Electrical injury

electric shockelectrocutionelectrocutedelectric shockselectrical shockshockelectrocutingelectrical shockselectrical hazardselectrocute
Electrical injury is a physiological reaction caused by electric current passing through the (human) body.wikipedia
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Electrical wiring

wiringbuilding wiringelectrical cables
Physical contact with energized wiring or devices is the most common cause of an electric shock.
Wiring installation codes and regulations are intended to protect people and property from electrical shock and fire hazards.

Electricity

electricalelectricelectrically
Electric shock occurs upon contact of a (human) body part with any source of electricity that causes a sufficient magnitude of current to pass through the victim's flesh, viscera or hair.
Several ancient writers, such as Pliny the Elder and Scribonius Largus, attested to the numbing effect of electric shocks delivered by catfish and electric rays, and knew that such shocks could travel along conducting objects.

Electrocution

electrocutedelectrocuteelectrocuting
If death results from an electric shock the cause of death is generally referred to as electrocution.
Electrocution is death or serious injury caused by electric shock, electric current passing through the body.

Ventricular fibrillation

fibrillationventricular fibrillation VFa heart defect
A domestic power supply voltage (110 or 230 V), 50 or 60 Hz alternating current (AC) through the chest for a fraction of a second may induce ventricular fibrillation at currents as low as 30 mA. With direct current (DC), 300 to 500 mA is required.
Ventricular fibrillation can occur due to coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, cardiomyopathy, Brugada syndrome, long QT syndrome, electric shock, or intracranial hemorrhage.

Death

mortalitydeaddeceased
Still larger currents usually result in tissue damage and may trigger fibrillation of the heart or cardiac arrest, any of which may ultimately be fatal.
In cases of electric shock, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) for an hour or longer can allow stunned nerves to recover, allowing an apparently dead person to survive.

Alternating current

ACalternating-currentalternating
The minimum current a human can feel depends on the current type (AC or DC) as well as frequency for AC. A person can feel at least 1 mA (rms) of AC at 60 Hz, while at least 5 mA for DC. At around 10 milliamperes, AC current passing through the arm of a 68 kg human can cause powerful muscle contractions; the victim is unable to voluntarily control muscles and cannot release an electrified object. The comparison between the dangers of alternating current at typical power transmission frequences (i.e., 50 or 60 Hz), and direct current has been a subject of debate ever since the War of Currents in the 1880s.
This significantly reduces the risk of electric shock in the event that one of the live conductors becomes exposed through an equipment fault whilst still allowing a reasonable voltage of 110 V between the two conductors for running the tools.

Electric current

currentcurrentselectrical current
Electrical injury is a physiological reaction caused by electric current passing through the (human) body.
Electric shock

Voltage

potential differenceVvoltages
In cases of exposure to high voltages, such as on a power transmission tower, physical contact with energized wiring or objects may not be necessary to cause electric shock, as the voltage may be sufficient to "jump" the air gap between the electrical device and the victim. If the voltage is less than 200 V, then the human skin, more precisely the stratum corneum, is the main contributor to the impedance of the body in the case of a macroshock—the passing of current between two contact points on the skin.
Electric shock

Static electricity

staticstatic chargestatic electric
Assuming a steady current flow (as opposed to a shock from a capacitor or from static electricity), shocks above 2,700 volts are often fatal, with those above 11,000 volts being usually fatal, though exceptional cases have been noted.
Anti-static shoes should not be confused with insulating shoes, which provide exactly the opposite benefit some protection against serious electric shocks from the mains voltage.

High voltage

high-voltageEHTextra high voltage
High voltage (over about 600 volts). In addition to greater current flow, high voltage may cause dielectric breakdown at the skin, thus lowering skin resistance and allowing further increased current flow.
The voltage at which there is the danger of electrocution depends on the electrical conductivity of dry human skin.

Electroshock weapon

stun gunTaserstun guns
Electroshock weapons are incapacitant weapons used for subduing a person by administering electric shock to disrupt superficial muscle functions.
It delivers an electric shock aimed at temporarily disrupting muscle functions and/or inflicting pain without causing significant injury.

