Electrical engineering

electrical engineerelectricalElectrical and Electronics EngineeringElectrical and Computer EngineeringElectrical & Electronics Engineeringelectrical engineersElectrical and Electronic EngineeringElectronics and Communications Engineeringelectronics and communication engineeringelectrotechnics
Electrical engineering is an engineering discipline concerned with the study, design and application of equipment, devices and systems which use electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism.wikipedia
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Signal processing

signal analysissignalsignal processor
Electrical engineering is now divided into a wide range of fields including, computer engineering, power engineering, telecommunications, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and electronics.
Signal processing is an electrical engineering subfield that focuses on analysing, modifying and synthesizing signals such as sound, images and biological measurements.

Electricity

electricalelectricelectrically
Electrical engineering is an engineering discipline concerned with the study, design and application of equipment, devices and systems which use electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism.
Even then, practical applications for electricity were few, and it would not be until the late nineteenth century that electrical engineers were able to put it to industrial and residential use.

Power engineering

Electrical Power Engineeringpower engineerPower Systems Engineering
Electrical engineering is now divided into a wide range of fields including, computer engineering, power engineering, telecommunications, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and electronics.
Power engineering draws the majority of its theoretical base from electrical engineering.

International Electrotechnical Commission

IECInternational Electrotechnical Commission (IEC)(IEC)
These include the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (formerly the IEE).
The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC; in French: Commission électrotechnique internationale) is an international standards organization that prepares and publishes international standards for all electrical, electronic and related technologies – collectively known as "electrotechnology".

Computer engineering

computer engineerComputerengineering
Electrical engineering is now divided into a wide range of fields including, computer engineering, power engineering, telecommunications, radio-frequency engineering, signal processing, instrumentation, and electronics.
Computer engineers usually have training in electronic engineering (or electrical engineering), software design, and hardware-software integration instead of only software engineering or electronic engineering.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

IEEEFellow of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics EngineersTechnical Field Award
These include the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Institution of Engineering and Technology (IET) (formerly the IEE).
The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) is a professional association for electronic engineering and electrical engineering (and associated disciplines) with its corporate office in New York City and its operations center in Piscataway, New Jersey.

Glossary of electrical and electronics engineering

See glossary of electrical and electronics engineering.
This glossary of electrical and electronics engineering pertains specifically to electrical and electronics engineering.

William Gilbert (physician)

William GilbertGilbert, WilliamWilliam Gilbert (astronomer)
William Gilbert was a prominent early electrical scientist, and was the first to draw a clear distinction between magnetism and static electricity.
He is regarded by some as the father of electrical engineering or electricity and magnetism.

Electrical conductor

conductorconductiveconductors
Notable developments in this century include the work of Hans Christian Ørsted who discovered in 1820 that an electric current produces a magnetic field that will deflect a compass needle, of William Sturgeon who, in 1825 invented the electromagnet, of Joseph Henry and Edward Davy who invented the electrical relay in 1835, of Georg Ohm, who in 1827 quantified the relationship between the electric current and potential difference in a conductor, of Michael Faraday (the discoverer of electromagnetic induction in 1831), and of James Clerk Maxwell, who in 1873 published a unified theory of electricity and magnetism in his treatise Electricity and Magnetism.
In physics and electrical engineering, a conductor is an object or type of material that allows the flow of charge (electrical current) in one or more directions.

James Clerk Maxwell

MaxwellJ. C. MaxwellJames Maxwell
Notable developments in this century include the work of Hans Christian Ørsted who discovered in 1820 that an electric current produces a magnetic field that will deflect a compass needle, of William Sturgeon who, in 1825 invented the electromagnet, of Joseph Henry and Edward Davy who invented the electrical relay in 1835, of Georg Ohm, who in 1827 quantified the relationship between the electric current and potential difference in a conductor, of Michael Faraday (the discoverer of electromagnetic induction in 1831), and of James Clerk Maxwell, who in 1873 published a unified theory of electricity and magnetism in his treatise Electricity and Magnetism.
Maxwell is also regarded as a founder of the modern field of electrical engineering.

Technische Universität Darmstadt

Darmstadt University of TechnologyTechnical University of DarmstadtTechnische Hochschule Darmstadt
The Technische Universität Darmstadt founded the world's first department of electrical engineering in 1882 and introduced the first degree course in electrical engineering in 1883.
In 1882, it was the first university in the world to set up a chair in electrical engineering.

Electromechanics

electromechanicalelectro-mechanicalElectromechanical Engineering
During these years, the study of electricity was largely considered to be a subfield of physics since the early electrical technology was considered electromechanical in nature.
In engineering, electromechanics combines processes and procedures drawn from electrical engineering and mechanical engineering.

Nikola Tesla

TeslaNicola TeslaTesla, Nikola
Practical AC motor designs including induction motors were independently invented by Galileo Ferraris and Nikola Tesla and further developed into a practical three-phase form by Mikhail Dolivo-Dobrovolsky and Charles Eugene Lancelot Brown.
Nikola Tesla (10 July 1856 – 7 January 1943) was a Serbian-American inventor, electrical engineer, mechanical engineer, and futurist who is best known for his contributions to the design of the modern alternating current (AC) electricity supply system.

