Electromagnet

electromagnetselectro-magnetelectromagneticMultiple coil magnetbipolar magnetscoilscontaminating fieldelectrical magnetElectro Magnetelectromagnetic coil
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current.wikipedia
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Magnetic core

core lossiron coresoft iron
The wire turns are often wound around a magnetic core made from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material such as iron; the magnetic core concentrates the magnetic flux and makes a more powerful magnet.
A magnetic core is a piece of magnetic material with a high magnetic permeability used to confine and guide magnetic fields in electrical, electromechanical and magnetic devices such as electromagnets, transformers, electric motors, generators, inductors, magnetic recording heads, and magnetic assemblies.

Electromagnetic coil

coilwindingcoils
Electromagnets usually consist of wire wound into a coil.
Electromagnetic coils are used in electrical engineering, in applications where electric currents interact with magnetic fields, in devices such as electric motors, generators, inductors, electromagnets, transformers, and sensor coils.

Relay

relayslatching relayelectric relay
Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, electromechanical solenoids, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment.
The traditional form of a relay uses an electromagnet to close or open the contacts, but other operating principles have been invented, such as in solid-state relays which use semiconductor properties for control without relying on moving parts.

Magnet

permanent magnetmagnetspermanent magnets
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current.
An electromagnet is made from a coil of wire that acts as a magnet when an electric current passes through it but stops being a magnet when the current stops.

Solenoid

solenoidselectromechanical solenoidmagnetizing current loop
Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, electromechanical solenoids, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment.
A solenoid is an electromagnet, the purpose of which is to generate a controlled magnetic field.

Joseph Henry

Henry, JosephHenryJoseph Henry Papers Project
Beginning in 1830, US scientist Joseph Henry systematically improved and popularized the electromagnet.
Henry developed the electromagnet into a practical device.

William Sturgeon

SturgeonSturgeon, William
British scientist William Sturgeon invented the electromagnet in 1824.
William Sturgeon (22 May 1783 – 4 December 1850) was an English physicist and inventor who made the first electromagnets, and invented the first practical English electric motor.

Loudspeaker

loudspeakersspeakerspeakers
Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, electromechanical solenoids, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment.
These first loudspeakers used electromagnets, because large, powerful permanent magnets were generally not available at a reasonable price.

Electric bell

bell
An electric bell is a mechanical bell that functions by means of an electromagnet.

Magnetic separation

magnetic separatormagnetically separatedWetherill's Magnetic Separator
Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, electromechanical solenoids, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment.
After the Second World War, systems that were the most common were electromagnets.

Pierre Weiss

Pierre-Ernest WeissP. WeissWeiss, Pierre
The magnetic domain theory of how ferromagnetic cores work was first proposed in 1906 by French physicist Pierre-Ernest Weiss, and the detailed modern quantum mechanical theory of ferromagnetism was worked out in the 1920s by Werner Heisenberg, Lev Landau, Felix Bloch and others.
Pierre Weiss made several experimental discoveries that led to the development of the strongest electromagnets of the beginning of the 20th century.

Electromagnetic lock

magnetic lock
An electromagnetic lock, magnetic lock, or maglock is a locking device that consists of an electromagnet and an armature plate.

Telegraph sounder

soundersSounder
The first major use for electromagnets was in telegraph sounders.
It was invented by Alfred Vail after 1850 to replace the previous receiving device, the cumbersome Morse register and was the first practical application of the electromagnet.

Induction heating

InductionInductive heatingby magnetic induction
An induction heater consists of an electromagnet and an electronic oscillator that passes a high-frequency alternating current (AC) through the electromagnet.

Electric motor

motorelectric motorsmotors
Electromagnets are widely used as components of other electrical devices, such as motors, generators, electromechanical solenoids, relays, loudspeakers, hard disks, MRI machines, scientific instruments, and magnetic separation equipment.
Current from the brushes flows through the commutator and one winding of the armature, making it a temporary magnet (an electromagnet).

Magnetic circuit

Hopkinson's lawMagnetic Circuitsair gap
In many practical applications of electromagnets, such as motors, generators, transformers, lifting magnets, and loudspeakers, the iron core is in the form of a loop or magnetic circuit, possibly broken by a few narrow air gaps.
The flux is usually generated by permanent magnets or electromagnets and confined to the path by magnetic cores consisting of ferromagnetic materials like iron, although there may be air gaps or other materials in the path.

Ferromagnetism

ferromagneticferromagnetferromagnets
The wire turns are often wound around a magnetic core made from a ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic material such as iron; the magnetic core concentrates the magnetic flux and makes a more powerful magnet.
Ferromagnetism is very important in industry and modern technology, and is the basis for many electrical and electromechanical devices such as electromagnets, electric motors, generators, transformers, and magnetic storage such as tape recorders, and hard disks, and nondestructive testing of ferrous materials.

Maglev

maglev trainmagnetic levitationmagnetic levitation train
In electromagnetic suspension (EMS) systems, the train levitates above a steel rail while electromagnets, attached to the train, are oriented toward the rail from below.

Magnetic storage

magnetic recordingmagnetic mediamagnetic disk
Early HDDs used an electromagnet both to magnetise the region and to then read its magnetic field by using electromagnetic induction.

Right-hand rule

right hand ruleright-handedright hand grip rule
The direction of the magnetic field through a coil of wire can be found from a form of the right-hand rule.

Particle accelerator

particle acceleratorsacceleratoraccelerators
They are used in particle accelerators and MRI machines.
The particle track is typically bent into a circle using electromagnets.

Remanence

remanentremanent magnetizationremanent magnetism
This phenomenon is called hysteresis and the remaining magnetic field is called remanent magnetism.
In transformers, electric motors and generators a large residual magnetization is not desirable (see also electrical steel) as it is an unwanted contamination, for example a magnetization remaining in an electromagnet after the current in the coil is turned off.

Magnetic field

magnetic fieldsmagneticmagnetic flux density
An electromagnet is a type of magnet in which the magnetic field is produced by an electric current.
Magnetic fields surround and are created by magnetized material and by moving electric charges (electric currents) such as those used in electromagnets.

Headphones

headphoneearphoneearphones
When precisely centered in the magnetic field there is no net force on the armature, hence the term 'balanced.' As illustrated in the second diagram, when there is electric current through the coil, it magnetizes the armature one way or the other, causing it to rotate slightly one way or the other about the pivot thus moving the diaphragm to make sound.

Bitter electromagnet

BitterBitter plate
Therefore, the most powerful man-made magnetic fields have been generated by air-core nonsuperconducting electromagnets of a design invented by Francis Bitter in 1933, called Bitter electromagnets.
A Bitter electromagnet or Bitter solenoid is a type of electromagnet invented in 1933 by American physicist Francis Bitter used in scientific research to create extremely strong magnetic fields.