Electric Vehicle Company

Electric VehicleThe Electric Vehicle Company
Electric Vehicle Company was an American automobile holding company and early pioneering manufacturer of automobiles.wikipedia
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Isaac Rice

Isaac Leopold RiceIsaac L. RiceIsaac L. Rice and Julia B. Rice House
The Electric Vehicle Company was founded 27 September 1897 as a holding company of battery-powered electric vehicle manufacturers made up of several companies assembled by Isaac Rice.
Some of the numerous other companies Rice organized or was involved in included the Electric Vehicle Company, Car Lighting and Power Company, American Casein Company, and the Consolidated Rubber Tire Company.

Electrobat

Morris & SalomElectrobat IIHenry G. Morris, Pedro G. Salom
Their vehicles were constructed by Henry G. Morris and Pedro G. Salom, builders of the Electrobats, the first truly useful electric automobiles in the USA.
They sold the cabs and their concept to Isaac L. Rice, who reincorporated the enterprise as the Electric Vehicle Company (Elizabethport, New Jersey), in 1897, and later became part of Pope's empire.

Columbia (automobile brand)

Columbia Automobile CompanyColumbiaColumbia Electric
Whitney brought in industrial leader Albert Augustus Pope now, who brought the Columbia Automobile Company.
They included the Pope Manufacturing Company of Hartford, Connecticut, the Electric Vehicle Company, and an entity of brief existence in 1899, the Columbia Automobile Company.

Riker Electric Vehicle Company

Riker ElectricRikerRiker Motor Vehicle Company
The trust was reorganized as the parent company of several vehicle manufacturers, among them Columbia and the Riker Electric Vehicle Company, which was acquired in 1902.
Designed by Andrew L. Riker, they were built in small numbers until the company was absorbed by the Electric Vehicle Company in 1901.

Albert Augustus Pope

Albert PopeAlbert A. PopeColonel Albert Pope
Whitney brought in industrial leader Albert Augustus Pope now, who brought the Columbia Automobile Company.
In 1897, he renamed the Motor Carriage Department as the separate Columbia Automobile Company, which was spun off and sold to the Electric Vehicle Company, in which he was also an investor.

George B. Selden

Selden patentGeorge Baldwin SeldenGeorge Selden
Electric Vehicle's chief asset was now the holding of the Selden Patent which established a right to royalties from all manufacturers of internal combustion engine vehicles.
In 1899 he sold his patent rights to William C. Whitney, who proposed manufacturing electric-powered taxicabs as the Electric Vehicle Company, EVC, for a royalty of US$15 per car with a minimum annual payment of US$5,000.

List of defunct automobile manufacturers of the United States

List of defunct United States automobile manufacturersList of defunct automobile manufacturersdefunct American automobile company

Manhattan

Manhattan, New YorkManhattan, New York CityNew York
Twelve of these cabs were in use in Manhattan in January, 1897.

Syndicate

syndicatesbanking syndicatecombine
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

William Collins Whitney

William C. WhitneyWilliam WhitneyW. C. Whitney
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Thomas Fortune Ryan

Thomas F. Ryan
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Anthony N. Brady

Brady
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Peter Arrell Browne Widener

Peter A. B. WidenerPeter Arrell Brown WidenerPeter A.B. Widener
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Philadelphia

Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaPhiladelphia, PACity of Philadelphia
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Washington, D.C.

Washington, DCWashington D.C.District of Columbia
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Boston

Boston, MassachusettsBoston, MABoston, United States
The company was taken over in 1899 by a syndicate around William C. Whitney, Thomas Fortune Ryan Anthony N. Brady, and P. A. B. Widener, thus forming the so-called "Lead Cab Trust," which hoped to develop a monopoly by placing electric cabs on the streets of major American cities, starting with New York City, Philadelphia, Chicago, Washington, D.C., and Boston.

Oldsmobile

OldsOlds Motor WorksOlds Motor Vehicle Company
Although by 1899, E.V.C. was the largest motor car manufacturer in the USA - a position lost to Oldsmobile in 1901 - this policy failed soon, as it was even then not able to sell as many vehicles as necessary for the task.

Royalty payment

royaltiesroyaltyroyalty payments
Electric Vehicle's chief asset was now the holding of the Selden Patent which established a right to royalties from all manufacturers of internal combustion engine vehicles.

Internal combustion engine

engineinternal combustioninternal combustion engines
Electric Vehicle's chief asset was now the holding of the Selden Patent which established a right to royalties from all manufacturers of internal combustion engine vehicles.

Brayton cycle

BraytonBrayton engineJoule cycle
The patent was valid until 1913, but lost its worth as the appellation court reduced it to vehicles with Brayton engines, of which none was used in a motor vehicle.

Ray Harroun

Other drivers in both years included Bert Holcomb (who was in charge of the runs), Lawrence Duffie (Demonstrator of the Gasoline Dept of Electric Vehicle Company, which manufactured Columbia cars), and Harry Sandol.

Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers

A.L.A.M.A.L.A.MALAM
The Association of Licensed Automobile Manufacturers (ALAM), began as the Manufacturer's Mutual Association (MMA), an organization originally formed to challenge the litigation of the fledgling automobile industry by George B. Selden and the Electric Vehicle Company.

History of the electric vehicle

electric carGolden Ageelectric
The company ran until 1898 with up to 62 cabs operating until it was reformed by its financiers to form the Electric Vehicle Company.