Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital

Ellis Island HospitalEllis Island hospital complex
The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital (also known as USPHS Hospital #43) was a United States Public Health Service hospital on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, which operated from 1902 to 1951.wikipedia
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Ellis Island

Fort GibsonEllisEllis Island Immigration Museum
The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital (also known as USPHS Hospital #43) was a United States Public Health Service hospital on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, which operated from 1902 to 1951. Prior to being an Immigration Station, Ellis Island was the site of Fort Gibson, an 18th-century fort which was part of the New York Harbor defenses along with the Battery, Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island, and Fort Jay on Governors Island.
The south side of the island, including the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital, is abandoned but accessible to the public through guided tours.

Save Ellis Island

While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island, including the hospital, is managed by the non-profit Save Ellis Island Foundation and has been off-limits to the general public since its closing in 1954.
Save Ellis Island, founded in 1999, is a 501(c)(3) organization and partner of the National Park Service for the rehabilitation of the 29 mostly unrestored buildings comprising the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital on the south side of Ellis Island in New York Harbor.

James Knox Taylor

James K. Taylor
By September, the Treasury's Supervising Architect, James Knox Taylor, opened an architecture competition to rebuild the immigration station The competition was the second to be conducted under the Tarsney Act of 1893, which had permitted private architects to design federal buildings, rather than government architects in the Supervising Architect's office.

Immigration Act of 1891

The Immigration Act of 1891 formalized previous immigration laws and gave full authority to the US government and allowed the US Government to deport immigrants which meant it had the ability to enforce the laws.
The medical examination to determine medical excludability (as described in Section 1 of the Act) and detention of migrants with medical conditions were carried out at the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital located in the south side of the island.

New York Landmarks Conservancy

Common Bond (magazine)The New York Landmarks Conservancy
In 1996, the World Monuments Fund listed the hospital as one of the world's 100 Most Endangered Properties, a warning echoed by the National Trust for Historic Preservation, which put the buildings on the list of “most endangered historical places in the United States.” A study conducted by the New York Landmarks Conservancy estimated that with about $3 million of federal funding, the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital could be stabilized for the next 15 years.

Statue of Liberty National Monument

Statue of Liberty National Monument, Ellis Island and Liberty IslandEllis Island and Liberty IslandEllis Island-Liberty Island ferry
The hospital is part of the Statue of Liberty National Monument.
Established in 1924, it includes the Statue of Liberty (Liberty Enlightening the World) by sculptor Frédéric Auguste Bartholdi, situated on Liberty Island, as well as the former immigration station at Ellis Island which includes the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital.

Forgotten Ellis Island

Forgotten Ellis Island (film)
Forgotten Ellis Island, a documentary by Lorie Conway, explores the abandoned buildings on the island and covers the history of the hospital.
It portrays the story of the Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital.

Ellis (film)

EllisEllis'' (film)
The shooting took place in the abandoned Ellis Island Hospital complex.

United States Public Health Service

U.S. Public Health ServicePublic Health ServiceUS Public Health Service
The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital (also known as USPHS Hospital #43) was a United States Public Health Service hospital on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, which operated from 1902 to 1951.

New York Harbor

New York HarbourNew YorkNew York waterfront
The Ellis Island Immigrant Hospital (also known as USPHS Hospital #43) was a United States Public Health Service hospital on Ellis Island in New York Harbor, which operated from 1902 to 1951.

National Park Service

U.S. National Park ServiceNational Park SystemUnited States National Park Service
While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island, including the hospital, is managed by the non-profit Save Ellis Island Foundation and has been off-limits to the general public since its closing in 1954.

National Parks of New York Harbor

While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island, including the hospital, is managed by the non-profit Save Ellis Island Foundation and has been off-limits to the general public since its closing in 1954.

Marine Hospital Service

Marine HospitalUnited States Marine HospitalUnited States Marine Hospital Service
The Immigrant Hospital was run by the Marine Hospital Service, which was re-organized and expanded in 1902 and became the Public Health and Marine Hospital Service.

The Battery (Manhattan)

Battery Parkthe BatteryBattery
Prior to being an Immigration Station, Ellis Island was the site of Fort Gibson, an 18th-century fort which was part of the New York Harbor defenses along with the Battery, Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island, and Fort Jay on Governors Island.

Liberty Island

Bedloe's IslandFort WoodAmerican Museum of Immigration
Prior to being an Immigration Station, Ellis Island was the site of Fort Gibson, an 18th-century fort which was part of the New York Harbor defenses along with the Battery, Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island, and Fort Jay on Governors Island.

Fort Jay

Fort ColumbusFort Jay, New YorkNew York Arsenal
Prior to being an Immigration Station, Ellis Island was the site of Fort Gibson, an 18th-century fort which was part of the New York Harbor defenses along with the Battery, Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island, and Fort Jay on Governors Island.

Governors Island

Governor's IslandGovernors Island, New YorkGovernor’s Island
Prior to being an Immigration Station, Ellis Island was the site of Fort Gibson, an 18th-century fort which was part of the New York Harbor defenses along with the Battery, Fort Wood on Bedloe's Island, and Fort Jay on Governors Island.

Castle Clinton

Castle GardenCastle Clinton National MonumentCastle Garden Immigration Depot
New York State, which operated Castle Clinton in the Battery when Immigration was administered by the States, had built a very effective facility.

Randalls and Wards Islands

Randall's IslandRandalls IslandWards Island
Immigrants who entered through Castle Garden were sent to the Ward's Island Emigrant Hospital, which opened in 1864, and was constructed in the Pavilion style, which the New York Times reported was the exemplar of a modern hospital.

The New York Times

New York TimesNY TimesNYT
Immigrants who entered through Castle Garden were sent to the Ward's Island Emigrant Hospital, which opened in 1864, and was constructed in the Pavilion style, which the New York Times reported was the exemplar of a modern hospital.

Immigration Act of 1882

1882 Immigration Act1882 Chinese Exclusion Act
In 1882 the United States Government passed the Immigration Act of 1882 It excluded immigrants who were Likely to Become a Public Charge (LPC) meaning they were to be excluded if they could not demonstrate their ability to work and not require any assistance from the Government or a charity.

Bellevue Hospital

Bellevue Hospital CenterBellevueBellevue Medical College
The Buffalo Evening News reported that all 40 patients were safely evacuated and taken to Bellevue Hospital.

Office of the Supervising Architect for the U.S. Treasury

Office of the Supervising ArchitectSupervising ArchitectSupervising Architect of the Treasury
By September, the Treasury's Supervising Architect, James Knox Taylor, opened an architecture competition to rebuild the immigration station The competition was the second to be conducted under the Tarsney Act of 1893, which had permitted private architects to design federal buildings, rather than government architects in the Supervising Architect's office.

John Charles Tarsney

Tarsney ActJohn C. Tarsney
By September, the Treasury's Supervising Architect, James Knox Taylor, opened an architecture competition to rebuild the immigration station The competition was the second to be conducted under the Tarsney Act of 1893, which had permitted private architects to design federal buildings, rather than government architects in the Supervising Architect's office.

Edward Lippincott Tilton

Edward L. TiltonEdward TiltonTilton & Githens
By December, it was announced that Edward Lippincott Tilton and William A. Boring had won the competition.