Agnes, George Grizzard as Tobias, John Carter as Harry, Elizabeth Wilson as Edna, Elaine Stritch as Claire, and Mary Beth Hurt as Julia.

Civilization (1947 song)

CivilizationBongo, bongo, bongo, I don't want to leave the CongoCivilization (Bongo Bongo Bongo)
However, her Broadway debut was in Loco in 1946, directed by Jed Harris, followed soon after by Made in Heaven (as a replacement) and then Angel in the Wings (1947), a revue in which she performed comedy sketches and the song "Civilization".
It was written by Bob Hilliard and Carl Sigman, published in 1947 later included in the 1947 Broadway musical Angel in the Wings, sung by Elaine Stritch.

Private Lives

IntimitaetenplayWhite Trash Private Lives
The reconstructed 'Sail Away' opened on Broadway at the Broadhurst Theatre on October 3, 1961", with Stritch giving what Howard Taubman of The New York Times said "must be the performance of her career." In 1966, she played Ruth Sherwood in the musical Wonderful Town at New York's City Center, and appeared in an Off Broadway revival of Private Lives in 1968.
The leading roles have attracted a wide range of actors; among those who have succeeded Coward as Elyot are Robert Stephens, Richard Burton, Alan Rickman and Matthew Macfadyen, and successors to Lawrence as Amanda have included Tallulah Bankhead, Elizabeth Taylor, Elaine Stritch, Maggie Smith, Kim Cattrall, Penelope Keith and Lindsay Duncan.

Dramatic Workshop

Dramatic Workshop and Technical InstituteWorkshop
She trained at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York City under Erwin Piscator, alongside Marlon Brando and Bea Arthur.
Among the faculty were Lee Strasberg and Stella Adler, among the students Robert De Niro, Marlon Brando, Tony Curtis, Walter Matthau, Tennessee Williams and Elaine Stritch.

Shirley Bonne

In the 1960 television season, Stritch appeared in the role of writer Ruth Sherwood in the CBS sitcom My Sister Eileen, opposite Shirley Bonne as her younger sister, Eileen Sherwood, an aspiring actress.
Bonne played an aspiring actress in New York City sharing an apartment with her older sister, Ruth Sherwood, a magazine writer played by Elaine Stritch.

30 Rock

TGS with Tracy Jordan30 Rock: The WebisodesThe Girlie Show'' (fictional show)
From 2007 to 2012, she had a recurring role as Colleen Donaghy on the NBC sitcom 30 Rock, a role that won her a third Emmy in 2007.
Guest stars include John McEnroe, Nathan Lane, Isabella Rossellini, Paul Reubens, Will Arnett, Wayne Brady, Elaine Stritch, Whoopi Goldberg, Conan O'Brien, LL Cool J, Rip Torn, and Ghostface Killah.

Donald Sinden

Sir Donald SindenDonald Alfred SindenDonald Sinden,
She also starred with Donald Sinden in the ITV sitcom Two's Company (1975–79), which earned her a 1979 BAFTA TV Award nomination.
Meanwhile, he was also portraying in repertory, Benedick (regarded as "the most admired Benedick in living memory") opposite Judi Dench's Beatrice in John Barton's highly acclaimed 'British Raj' revival of Much Ado About Nothing, and in the same time frame also rehearsing the third season of the LWT sitcom Two's Company with Elaine Stritch during the daytime and filming the show at the studio in front of a live audience on Sunday evenings.

Noël Coward

Noel CowardCowardSir Noël Coward
Stritch made her Broadway debut in the 1946 comedy Loco and went on to receive four Tony Award nominations: for the William Inge play Bus Stop (1956); the Noël Coward musical Sail Away (1962); the Stephen Sondheim musical Company (1971), which included her performance of the song "The Ladies Who Lunch"; and for the revival of the Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996).
Other examples of "Dad's Renaissance" included a 1968 Off-Broadway production of Private Lives at the Theatre de Lys starring Elaine Stritch, Lee Bowman and Betsy von Furstenberg, and directed by Charles Nelson Reilly.

The Honeymooners

Ralph KramdenEd NortonHoneymooners
She was the first and original Trixie Norton in a Honeymooners sketch with Jackie Gleason, Art Carney and Pert Kelton.
Elaine Stritch was the first and original Trixie Norton in a Honeymooners sketch with Jackie Gleason, Art Carney, and Pert Kelton.

Jed Harris

However, her Broadway debut was in Loco in 1946, directed by Jed Harris, followed soon after by Made in Heaven (as a replacement) and then Angel in the Wings (1947), a revue in which she performed comedy sketches and the song "Civilization".
However despised he may have been in the theatrical community, Harris directed and produced such luminaries as Leo G. Carroll, Laurence Olivier, Lillian Gish, Basil Rathbone, Elaine Stritch, Ruth Gordon, Walter Huston, Osgood Perkins and Katharine Hepburn.

