Emigration

emigratedemigrateemigrantemigrantsemigratingexodusmigrationemigratesemigration rateimmigrants
Emigration is the act of leaving a resident country or place of residence with the intent to settle elsewhere.wikipedia
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Immigration

immigrantimmigrantsimmigrated
Conversely, immigration describes the movement of persons into one country from another.
Sociology designates immigration usually as migration (as well as emigration accordingly outward migration).

Overseas Chinese

Chineseethnic ChineseChinese diaspora
Likewise, millions left South China in the Chinese diaspora during the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Hence, emigrants from Suriname and Indonesia were shorter than some Chinese prisoners who used to live in the U.S. and Australia.

Eastern Bloc emigration and defection

defectorEastern Bloc defectorsEastern Bloc emigration restrictions
Eastern Bloc emigration and defection
After World War II, emigration restrictions were imposed by countries in the Eastern Bloc, which consisted of the Soviet Union and its satellite states in Central and Eastern Europe.

Yerida

Israeli diasporaexpatriate Israelislive across the world
Yerida (Jewish emigration from Israel)
Yerida ( yerida, "descent") is a Hebrew term referring to emigration by Israeli Jews from the State of Israel (or in religious texts, Land of Israel).

Human migration

migrationmigratedmigrants
Both are acts of migration across national or other geographical boundaries.
The top countries of origin are:

Refugee

refugeesasylumrefugee status
Fleeing from oppressive conditions, being a refugee and seeking asylum to get refugee status in a foreign country, may lead to permanent emigration.

Asylum seeker

asylum seekersasylumasylum-seeker
Fleeing from oppressive conditions, being a refugee and seeking asylum to get refugee status in a foreign country, may lead to permanent emigration.

Forced displacement

displaced persondisplaced personsforced migration
Forced displacement refers to groups that are forced to abandon their native country, such as by enforced population transfer or the threat of ethnic cleansing.

Population transfer

resettlementpopulation exchangeexpulsion
Forced displacement refers to groups that are forced to abandon their native country, such as by enforced population transfer or the threat of ethnic cleansing.

Ethnic cleansing

ethnically cleansedethnically cleansecleansing
Forced displacement refers to groups that are forced to abandon their native country, such as by enforced population transfer or the threat of ethnic cleansing.

Europe

EuropeanEUEuropean continent
For instance, millions of individuals fled poverty, violence, and political turmoil in Europe to settle in the Americas and Oceania during the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
For instance, millions of individuals fled poverty, violence, and political turmoil in Europe to settle in the Americas and Oceania during the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

Oceania

South PacificPacificOceanic
For instance, millions of individuals fled poverty, violence, and political turmoil in Europe to settle in the Americas and Oceania during the 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries.

Freedom of religion

religious freedomreligious libertyreligion
Lack of freedom to choose religion, or to choose no religion;

Cultural imperialism

assimilateculturalcultural colonialism
Cultural fights with other cultural groups;

Auto-segregation

self-segregationother cultural groupsself-segregated
Cultural fights with other cultural groups;

Human overpopulation

overpopulationexpanding human populationoverpopulated
Overpopulation.

Qing dynasty

QingChinaQing China
After 1668, the Qing Emperor banned Han Chinese migration to Manchuria.

Manchuria

ManchurianThree Eastern ProvincesNortheast
After 1668, the Qing Emperor banned Han Chinese migration to Manchuria.

Willow Palisade

were banned
In 1681, the emperor ordered construction of the Willow Palisade, a barrier beyond which the Chinese were prohibited from encroaching on Manchu and Mongol lands.

Soviet Union

SovietUSSRSoviets
The Soviet Socialist Republics of the later Soviet Union began such restrictions in 1918, with laws and borders tightening until even illegal emigration was nearly impossible by 1928.

Passport system in the Soviet Union

internal passportinternal passport controlspassport
To strengthen this, they set up internal passport controls and individual city Propiska ("place of residence") permits, along with internal freedom of movement restrictions often called the 101st kilometre, rules which greatly restricted mobility within even small areas.