Emilio Aguinaldo

AguinaldoGeneral Emilio AguinaldoGen. Emilio AguinaldoEmilio AquinaldoEmilio Aguinaldo y FamyAguinaldo cabinetAquinaldoEmilioEmilio F. AguinaldoGen. Aquinaldo
Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy (: March 22, 1869 – February 6, 1964) was a Filipino revolutionary, politician and military leader who is officially recognized as the first and the youngest President of the Philippines (1899–1901) and first president of a constitutional republic in Asia.wikipedia
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Philippine Revolution

revolutionPhilippine Revolution of 1896revolutionary
He led Philippine forces first against Spain in the latter part of the Philippine Revolution (1896–1898), and then in the Spanish–American War (1898), and finally against the United States during the Philippine–American War (1899–1901).
In particular, rebels in Cavite led by Mariano Álvarez and Emilio Aguinaldo (who were from two different factions of the Katipunan) won major early victories.

Philippine–American War

Philippine-American WarPhilippine InsurrectionFilipino-American War
He led Philippine forces first against Spain in the latter part of the Philippine Revolution (1896–1898), and then in the Spanish–American War (1898), and finally against the United States during the Philippine–American War (1899–1901).
Among those leaders was General Macario Sakay, a veteran Katipunan member who assumed the presidency of the proclaimed Tagalog Republic, formed in 1902 after the capture of President Emilio Aguinaldo.

List of presidents of the Philippines

President of the PhilippinesPresidenttenth
Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy (: March 22, 1869 – February 6, 1964) was a Filipino revolutionary, politician and military leader who is officially recognized as the first and the youngest President of the Philippines (1899–1901) and first president of a constitutional republic in Asia.
Following the ratification of the Malolos Constitution in 1899, Emilio Aguinaldo became the inaugural president of the Malolos Republic, considered the First Philippine Republic.

Cavite

Cavite ProvinceCavite, PhilippinesProvince of Cavite
Emilio Famy Aguinaldo Sr. was born on March 22, 1869 in Cavite el Viejo (present-day Kawit), in Cavite province, to Carlos Jamir Aguinaldo and Trinidad Famy-Aguinaldo, a Tagalog Chinese mestizo couple who had eight children, the seventh of whom was Emilio Sr. The Aguinaldo family was quite well-to-do, as his father, Carlos J. Aguinaldo was the community's appointed gobernadorcillo (municipal governor) in the Spanish colonial administration and his grandparents Eugenio K. Aguinaldo and Maria Jamir-Aguinaldo.
Led by Emilio Aguinaldo, Caviteños made lightning raids on Spanish headquarters, and soon liberated the entire province through the Battle of Alapan.

Kawit revolt

Cavite El Viejouprisings
On August 31, 1896, Aguinaldo started the assault beginning as a skirmish to a full blown revolt (Kawit Revolt).
Captain Emilio Aguinaldo led some 400 men to the town hall of Kawit, guarded by a few Guardia Civil there.

Baldomero Aguinaldo

BaldomeroBaldomero Aguinaldo y BaloyGen. Baldomero Aguinaldo
The local chapter of Katipunan in Cavite was established and named Sangguniang Magdalo, and Aguinaldo's cousin Baldomero Aguinaldo was appointed leader.
He was the first cousin of Emilio Aguinaldo, the first president of the Philippines, as well as the grandfather of Cesar Virata, a former prime minister in the 1980s.

Philippines

FilipinoPhilippinePhilippine Islands
Emilio Aguinaldo y Famy (: March 22, 1869 – February 6, 1964) was a Filipino revolutionary, politician and military leader who is officially recognized as the first and the youngest President of the Philippines (1899–1901) and first president of a constitutional republic in Asia.
A faction of the Katipunan, the Magdalo of Cavite province, eventually came to challenge Bonifacio's position as the leader of the revolution and Emilio Aguinaldo took over.

