Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen ElizabethElizabethPrincess ElizabethElizabethanQueenthe QueenQueen Elizabeth I of EnglandLady Elizabeth
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603.wikipedia
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William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley

William CecilLord BurghleySir William Cecil
She depended heavily on a group of trusted advisers, led by William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley.
William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, (13 September 15204 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–1553 and 1558–1572) and Lord High Treasurer from 1572.

List of English monarchs

MonarchKing of EnglandKing
Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603) was Queen of England and Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death on 24 March 1603.
After the death of Queen Elizabeth I without issue, in 1603, King James VI of Scotland also became James I of England, joining the crowns of England and Scotland in personal union.

Elizabethan Religious Settlement

Religious SettlementElizabethan SettlementElizabethan
This Elizabethan Religious Settlement was to evolve into the Church of England.
The Elizabethan Religious Settlement, which was made during the reign of Elizabeth I, was a response to the religious divisions in England during the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI, Lady Jane Grey, and Mary I.

Lady Jane Grey

JaneQueen JaneJane Grey
Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary.
The will named his half-sisters Mary and Elizabeth illegitimate and removed them from the succession, subverting their claims under the Third Succession Act.

Anne Boleyn

Queen Anne BoleynAnneQueen Anne
Elizabeth was the daughter of Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, his second wife, who was executed two-and-a-half years after Elizabeth's birth.
On 7 September, she gave birth to the future Queen Elizabeth I.

Elizabethan era

ElizabethanElizabethan EnglandElizabethan times
Elizabeth's reign became known as the Elizabethan era.
The Elizabethan era is the epoch in the Tudor period of the history of England during the reign of Queen Elizabeth I (1558–1603).

Spanish Armada

ArmadaBattle of GravelinesSpanish invasion
England's defeat of the Spanish Armada in 1588 associated Elizabeth with one of the greatest military victories in English history.
The strategic aim was to overthrow Queen Elizabeth I and her establishment of Protestantism in England, with the expectation that this would put a stop to English interference in the Spanish Netherlands and to the harm caused to Spanish interests by English and Dutch privateering.

Mary, Queen of Scots

Mary StuartQueen MaryMary
She had earlier been responsible for the imprisonment and execution of James's mother, Mary, Queen of Scots.
After an unsuccessful attempt to regain the throne, she fled southwards seeking the protection of her first cousin once removed, Queen Elizabeth I of England.

English Renaissance theatre

English Renaissance dramaElizabethanJacobean
The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, and for the seafaring prowess of English adventurers such as Francis Drake.
The phrase Elizabethan theatre is sometimes used, improperly, to mean English Renaissance theatre, although in a strict sense "Elizabethan" only refers to the period of Queen Elizabeth's reign (1558–1603).

Regnans in Excelsis

declared her illegitimateexcommunicatedexcommunication of Elizabeth I
After the pope declared her illegitimate in 1570 and released her subjects from obedience to her, several conspiracies threatened her life, all of which were defeated with the help of her ministers' secret service.
Regnans in Excelsis ("reigning on high") was a papal bull issued on 25 February 1570 by Pope Pius V declaring "Elizabeth, the pretended Queen of England and the servant of crime", to be a heretic and releasing all her subjects from any allegiance to her, even when they had "sworn oaths to her", and excommunicating any that obeyed her orders.

Francis Drake

Sir Francis DrakeDrakeDrake, Francis
The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, and for the seafaring prowess of English adventurers such as Francis Drake.
Elizabeth I awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581 which he received on the Golden Hind in Deptford.

Virginity

virginmaidenvirgins
As she grew older, Elizabeth became celebrated for her virginity.
In this case, more-mature women can be virgins (The Virgin Queen), men can be virgins, and potential initiates into many fields can be colloquially termed virgins; for example, a skydiving "virgin".

Elizabeth Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire

Elizabeth HowardLady Elizabeth HowardElizabeth
Elizabeth was born at Greenwich Palace and was named after her grandmothers, Elizabeth of York and Elizabeth Howard.
Elizabeth Boleyn, Countess of Wiltshire (née Lady Elizabeth Howard; c. 1480 – 3 April 1538) was an English noblewoman, noted for being the mother of Anne Boleyn and as such the maternal grandmother of Elizabeth I of England.