The Gingerbread Lady

Stritch relocated to London in the 1970s and starred in several West End productions, including Tennessee Williams' Small Craft Warnings (1973) and Neil Simon's The Gingerbread Lady (1974).
In the UK, the play premiered at the Theatre Royal Windsor on June 25, 1974 with Elaine Stritch in the lead, and Vivien Merchant, Kevin Lindsay, Stephen Greif and Jenny Quayle in support.

Bus Stop (William Inge play)

Bus StopBus Stop (play)Bus Stop'' (William Inge play)
Stritch made her Broadway debut in the 1946 comedy Loco and went on to receive four Tony Award nominations: for the William Inge play Bus Stop (1956); the Noël Coward musical Sail Away (1962); the Stephen Sondheim musical Company (1971), which included her performance of the song "The Ladies Who Lunch"; and for the revival of the Edward Albee play A Delicate Balance (1996).
The play was nominated for four Tony Awards in 1956: Best Play (written by William Inge; produced by Robert Whitehead and Roger L. Stevens); Best Featured Actress in a Play (Elaine Stritch); Best Scenic Design (Boris Aronson); and Best Director (Harold Clurman).

Pal Joey (musical)

Pal Joey1940 stage musical comedymusical of the same name
Stritch understudied Ethel Merman for Call Me Madam, and, at the same time, appeared in the 1952 revival of Pal Joey, singing "Zip".
Lang and Segal starred, with Helen Gallagher as Gladys (for which Ms. Gallagher won the Tony Award for best featured actress that year), future Broadway star Elaine Stritch as Melba, and Bob Fosse as the understudy for Joey.

The New School

New SchoolNew School UniversityNew School for Social Research
She trained at the Dramatic Workshop of The New School in New York City under Erwin Piscator, alongside Marlon Brando and Bea Arthur.
Among the famous students of the Dramatic Workshop were Beatrice Arthur, Harry Belafonte, Marlon Brando, Tony Curtis, Ben Gazzara, Michael V. Gazzo, Rod Steiger, Elaine Stritch, Shelley Winters and Tennessee Williams.

British Academy Television Award for Best Entertainment Performance

Best Entertainment PerformanceBest Light Entertainment PerformanceBAFTA for Best Entertainment Performance
In 1979, both Stritch and Sinden were nominated for a BAFTA TV Award for Two's Company, in the category "Best Light Entertainment Performance", losing out to Ronnie Barker.

Jackie Gleason

GleasonactorHow sweet it is!
She was the first and original Trixie Norton in a Honeymooners sketch with Jackie Gleason, Art Carney and Pert Kelton.
Elaine Stritch had played the role as a tall and attractive blonde in the first sketch, but was quickly replaced by Randolph.

Call Me Madam

Musicalplaysame name
Stritch understudied Ethel Merman for Call Me Madam, and, at the same time, appeared in the 1952 revival of Pal Joey, singing "Zip".
She remained with the show for the entire run and appeared in the limited four-week engagement staged to celebrate the reopening of the National Theatre in Washington, D.C., but her understudy Elaine Stritch starred in the national tour.

Small Craft Warnings

Stritch relocated to London in the 1970s and starred in several West End productions, including Tennessee Williams' Small Craft Warnings (1973) and Neil Simon's The Gingerbread Lady (1974).
The play was produced in the West End at the Comedy Theatre in 1973, with Elaine Stritch, Peter Jones, George Pravda, Edward Judd, Frances de la Tour, James Berwick, Tony Beckley, Eric Deacon, and J M Bay.

Mame (musical)

MameAuntie MameMame'' (musical)
On tour and in stock, Stritch appeared in such musicals as No, No, Nanette, The King and I, I Married an Angel, and both as Vera Charles (opposite Janet Blair) and Mame Dennis in Mame.
Susan Hayward appeared in the Las Vegas production, while such stars as Ann Sothern, Janet Blair, Jane Russell, Elaine Stritch, Edie Adams, Patrice Munsel, Kitty Carlisle, Carol Lawrence, Shani Wallis, Juliet Prowse and Sheila Smith have appeared in stock, regional or touring productions.

Jackanory

Jackanory PlayhouseJackanory JuniorJack-a-Nory
She appeared on BBC 1's children's series, Jackanory, reading, among other stories, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl.

The Growing Paynes

Strich's earliest television appearances were in The Growing Paynes (1949) and the Goodyear Television Playhouse (1953–55).
Harvey and Parrish, who were husband and wife in real life, left the show in 1949 and were replaced by Edward Holmes and Elaine Stritch as Mr. and Mrs. Payne.