Spanish–American War

Spanish-American Warwar with SpainSpanish American War
He led Philippine forces first against Spain in the latter part of the Philippine Revolution (1896–1898), and then in the Spanish–American War (1898), and finally against the United States during the Philippine–American War (1899–1901).
Commodore Dewey transported Emilio Aguinaldo, a Filipino leader who had led rebellion against Spanish rule in the Philippines in 1896, from exile in Hong Kong to the Philippines to rally more Filipinos against the Spanish colonial government.

Críspulo Aguinaldo

Crispulo Aguinaldo
In March 1897, a stalemated battle between the revolutionary army of Crispulo Aguinaldo, while taking over General Emilio Aguinaldo's leadership in battle, and the Spanish forces, led by José de Lachambre, occurred in this trail.
Críspulo Aguinaldo y Famy (June 10, 1863 – March 24, 1897) was a native of Kawit, Cavite the older brother of Emilio Aguinaldo and lieutenant general who heroically defended in the Battle of Pasong Santol.

Colegio de San Juan de Letran

LetranLetran CollegeColegio de San Juan de Letrán
He studied at Colegio de San Juan de Letran but wasn't able to finish his studies due to outbreak of cholera in 1882.

Mariano Trías

Mariano Trias Mariano Trias y ClosasGen. Mariano Trías
There The Republic of the Philippines was proclaimed, with Aguinaldo being elected as President, Mariano Trias as Vice-President, Artemio Ricarte as Captain-General, Emiliano Riego de Dios as the Director of War and Andres Bonifacio as Director of the Interior.
When that assembly broke into factions, a truce known as the Pact of Biak-na-Bato was signed by the group and also recognized the elected officials and Trias as the vice president of Emilio Aguinaldo, who is also considered to be the first President of the Philippines.

Battle of Zapote Bridge (1897)

Battle of Zapote Bridgebattle of ZapoteLabanan sa Zapote
Having just won the battle of Zapote, Aguinaldo turned his attention at the new Spanish threat determined to recapture most of Cavite.
Filipino revolutionary forces led by General Emilio Aguinaldo defeated Spanish forces under the command of Governor-General Camilo de Polavieja.

Battle of Perez Dasmariñas

Pasong SantolBattle of Pasong SantolPerez Dasmariñas
Emilio Aguinaldo realizing the size of the enemy and the danger of the situation, sent Magdalo troops to reinforce the threatened salient but Supremo Andres Bonifacio summoned Magdiwang troops under Artemio Ricarte to intercept the Magdalo troops to Pasong Santol thus preventing help to the revolutionary soldiers, citing he needed the soldiers elsewhere.
The Battle of Perez Dasmariñas (, Batalla de Perez Dasmariñas) occurred during the Cavite Offensive of 1897, an all-out attack commanded by Maj. Gen. Jose de Lachambre to recapture Cavite in the Philippines since their loss at the twin battles of Binakayan and Dalahican and to crush the Katipunan insurrection, led by Emilio Aguinaldo in the province.

Battle of Imus

Imusone of the great battlessiege
Alarmed by previous siege, led by General Aguinaldo in Imus, Cavite in September 1896, Governor-General Ramón Blanco y Erenas ordered the 4th Battalion of Cazadores from Spain to aid him in quelling the rebellion in Cavite.
Emilio Aguinaldo began the revolution in the province by staging the Kawit Revolt on August 31, 1896.

Indang

Indang, Cavite
In April 1897, Aguinaldo ordered the arrest of Bonifacio on some information alleging Bonifacio's involvement in some events at Indang.
It belongs to the Magdiwang faction, which rivaled the Magdalo faction headed by Emilio Aguinaldo.

Imus

Imus, CaviteImus CityImus City, Cavite
Alarmed by previous siege, led by General Aguinaldo in Imus, Cavite in September 1896, Governor-General Ramón Blanco y Erenas ordered the 4th Battalion of Cazadores from Spain to aid him in quelling the rebellion in Cavite.
On May 28, 1898, Imus gained its independence from Spanish colonial rule after the last remaining stronghold of forces from the Spanish empire had been defeated in the Battle of Alapan as headed by General Emilio Aguinaldo.

