Electrification of Caltrain

Peninsula Corridor Electrification Projecta project to electrify their service corridor between San Jose and San FranciscoCaltrain ElectrificationCaltrain Modernization ProjectCommunications Based Overlay Signal Systemelectrificationelectrification of Caltrain serviceelectrification of its Peninsula Commute lineelectrification of the corridorelectrification of the line
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).wikipedia
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Downtown Rail Extension

a new or relocated stationrailway tunnel
According to Caltrain, electrification of the tracks will allow it to improve service times via faster acceleration and shorter headways, reduce air pollution and noise, and facilitate a future railway tunnel into downtown San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center (as diesel trains cannot serve underground stations).
Because DTX uses a long tunnel, current diesel locomotives are not suitable and the Caltrain Modernization Project (CalMod), which includes electrification of the line and acquisition of electrified rolling stock, is a prerequisite.

California High-Speed Rail

California High Speed RailCalifornia High Speed Rail AuthorityCalifornia High-Speed Rail Authority
For two decades, the project lay dormant due to lack of funding until Caltrain agreed to share its tracks with the California High-Speed Rail Authority (CHSRA), which was looking for a route for the constitutionally mandated San Jose—San Francisco segment. Funding for the $1.9 billion project comes from a mix of funds contributed by the California Department of Transportation, California High-Speed Rail Authority, California cap and trade revenue, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the city and county of San Francisco, SamTrans, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.
Simultaneously with the ICS construction, there are "bookend" and connectivity investments including electrification of the San Francisco Peninsula Corridor used by Caltrain, improvements to tracks and signaling for both Metrolink in the LA area and Caltrain, and better passenger interconnections for Caltrain, Amtrak, and other Northern California rail lines.

Caltrain

Peninsula Corridor Joint Powers BoardPeninsula SubdivisionCaltran
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).
The official grant was finally signed on May 23, and Caltrain broke ground for the Peninsula Corridor Electrification Project on July 21, 2017 in a ceremony attended by local and state officials at the Millbrae station.

EMD AEM-7

AEM-7AEM-7 locomotivesAEM7
The 1992 Feasibility Study proposed replacing the existing diesel-electric locomotives with either a fleet of EMD AEM-7 electric locomotives to move the existing gallery passenger cars or Metro North Budd M-2/M-4 EMUs.
Caltrain, which operates commuter trains in the San Francisco Bay Area, purchased two retired Amtrak AEM-7s to test their electrification system once completed.

Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority

VTASanta Clara VTAVTA Bus
Funding for the $1.9 billion project comes from a mix of funds contributed by the California Department of Transportation, California High-Speed Rail Authority, California cap and trade revenue, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the city and county of San Francisco, SamTrans, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority.
2000 Measure A also includes funding for light rail extensions, bus service expansion, expansion and electrification of Caltrain service, and connections from San Jose International Airport to BART, Caltrain and VTA light rail.

Dumbarton Rail Corridor

Under the latest proposal to revive rail service over the Dumbarton Rail Corridor, diesel multiple units would first be used to establish Dumbarton Rail service as a rail shuttle between a new rail station in Newark and Caltrain's Redwood City station, later extending service from Newark to Union City, and finally followed by a commuter rail operation running from Union City to San Francisco and San Jose using EMUs.
$35 million, which would be redistributed with $20 million going to Caltrain Electrification and $15 million going to replace Dumbarton Express buses.

Tamien station

TamienTamien Caltrain and LRT station
When completed, CalMod will electrify 51 mi of tracks between 4th and King station and Tamien station and install a PTC management system along the tracks.
Caltrain is set to be electrified from San Francisco to Tamien by 2022.

Railway platform height

platform heighthigh-level platformhigh-level platforms
Because the existing Caltrain platforms are at a different height compared to proposed high-speed rail vehicles, the EMU trains will be equipped with doors at two heights, at 22 in and 50.5 in above-top-of-rail, allowing Caltrain to eventually transition from the existing 8 in low platforms to CHSRA-compatible high platforms, enabling unassisted boarding of all passengers as specified by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.

Positive train control

PTCIncremental Train Control SystemPositive Train Control (PTC)
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Railway electrification system

electrifiedelectrificationelectric railway
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Commuter rail in North America

commuter railcommuter railroadcommuter train
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

San Francisco Peninsula

PeninsulaThe Peninsulaa long peninsula
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Silicon Valley

Silicon Valley, CaliforniaSan JoseSan Francisco Bay Area technology industry
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Diesel locomotive

diesel-electric locomotivedieseldiesel locomotives
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Electric multiple unit

EMUelectric multiple unitsEMUs
The Caltrain Modernization Program (CalMod) is a $1.9 billion project that will add a positive train control (PTC) system and electrify the main line of the U.S. commuter railroad Caltrain, which serves cities in the San Francisco Peninsula and Silicon Valley, as well as transition from its current diesel-electric locomotive powered trains to electric multiple units (EMU).

Headway

frequencyservice frequencycapacity
According to Caltrain, electrification of the tracks will allow it to improve service times via faster acceleration and shorter headways, reduce air pollution and noise, and facilitate a future railway tunnel into downtown San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center (as diesel trains cannot serve underground stations).

Financial District, San Francisco

Financial Districtdowntown San FranciscoDowntown
According to Caltrain, electrification of the tracks will allow it to improve service times via faster acceleration and shorter headways, reduce air pollution and noise, and facilitate a future railway tunnel into downtown San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center (as diesel trains cannot serve underground stations).

Transbay Transit Center

Salesforce Transit CenterSan Franciscobuilding issues
According to Caltrain, electrification of the tracks will allow it to improve service times via faster acceleration and shorter headways, reduce air pollution and noise, and facilitate a future railway tunnel into downtown San Francisco's Transbay Transit Center (as diesel trains cannot serve underground stations).

California Department of Transportation

CaltransCalifornia Division of HighwaysCalifornia Department of Transportation (Caltrans)
Funding for the $1.9 billion project comes from a mix of funds contributed by the California Department of Transportation, California High-Speed Rail Authority, California cap and trade revenue, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, Metropolitan Transportation Commission, the city and county of San Francisco, SamTrans, and Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority. Proposals for electrifying the line began as early as 1992, when the California Department of Transportation conducted an early feasibility study.

Groundbreaking

broke groundgroundbreaking ceremonyGround was broken
Construction contracts for electrification were awarded on July 2016 and groundbreaking was expected to occur in March 2017, but was delayed when the new United States Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao indefinitely deferred federal funding just before construction was about to begin.

Elaine Chao

Construction contracts for electrification were awarded on July 2016 and groundbreaking was expected to occur in March 2017, but was delayed when the new United States Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao indefinitely deferred federal funding just before construction was about to begin.

Federal Transit Administration

Urban Mass Transportation AdministrationUrban Mass Transit AdministrationFTA
In May 2017, the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) announced its intention to sign the grant and reversed Secretary Chao's deferment.

San Francisco 4th and King Street station

San Francisco4th and King StationCaltrain Depot
When completed, CalMod will electrify 51 mi of tracks between 4th and King station and Tamien station and install a PTC management system along the tracks.

Federal Railroad Administration

FRAFederal Railway AdministrationFederal Railroad Administrator
PTC is designed to fulfill federal safety mandates for passenger rail and is part of the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) waiver to use EMUs on tracks shared with freight traffic.

Stadler KISS

RABe 511RABe 511 classStadler DOSTO
Caltrain plans to complete the project by 2021, after which it plans to use Stadler KISS double-decker EMU trainsets on the electrified route.