Embolus

embolibreaking off, and then traveling in the bloodstreamembolic eventembolise
An embolus (plural emboli; from the Greek ἔμβολος "wedge", "plug") is an unattached mass that travels through the bloodstream and is capable of clogging arterial capillary beds (create an arterial occlusion) at a site distant from its point of origin.wikipedia
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Embolism

embolicerebral embolismembolus
However, if a thrombus breaks loose from its genesis site it becomes a thrombo-embolus and if not broken down during transit, may cause embolism(s).
An embolism is the lodging of an embolus, a blockage-causing piece of material, inside a blood vessel.

Circulatory system

cardiovascularcirculationcardiovascular system
An embolus (plural emboli; from the Greek ἔμβολος "wedge", "plug") is an unattached mass that travels through the bloodstream and is capable of clogging arterial capillary beds (create an arterial occlusion) at a site distant from its point of origin.
These clots may embolise, meaning travel to another location in the body.

Venous thrombosis

venous thromboembolismthromboembolismthromboembolic disease
In thromboembolism, the thrombus (blood clot) from a blood vessel is completely or partially detached from the site of thrombosis (clot).
A piece of thrombus that is transported in this way is an embolus: the process of forming a thrombus that becomes embolic is called a thromboembolism.

Ischemia

ischemicischaemiaischaemic
Vessel obstruction will then lead to different pathological issues such as blood stasis and ischemia.

Cholesterol embolism

cholesterol embolicholesterolCholesterol embolus
Cholesterol embolism occurs when cholesterol is released, usually from an atherosclerotic plaque, and travels as an embolus in the bloodstream to lodge (as an embolism) causing an obstruction in blood vessels further away.

Vascular occlusion

occlusionoccludedblockage
An embolus (plural emboli; from the Greek ἔμβολος "wedge", "plug") is an unattached mass that travels through the bloodstream and is capable of clogging arterial capillary beds (create an arterial occlusion) at a site distant from its point of origin.

Cholesterol

total cholesteroldietary cholesterolserum cholesterol
There are a number of different types of emboli, including blood clots, cholesterol plaque or crystals, fat globules, gas bubbles, and foreign bodies.

Foreign body

foreign bodiesforeign objectsextraction of foreign bodies
There are a number of different types of emboli, including blood clots, cholesterol plaque or crystals, fat globules, gas bubbles, and foreign bodies.

Inflammation

inflammatoryinflammatory responseinflamed
By contrast, there are non-traveling blockages that develop locally from vascular trauma or epithelial pathology and vascular inflammation — such as atheromata and thrombi.

Atheroma

atherosclerotic plaqueplaqueatheromatous plaque
By contrast, there are non-traveling blockages that develop locally from vascular trauma or epithelial pathology and vascular inflammation — such as atheromata and thrombi.

Thrombus

blood clotblood clotsclot
There are a number of different types of emboli, including blood clots, cholesterol plaque or crystals, fat globules, gas bubbles, and foreign bodies. By contrast, there are non-traveling blockages that develop locally from vascular trauma or epithelial pathology and vascular inflammation — such as atheromata and thrombi.

Rudolf Virchow

VirchowRudolph VirchowRudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow
The term was coined in 1848 by Rudolf Virchow.

Fat embolism syndrome

fat embolismfatfat emboli
Fat embolism usually occurs when endogenous (from sources within the organism) fat tissue escapes into the blood circulation.

Fracture

fracturesbrittle fracturecrack
The usual cause of fat embolism is therefore the fracture of tubular bones (such as the femur), which will lead to the leakage of fat tissue within the bone marrow into ruptured vessels.

Femur

femorathigh bonefemoral
The usual cause of fat embolism is therefore the fracture of tubular bones (such as the femur), which will lead to the leakage of fat tissue within the bone marrow into ruptured vessels.

Emulsion

emulsifieremulsifiersemulsions
There are also exogenous (from sources of external origin) causes such as intravenous injection of emulsions.

Pulmonary alveolus

alveolialveolarpulmonary alveoli
This can be the rupture of alveoli, and inhaled air can be leaked into the blood vessels.

Subclavian vein

subclavian veinssubclavianRight subclavian vein
Other more-common causes include the puncture of the subclavian vein by accident or during operation where there is negative pressure.

Iatrogenesis

iatrogeniciatrogenicallyiatrogenic disease
Air embolism can also happen during intravenous therapy, when air is leaked into the system (however this iatrogenic error in modern medicine is extremely rare).

Air embolism

arterial gas embolismgas embolismgas embolisms
An air embolism, on the other hand, is usually always caused by exogenic factors.

Decompression sickness

the bendscaisson diseasebends
This is also known as decompression sickness or the bends.

Henry's law

Henry constantHenry’s LawBunsen solubility coefficient
This phenomenon is explained by Henry's Law in physical chemistry.

Pus

purulentsuppurationpyogenic
Septic embolism happens when a purulent tissue (pus-containing tissue) is dislodged from its original focus.

Cancer

cancersmalignanciescancerous
Tissue embolism is a near-equivalent to cancer metastasis, which happens when cancer tissue infiltrates blood vessels, and small fragments of them are released into the blood stream.

Metastasis

metastaticmetastasesmetastasized
Tissue embolism is a near-equivalent to cancer metastasis, which happens when cancer tissue infiltrates blood vessels, and small fragments of them are released into the blood stream.