Magdalo (Katipunan faction)

MagdaloMagdalo CouncilMagdalo faction
Aguinaldo joined the organization and used the nom de guerre Magdalo, in honor of Mary Magdalene.
It was officially led by Baldomero Aguinaldo, but his cousin Emilio Aguinaldo (whose own Katipunan codename was "Magdalo") was its most famous leader.

Rizal

Rizal ProvinceProvince of RizalMorong
Apart from defending Binakayan, the Magdalo soldiers also kept the lower part of Dagatan up to Cavite's border near Morong province (now Rizal province).
The town of Mariquina (Marikina) became the capital of the Province of Manila during the tenure of the revolutionary government of Gen. Emilio Aguinaldo.

Katipunan

KatipunerosKatipuneroAng Kalayaan
On March 7, 1895, Santiago Alvarez, whose father was a Capitan Municipal (Mayor) of Noveleta, encouraged Aguinaldo to join the "Katipunan", a secret organization led by Andrés Bonifacio, dedicated to the expulsion of the Spanish and independence of the Philippines through armed force.
No less than one of the greatest generals in the Philippines' history, General Emilio Aguinaldo who became first Philippine president visited this sacred ground in the late 1950s.

San Miguel, Bulacan

San MiguelSan Miguel de Mayumo San Miguel
On June 24, 1897 Aguinaldo arrived at Biak-na-Bato in San Miguel, Bulacan, and established a headquarters there, located in Biak-na-Bato National Park in what is now known as Aguinaldo Cave.
During the Philippine Revolution in 1897, newly appointed Governor-General Fernando Primo de Rivera decided to crush Emilio Aguinaldo and his troops in Cavite, but Aguinaldo fled to Batangas and joined forces with Gen. Miguel Malvar.

Battle of Alapan

Alapanbattlevictory
On May 28, 1898, Aguinaldo gathered a force of about 18,000 troops and fought against a small garrison of Spanish troops in Alapan, Imus, Cavite.
The Battle of Alapan (, Batalla de Alapan) was fought on May 28, 1898, and was the first military victory of Emilio Aguinaldo after his return to the Philippines from Hong Kong.

Pact of Biak-na-Bato

Pact of Biak na Batoa truce with Spanish authoritiesan agreement was reached
On December 14–15, 1897, Aguinaldo signed the Pact of Biak-na-Bato, under which Aguinaldo effectively agreed to end hostilities and dissolve his government in exchange for amnesty and "₱800,000 (Mexican)" (Aguinaldo's description of the $MXN800,000 amount) as an indemnity.
The Pact of Biak-na-Bato, signed on December 15, 1897, created a truce between Spanish colonial Governor-General Fernando Primo de Rivera and the revolutionary leader Emilio Aguinaldo to end the Philippine Revolution.

Manuel Tinio

Manuel Tinio y BundocGen. Manuel TinioGeneral Manuel Bundoc Tinio
However, some of them joined General Manuel Tinio's revolutionary army in Nueva Ecija, where they decisively won the Battle of Aliaga, "The glorious Battle of the Rebellion", only a few weeks after the retreat.
The aggressive exploits of the teen-aged Manuel Tinio reached the ears of General Emilio Aguinaldo, whose forces were being driven out of Cavite and Laguna, Philippines.

José Tagle

Jose Tagle
On September 1, with the aid of Captain Jose Tagle of Imus, they laid siege against Imus Estate to draw the Spanish out.
According to General Emilio Aguinaldo’s account of the battle, José Tagle, then head of Barangay Pilar of Imus, first came to his headquarters at Cavite El Viejo on September 1, 1896 to ask for his aid in raiding Imus.

Artemio Ricarte

General Artemio RicarteArtemio "Vibora" RicarteArtemio Ricarte (Vibora)
There The Republic of the Philippines was proclaimed, with Aguinaldo being elected as President, Mariano Trias as Vice-President, Artemio Ricarte as Captain-General, Emiliano Riego de Dios as the Director of War and Andres Bonifacio as Director of the Interior.
On March 22, 1897,during the Tejeros Convention, Ricarte was unanimously elected Captain-General and received a military promotion to Brigadier-General in Emilio Aguinaldo's army.