George Boleyn, 2nd Viscount Rochford

George BoleynGeorgeLord Rochford
A canopy was carried at the ceremony over the three-day old child by her uncle Viscount Rochford, Lord Hussey, Lord Thomas Howard, and Lord Howard of Effingham.
This made him the brother-in-law of King Henry VIII and the maternal uncle of Queen Elizabeth I of England.

Christopher Marlowe

MarloweC. MarloweChristopher "Kit" Marlowe
The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, and for the seafaring prowess of English adventurers such as Francis Drake.
However, his degree was awarded on schedule when the Privy Council intervened on his behalf, commending him for his "faithful dealing" and "good service" to the Queen.

Kat Ashley

Katherine Ashley née ChampernowneCatherine AshleyCatherine Astley
Catherine Champernowne, better known by her later, married name of Catherine "Kat" Ashley, was appointed as Elizabeth's governess in 1537, and she remained Elizabeth's friend until her death in 1565.
Katherine Ashley (circa 1502 – 18 July 1565) (or Astley), née Katherine Champernowne, was governess to Queen Elizabeth I of England and became her close friend in later life.

House of Tudor

TudorTudorsTudor dynasty
Sometimes called The Virgin Queen, Gloriana or Good Queen Bess, Elizabeth was the last of the five monarchs of the House of Tudor.
In order to allow Henry to divorce his wife and marry Anne Boleyn, the English parliament enacted laws breaking ties with Rome, and declaring the king Supreme Head of the Church of England (from Elizabeth I the monarch is known as the Supreme Governor of the Church of England), thus severing the ecclesiastical structure of England from the Catholic Church and the Pope.

William Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Effingham

William HowardLord Howard of EffinghamLord William Howard
A canopy was carried at the ceremony over the three-day old child by her uncle Viscount Rochford, Lord Hussey, Lord Thomas Howard, and Lord Howard of Effingham.
He served four monarchs, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I, in various official capacities, most notably on diplomatic missions and as Lord Admiral and Lord Chamberlain of the Household.

Roger Ascham

AschamAscham, Roger
After Grindal died in 1548, Elizabeth received her education under Roger Ascham, a sympathetic teacher who believed that learning should be engaging.
He acted as Princess Elizabeth's tutor in Greek and Latin between 1548 and 1550, and served in the administrations of Edward VI, Mary I, and Elizabeth I.

Margaret Bryan

Margaret BourchierLady BryanLady Margaret Bryan
Elizabeth's first governess, Margaret Bryan, wrote that she was "as toward a child and as gentle of conditions as ever I knew any in my life".
Margaret Bryan, Baroness Bryan (c. 1468 – c. 1551/52) was Lady Governess to Henry VIII's children: Princess Mary, Princess Elizabeth, Henry FitzRoy and Prince Edward.

Edward VI of England

Edward VIKing Edward VIEdward
Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary.
Edward named his first cousin once removed, Lady Jane Grey, as his heir, excluding his half-sisters, Mary and Elizabeth.

Catherine Parr

Katherine ParrCatherineQueen Catherine Parr
Catherine Parr, Henry's widow, soon married Thomas Seymour, 1st Baron Seymour of Sudeley, Edward VI's uncle and the brother of the Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset.
Catherine enjoyed a close relationship with Henry's three children and was personally involved in the education of Elizabeth I and Edward VI.

Margaret Wotton, Marchioness of Dorset

Margaret WottonMargaretDowager Marchioness of Dorset
She was baptised on 10 September 1533; Archbishop Thomas Cranmer, the Marquess of Exeter, the Duchess of Norfolk and the Dowager Marchioness of Dorset stood as her godparents.
On 10 September 1533, she stood as one of the godmothers of Princess Elizabeth, who would later rule as Queen Elizabeth I of England.

William Shakespeare

ShakespeareShakespeareanShakespearian
The period is famous for the flourishing of English drama, led by playwrights such as William Shakespeare and Christopher Marlowe, and for the seafaring prowess of English adventurers such as Francis Drake.
After the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603, the company was awarded a royal patent by the new King James I, and changed its name to the King's Men.

William Killigrew (Chamberlain of the Exchequer)

William KilligrewSir William Killigrew
Historian Mark Stoyle suggests that she was probably taught Cornish by William Killigrew, Groom of the Privy Chamber and later Chamberlain of the Exchequer.
Sir William Killigrew (died 1622) of Hanworth, Middlesex, was a courtier to Queen Elizabeth I and to her successor King James I, whom he served as Groom of the Privy Chamber.