Electro (music)

electroelectro musicelectro-funkelectro funkelectro-discoelectronicelecto funkelectro-soulNeo-electroElectro-Boogie
Electro (or electro-funk) is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk.wikipedia
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Funk

funk musicfunkysynth-funk
Electro (or electro-funk) is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk.
Funk derivatives include the psychedelic funk of Sly Stone and George Clinton; the avant-funk of groups such as Talking Heads and the Pop Group; boogie, a form of post-disco dance music; electro music, a hybrid of electronic music and funk; funk metal (e.g., Living Colour, Faith No More); G-funk, a mix of gangsta rap and funk; Timba, a form of funky Cuban popular dance music; and funk jam.

Yellow Magic Orchestra

YMORescue / Rydeen 79/07The City of Light / Tokyo Town Pages
Early hip hop and rap combined with German and Japanese electropop influences such as Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra (YMO) inspired the birth of electro.
They are credited with playing a key role in the development of several electronic genres, including synthpop, J-pop, electro, and techno, while exploring subversive sociopolitical themes throughout their career.

Boogie (genre)

boogieelectro-funkelectro-boogie
It also palpably deviates from its predecessor boogie for being less vocal-oriented and more focused on electronic beats produced by drum machines. Boogie played a role during the formative years of electro, notably "Feels Good" by Electra (Emergency – EMDS-6527), the post-disco production "You're the One for Me" by D. Train (Prelude – PRL D 621), and the Eric Matthew/Darryl Payne productions "Thanks to You" by Sinnamon (Becket – BKD 508), and "On A Journey (I Sing The Funk Electric)" by Electrik Funk (Prelude – PRL D 541).
The sound of boogie defined by bridging acoustic and electronic musical instruments with emphasis on vocals and miscellaneous effects later evolved into electro and house music.

Afrika Bambaataa

Afrika BambaataAfrica BambaataaAfrikaa Bambaataa
In 1982, producer Arthur Baker with Afrika Bambaataa released the seminal "Planet Rock", which was built using samples from Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express (1977) and drum beats supplied by the TR-808.
He is notable for releasing a series of genre-defining electro tracks in the 1980s that influenced the development of hip hop culture.

Herbie Hancock

HancockHerbieHancock, Herbie
In 1983, Hashim created an electro funk sound which influenced Herbie Hancock, resulting in his hit single "Rockit".
In the 1970s, Hancock experimented with jazz fusion, funk, and electro styles.

Planet Rock (song)

Planet RockDon't Stop... Planet RockJust hit me!
In 1982, producer Arthur Baker with Afrika Bambaataa released the seminal "Planet Rock", which was built using samples from Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express (1977) and drum beats supplied by the TR-808.
The new musical style on the album later became known as Electro, which icy synthesizer melodies and harder funk-oriented backing.

Electropop

electro-popelectronic popelectro pop
Early hip hop and rap combined with German and Japanese electropop influences such as Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra (YMO) inspired the birth of electro.
During the early 1980s, British artists such as Gary Numan, the Human League, Soft Cell, John Foxx and Visage helped pioneer a new synth-pop style that drew more heavily from electronic music and emphasized primary usage of synthesizers, while the electro style was largely developed by Afrika Bambaataa, who was heavily influenced by Yellow Magic Orchestra and Kraftwerk, and in turn influenced the 1980s pop music style of Madonna.

Hip hop music

Hip hophip-hoprap
Electro (or electro-funk) is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk.
The Planet Rock sound also spawned a hip-hop electronic dance trend, electro music, which included songs such as Planet Patrol's "Play at Your Own Risk" (1982), C Bank's "One More Shot" (1982), Cerrone's "Club Underworld" (1984), Shannon's "Let the Music Play" (1983), Freeez's "I.O.U."

Warp 9

Planet Rock was followed later that year by another breakthrough electro record, Nunk by Warp 9. Electro hip hop group Warp 9's 1983 single, Light Years Away, produced and written by Lotti Golden and Richard Scher, exemplifies the Sci-Fi, afrofuturist aspect of electro, reflected in both the lyrics and instrumentation. Electro hip hop releases in 1982 include songs by: Planet Patrol, Warp 9, Man Parrish, George Clinton (Computer Games), Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Tyrone Brunson, The Jonzun Crew and Whodini. Bambaataa and groups like Planet Patrol, Jonzun Crew, Mantronix, Newcleus, Warp 9 and Juan Atkins' Detroit-based group Cybotron went on to influence the genres of Detroit techno, ghettotech, breakbeat, drum and bass and electroclash.
Warp 9, was a science-fiction-themed electro-funk and hip hop trio, best known for its influential singles "Nunk," "Light Years Away," and "Beat Wave," which ranked among the most iconic groups of the electro hip hop era.

Electronic dance music

EDMdanceelectronic dance
It is important to note, that although the electro of the 1980s and contemporary electro (electronic dance music) both grew out of the dissolution of disco, they are now different genres.
In the United States at that time, acceptance of dance culture was not universal; although both electro and Chicago house music were influential both in Europe and the United States, mainstream media outlets and the record industry remained openly hostile to it.

Lotti Golden

Electro hip hop group Warp 9's 1983 single, Light Years Away, produced and written by Lotti Golden and Richard Scher, exemplifies the Sci-Fi, afrofuturist aspect of electro, reflected in both the lyrics and instrumentation.
Credited for her innovative work in early electro and Hip hop music, Golden is featured in the Rap Attack 3: African Rap To Global Hip Hop by David Toop, and Signed, Sealed, and Delivered: True Life Stories of Women of Pop for her pioneering work as a female record producer.

Greg Wilson (DJ)

Greg Wilson
About electro origins, Greg Wilson claims:
Greg Wilson (born 1960) is an English DJ and producer associated with both the early 80s electro scene in Manchester and the current disco / re-edit movement.

