A report on Leiden and Elsevier

The original seal of the Elsevier family is used by Elsevier company as its logo.
Topographic map of Leiden
Windmill museum De Valk
Relief of Leiden (1574), painting by Otto van Veen. Inundated meadows allow the Dutch fleet access to the Spanish infantry positions.
17th-century houses along the Herengracht
Town hall and bridge (de Koornbrug)
The 1852 Sijthoff printing office, Leiden
Leiden's west gate, the Morspoort
Leiden's east gate, the Zijlpoort
The Singel at night, showing the chimney of the Light Factory
Leiden grew twelve-fold in size between 1896 and 1981, annexing land from neighboring municipalities.
Canal near Leiden - May 1978
Hooglandse Kerk, Leiden
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The 1860 Leiden Observatory, after restoration (2013)
De Waag (1900)
Leiden, central railway station
William II, Count of Holland in the Lakenhal
Rembrandt van Rijn, ca.1655
Willem van de Velde II, ca.1660)
Leoni Jansen, 2013
Herman Boerhaave
Johannes Diderik van der Waals
Alfons Groenendijk, 2017
Kjeld Nuis, 2018
Buurtpoes Bledder
The poem on Leiden's Stadhuis
Shakespeare
Langston Hughes
e.e. cummings
Waring Cuney

The Elzevir family operated as booksellers and publishers in the Netherlands; the founder, Lodewijk Elzevir (1542–1617), lived in Leiden and established that business in 1580.

- Elsevier

One of Christoffel's pupils was Lodewijk Elzevir (1547–1617), who established the largest bookshop and printing works in Leiden, a business continued by his descendants through 1712 and the name subsequently adopted (in a variant spelling) by contemporary publisher Elsevier.

- Leiden

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Overall

Book about fencing published in Leiden by Isack Elsevier in 1619

House of Elzevir

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Name of a celebrated family of Dutch booksellers, publishers, and printers of the 17th and early 18th centuries.

Name of a celebrated family of Dutch booksellers, publishers, and printers of the 17th and early 18th centuries.

Book about fencing published in Leiden by Isack Elsevier in 1619
The famous Elsevier tree printer's mark, in a 1653 book. The modern Elsevier logo is based on this design.
Elsevir printer mark depicted in the Library of Congress

The family ceased printing in 1712, but a contemporary publisher, Elsevier (founded in 1880), took over, for marketing purposes, the name and logo of this early modern business, but without having any real historical connections to it.

In 1580, he made a final move to Leiden, where he seems to have worked first as a bookbinder, and later as a bookseller and publisher.

Title page from Prof. Nicolaes Tulp's book called Observacionum Medicarum, published by Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1641

Lodewijk Elzevir

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Lodewijk Elzevir (c.

Lodewijk Elzevir (c.

Title page from Prof. Nicolaes Tulp's book called Observacionum Medicarum, published by Ludovicum Elzevirium, 1641

1540, Leuven – 4 February 1617, Leiden), originally Lodewijk or Louis Elsevier or Elzevier, was a printer, born in the city of Leuven (today in Belgium, then part of the Habsburg Netherlands or Spanish Netherlands).

Although the House of Elzevir ceased publishing in 1712, the modern Dutch Elsevier company was founded in 1880 and took its name from the historic Dutch publishing house.