Electric fence

electric fencingelectric fenceselectrified
Electric fences are barriers that uses electric shocks to deter animals or people from crossing a boundary.
An electric fence is a barrier that uses electric shocks to deter animals and people from crossing a boundary.

Picana

Other methods of electrical torture (such as the picana) do not use a fixed wire but the prod has two electrodes of different polarity a short distance apart so as to make a circuit through the flesh between them when it is placed on the body, thus making it easy for the operator to target the shocks accurately in the places that cause the victim most pain and distress.
The picana or picana electrica is a device used to give an electric shock during electrical torture.

Parrilla (torture)

parrillaelectric shock treatmentLa Parrilla
The parrilla is an example of this technique.
The parrilla is a method of torture where the victim is strapped to a metal frame and subjected to electric shock.

Electric chair

electrocutionelectrocuteddeath by electrocution
(This is borne out by some limited self-experimentation by early designers of the electric chair and by research from the field of animal husbandry, where electric stunning has been extensively studied).
Electric shock

Shocking gum

Shock Gum
Mild electric shocks are also used for entertainment, especially as a practical joke for example in such devices as a shocking pen or a shocking gum.
Shocking gum is a practical joke device that delivers a mild electric shock.

Aversives

aversiveaversive stimuliaversive stimulus
As an aversive punishment for conditioning of developmentally delayed individuals with severe behavioral problems. This controversial skin-shock method is employed only at the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center, a special needs school in Massachusetts.
Examples include extreme heat or cold, bitter flavors, electric shocks, loud noises and pain.

Artificial cardiac pacemaker

pacemakerpacemakersartificial pacemaker
Medical implants. Artificial cardiac pacemakers or implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICD) are sensitive to very small currents.
A substantial external device using vacuum tube technology to provide transcutaneous pacing, it was somewhat crude and painful to the patient in use and, being powered from an AC wall socket, carried a potential hazard of electrocution of the patient and inducing ventricular fibrillation.

Judge Rotenberg Educational Center

Judge Rotenberg Center
As an aversive punishment for conditioning of developmentally delayed individuals with severe behavioral problems. This controversial skin-shock method is employed only at the Judge Rotenberg Educational Center, a special needs school in Massachusetts.
JRC's goals include a near-zero rejection/expulsion policy regardless of severity of behaviors and/or disability; active treatment with a behavioral approach directed exclusively towards normalization; frequent use of behavioral rewards and occasional use of punishments; minimal or zero use of psychotropic medications; video monitoring of staff; and the option to use aversives, including electric shocks on the skin using a device called a Graduated Electronic Decelerator (GED).

Ampere

AmAamp
The minimum current a human can feel depends on the current type (AC or DC) as well as frequency for AC. A person can feel at least 1 mA (rms) of AC at 60 Hz, while at least 5 mA for DC. At around 10 milliamperes, AC current passing through the arm of a 68 kg human can cause powerful muscle contractions; the victim is unable to voluntarily control muscles and cannot release an electrified object.
Electric shock

Macroshock

If the voltage is less than 200 V, then the human skin, more precisely the stratum corneum, is the main contributor to the impedance of the body in the case of a macroshock—the passing of current between two contact points on the skin.
Electric shock

War of the currents

war of currentsalternating current powerbattle of currents
The comparison between the dangers of alternating current at typical power transmission frequences (i.e., 50 or 60 Hz), and direct current has been a subject of debate ever since the War of Currents in the 1880s.
At the time it was felt that 100 volts was not likely to present a severe hazard of fatal electric shock.

Electrical burn

electrical
Electrical burn
In extreme cases, electricity can cause shock to the brain, strain to the heart, and injury to other organs.

Milgram experiment

MilgramMilgram obedience experimentobedience to authority
Milgram experiment
At some point prior to the actual test, the teacher was given a sample electric shock from the electroshock generator in order to experience firsthand what the shock that the learner would supposedly receive during the experiment would feel like.