Zapp (band)

ZappLarry TroutmanZapp & Roger
Following the decline of disco music in the late 1970s, various funk artists such as Zapp & Roger began experimenting with talk boxes and the use of heavier, more distinctive beats.
Particularly influential in the electro subgenre of funk, Zapp were known for their trademark use of the talk-box effect.

Breakbeat

breaksbreakbeatsprogressive breaks
Classic (1980s) electro drum patterns tend to be electronic emulations of breakbeats (occasionally a four to the floor pattern is used as well), with a syncopated kick drum, and usually a snare or clap accenting the backbeat. Bambaataa and groups like Planet Patrol, Jonzun Crew, Mantronix, Newcleus, Warp 9 and Juan Atkins' Detroit-based group Cybotron went on to influence the genres of Detroit techno, ghettotech, breakbeat, drum and bass and electroclash.
In the late-1980s, breakbeat became an essential feature of many genres of breaks music which became popular within the global dance music scene, including big beat, nu skool breaks, acid breaks, electro-funk, and Miami bass.

Kraftwerk

Henning SchmitzEberhard KranemannStefan Pfaffe
Early hip hop and rap combined with German and Japanese electropop influences such as Kraftwerk and Yellow Magic Orchestra (YMO) inspired the birth of electro.
Kraftwerk would also go on to influence other forms of music such as hip hop, house, and drum and bass, and they are also regarded as pioneers of the electro genre.

Ryuichi Sakamoto

SakamotoSakamoto RyuichiRyûichi Sakamoto
That same year, YMO member Ryuichi Sakamoto released "", which is regarded as an early example of electro music, and is credited for having anticipated the beats and sounds of electro.
It included the track "Riot in Lagos", which was significant in the development of electro and hip hop music.

Mantronix

D.J. DChamonixDJ Dee
The song's influence can be seen in the work of later pioneering electro artists such as Afrika Bambaataa and Mantronix.
Mantronix was an influential 1980s hip hop and electro funk music group from New York City.

You're the One for Me (D. Train song)

You're the One for Me
Boogie played a role during the formative years of electro, notably "Feels Good" by Electra (Emergency – EMDS-6527), the post-disco production "You're the One for Me" by D. Train (Prelude – PRL D 621), and the Eric Matthew/Darryl Payne productions "Thanks to You" by Sinnamon (Becket – BKD 508), and "On A Journey (I Sing The Funk Electric)" by Electrik Funk (Prelude – PRL D 541).
Their style of soul vocals combined with multi-layered electronics, drum machines, and prominent synth bass was typical of the New York electronic R&B sound of the early 1980s (retroactively known to DJs and record collectors as "boogie") and was also a progenitor of the old school hip-hop subgenre, electro, a year before the seminal electro track "Planet Rock" was released.

Planet Patrol

Electro hip hop releases in 1982 include songs by: Planet Patrol, Warp 9, Man Parrish, George Clinton (Computer Games), Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Tyrone Brunson, The Jonzun Crew and Whodini. Bambaataa and groups like Planet Patrol, Jonzun Crew, Mantronix, Newcleus, Warp 9 and Juan Atkins' Detroit-based group Cybotron went on to influence the genres of Detroit techno, ghettotech, breakbeat, drum and bass and electroclash.
Planet Patrol is an American electro group originating in the 1980s.

Electronic music

electronicelectronic musicianelectro
Electro (or electro-funk) is a genre of electronic music and early hip hop directly influenced by the use of the Roland TR-808 drum machines, and funk.

Disco

disco musicdisco eraanti-disco backlash
Following the decline of disco music in the late 1970s, various funk artists such as Zapp & Roger began experimenting with talk boxes and the use of heavier, more distinctive beats. This is the main distinction between electro and previously prominent genres such as disco, in which the electronic sound was only part of the instrumentation.
The Planet Rock sound also spawned a hip hop electronic dance trend, electro music, which included songs such as Planet Patrol's "Play at Your Own Risk" (1982), C Bank's "One More Shot" (1982), Cerrone's "Club Underworld" (1984), Shannon's "Let the Music Play" (1983), Freeez's "I.O.U."

Tyrone Brunson (musician)

Tyrone Brunson
Electro hip hop releases in 1982 include songs by: Planet Patrol, Warp 9, Man Parrish, George Clinton (Computer Games), Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five, Tyrone Brunson, The Jonzun Crew and Whodini.
One of his most successful singles was an electro-funk

Arthur Baker (musician)

Arthur BakerCriminal Element OrchestraArthur Baker & the Backbeat Disciples
In 1982, producer Arthur Baker with Afrika Bambaataa released the seminal "Planet Rock", which was built using samples from Kraftwerk's Trans-Europe Express (1977) and drum beats supplied by the TR-808.

Newcleus

Chilly BJam On ItYvette Cook
Bambaataa and groups like Planet Patrol, Jonzun Crew, Mantronix, Newcleus, Warp 9 and Juan Atkins' Detroit-based group Cybotron went on to influence the genres of Detroit techno, ghettotech, breakbeat, drum and bass and electroclash.
Newcleus was an American electro and old school hip hop group that gained popularity in the early 1980s.

Jerry Calliste Jr.

HashimAl-Naafiysh (The Soul)Hashim Music
In 1983, Hashim created an electro funk sound which influenced Herbie Hancock, resulting in his hit single "Rockit".
One year later he went on to write and produce Al-Naafiysh (The Soul) "one of the greatest Electro tracks ever" that during the early 1980s "made it to #43 in the Billboards Dance Disco Charts" and to this day "parts of Al-Naafiysh (The Soul) have been sampled over and over again."