Submarine communications cable

submarine cablesubmarine telecommunications cable systemsubmarine telegraph cable
By the end of the 19th century, the world had been forever changed by the rapid communication made possible by the engineering development of land-lines, submarine cables, and, from about 1890, wireless telegraphy.
India rubber had been tried by Moritz von Jacobi, the Prussian electrical engineer, as far back as the early 19th century.

Ottó Bláthy

Ottó Titusz BláthyBláthy, OttóOtto Blathy
Alternating current, with its ability to transmit power more efficiently over long distances via the use of transformers, developed rapidly in the 1880s and 1890s with transformer designs by Károly Zipernowsky, Ottó Bláthy and Miksa Déri (later called ZBD transformers), Lucien Gaulard, John Dixon Gibbs and William Stanley, Jr..
Ottó Titusz Bláthy (11 August 1860 – 26 September 1939) was a Hungarian electrical engineer.

Charles Proteus Steinmetz

Charles SteinmetzCharles P. SteinmetzC. P. Steinmetz
Charles Steinmetz and Oliver Heaviside contributed to the theoretical basis of alternating current engineering.
Charles Proteus Steinmetz (born Karl August Rudolph Steinmetz, April 9, 1865 – October 26, 1923) was a German-born American mathematician and electrical engineer and professor at Union College.

Oliver Heaviside

HeavisideHeaviside, OliverHeaviside|Heaviside's operators
Charles Steinmetz and Oliver Heaviside contributed to the theoretical basis of alternating current engineering.
Oliver Heaviside FRS (18 May 1850 – 3 February 1925) was an English self-taught electrical engineer, mathematician, and physicist who adapted complex numbers to the study of electrical circuits, invented mathematical techniques for the solution of differential equations (equivalent to Laplace transforms), reformulated Maxwell's field equations in terms of electric and magnetic forces and energy flux, and independently co-formulated vector analysis.

Charles Algernon Parsons

Charles ParsonsSir Charles ParsonsParsons
In 1884, Sir Charles Parsons invented the steam turbine allowing for more efficient electric power generation.
He worked as an engineer on dynamo and turbine design, and power generation, with great influence on the naval and electrical engineering fields.

Guglielmo Marconi

MarconiMarconi WirelessMarconi's Wireless Telegraph Company
In 1895, Guglielmo Marconi began work on a way to adapt the known methods of transmitting and detecting these "Hertzian waves" into a purpose built commercial wireless telegraphic system.
Guglielmo Marconi, 1st Marquis of Marconi FRSA (25 April 1874 – 20 July 1937) was an Italian inventor and electrical engineer, known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission, development of Marconi's law, and a radio telegraph system.

Engineering

engineerengineersengineered
Electrical engineering is an engineering discipline concerned with the study, design and application of equipment, devices and systems which use electricity, electronics, and electromagnetism.
The foundations of electrical engineering in the 1800s included the experiments of Alessandro Volta, Michael Faraday, Georg Ohm and others and the invention of the electric telegraph in 1816 and the electric motor in 1872.

Galileo Ferraris

Ferraris, Galileo
Practical AC motor designs including induction motors were independently invented by Galileo Ferraris and Nikola Tesla and further developed into a practical three-phase form by Mikhail Dolivo-Dobrovolsky and Charles Eugene Lancelot Brown.
Galileo Ferraris (31 October 1847 – 7 February 1897) was an Italian physicist and electrical engineer, one of the pioneers of AC power system and an inventor of the three-phase induction motor.

John Ambrose Fleming

Ambrose FlemingSir Ambrose FlemingSir John Ambrose Fleming
John Fleming invented the first radio tube, the diode, in 1904.
Sir John Ambrose Fleming FRS (29 November 1849 – 18 April 1945) was an English electrical engineer and physicist who invented the first thermionic valve or vacuum tube, designed the radio transmitter with which the first transatlantic radio transmission was made, and also established the right-hand rule used in physics.

Institution of Electrical Engineers

IEEInstitute of Electrical EngineersFIEE
Over 50 years later, he joined the new Society of Telegraph Engineers (soon to be renamed the Institution of Electrical Engineers) where he was regarded by other members as the first of their cohort.
The Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE) was a British professional organisation of electronics, electrical, manufacturing, and Information Technology professionals, especially electrical engineers.

J. Presper Eckert

John Presper EckertEckertPresper Eckert
In 1946, the ENIAC (Electronic Numerical Integrator and Computer) of John Presper Eckert and John Mauchly followed, beginning the computing era.
John Adam Presper "Pres" Eckert Jr. (April 9, 1919 – June 3, 1995) was an American electrical engineer and computer pioneer.

Miksa Déri

DériDéri, MiksaDeri
Alternating current, with its ability to transmit power more efficiently over long distances via the use of transformers, developed rapidly in the 1880s and 1890s with transformer designs by Károly Zipernowsky, Ottó Bláthy and Miksa Déri (later called ZBD transformers), Lucien Gaulard, John Dixon Gibbs and William Stanley, Jr..
Miksa Déri (27 October 1854 November, Bács, Kingdom of Hungary, (now: Bač, Serbia) – 3 March 1938) was a Hungarian electrical engineer, inventor, power plant builder.