A report on Emoticon

A smiley-face emoticon
Examples of kaomoji smileys
Cover of the French magazine Le Charivari, text of a legal ruling against it in the shape of a pear, 1834.
Transcript of a speech by Abraham Lincoln in 1862
"Typographical art" published in the March 30, 1881 issue of Puck
Kaomoji on a Japanese NTT Docomo mobile phone
A Kaomoji painting in Japan
The Japanese custom of dogeza
Patented drop down menu for composing phone mail text message with emoticons.

Emote, is a pictorial representation of a facial expression using characters—usually punctuation marks, numbers, and letters—to express a person's feelings, mood or reaction, or as a time-saving method.

- Emoticon
A smiley-face emoticon

21 related topics with Alpha

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The "Grinning Face" emoji, from the Twemoji set

Emoji

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Pictogram, logogram, ideogram or smiley embedded in text and used in electronic messages and web pages.

Pictogram, logogram, ideogram or smiley embedded in text and used in electronic messages and web pages.

The "Grinning Face" emoji, from the Twemoji set
Emoji being added to a text message
Wingdings icons, including smiling and frowning faces
Smiley faces from DOS code page 437
Behaviour of the and format controls with various types of character, including emoji.

They are much like emoticons, but emoji are pictures rather than typographic approximations; the term "emoji" in the strict sense refers to such pictures which can be represented as encoded characters, but it is sometimes applied to messaging stickers by extension.

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Face with Tears of Joy emoji

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Emoji that represents a crying with laughter facial expression.

Emoji that represents a crying with laughter facial expression.

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While it is broadly referred to as an emoji, since it is used to demonstrate emotion, it is also referred to as an emoticon.

Carnegie Mellon University

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Private research university based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Private research university based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The main campus in Pittsburgh as seen from the 36th floor of the Cathedral of Learning at the University of Pittsburgh, August 2015.
Hamerschlag, Roberts, and Scott Halls are three of the teaching facilities of the College of Engineering
Wean Hall, home of the world's first internet-enabled soda vending machine.
The Gates Hillman Complex, which houses the School of Computer Science.
Cohon University Center, which contains an indoor swimming pool, bookstore, student club facilities, gym, and cafeteria.
The Tepper Quadrangle, which includes the new home of the Tepper School of Business, opened in 2018.
Posner Hall, former home of the Tepper School of Business
The Scarab lunar rover is being developed by the RI.
The Software Engineering Institute building on Fifth Avenue.
Part of Carnegie Mellon's Education City campus in Qatar.
Margaret Morrison Carnegie Hall, home of the Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture and Carnegie Mellon School of Design
Inside the Gates-Hillman Complex of the School of Computer Science.
Carnegie Mellon's Entertainment Technology Center.
Hunt Library is the largest library on Carnegie Mellon's Pittsburgh campus.
Simplified evolution of Unix systems. The Mach kernel was a fork from BSD 4.3 that led to NeXTSTEP / OPENSTEP, upon which macOS and iOS is based.
The Fence
Two pushers exchange the buggy for Kappa Delta Rho on the first hill of Sweepstakes.
A Mobot competing in the annual Mobot challenge
Carnegie Mellon tennis courts.
Football at Gesling Stadium.
Charles Wilson, former US Secretary of Defense
John Forbes Nash, winner of the 1994 Nobel Prize in Economics
Edgar Mitchell, NASA astronaut and sixth man to walk on the moon
David Tepper, billionaire hedge fund investor and owner of the Carolina Panthers
Andreas Bechtolsheim, co-founder of Sun Microsystems
James Gosling, inventor of Java
Andy Warhol, pop artist
Stephanie Kwolek, Inventor of Kevlar
Charles Geschke, chairman and co-founder of Adobe Systems
Randy Pausch, author of The Last Lecture
Michael Chabon, Pulitzer Prize-winning novelist (Did not graduate)
George A. Romero, director of Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead
Josh Groban, singer-songwriter and actor (Did not graduate)
Van Dyke Parks, musician, composer, arranger, and producer (Did not graduate)
Henry Mancini, film composer and recipient of twenty Grammy Awards (Did not graduate)
Stephen Schwartz, musical theater composer for Wicked, Pippin, and Godspell
Kurt Vonnegut, author of Slaughterhouse-Five and Cat's Cradle (Did not graduate)
Zachary Quinto, actor known for Heroes and Star Trek
Holly Hunter, Academy Award-winning actress
Matt Bomer, actor known for White Collar, Magic Mike, and The Boys in the Band
Sutton Foster, Tony Award-winning actress for Thoroughly Modern Millie and Anything Goes; star of Younger
Ted Danson, Emmy Award-winning actor known for Cheers and CSI
Josh Gad, actor known for The Book of Mormon, Frozen, and Beauty and the Beast
Joe Manganiello, actor known for True Blood and Magic Mike
Steven Bochco, ten-time Emmy Award recipient
Cote de Pablo, actress known for NCIS

Emoticon – The first true emoticon was developed at Carnegie Mellon by Scott Fahlman in 1982.

Photo of Scott Elliott Fahlman

Scott Fahlman

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Computer scientist and Professor Emeritus at Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute and Computer Science Department.

Computer scientist and Professor Emeritus at Carnegie Mellon University's Language Technologies Institute and Computer Science Department.

Photo of Scott Elliott Fahlman

Fahlman is credited with originating the first smiley emoticon, which he thought would help people on a message board at Carnegie Mellon to distinguish serious posts from jokes.

Emoticons (Unicode block)

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Emoticons is a Unicode block containing emoticons or emoji.

15th century Bible text in Ge'ez script showing colons between the words.

Colon (punctuation)

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Punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots aligned vertically.

Punctuation mark consisting of two equally sized dots aligned vertically.

15th century Bible text in Ge'ez script showing colons between the words.

Colons can also be used to represent eyes in emoticons.

A man wearing a tiara, a tie, and a pair of glasses with a beverage "shrugs" at the camera.

Shrug

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Gesture performed by raising both shoulders, and is a representation of an individual either being indifferent about something or not knowing an answer to a question.

Gesture performed by raising both shoulders, and is a representation of an individual either being indifferent about something or not knowing an answer to a question.

A man wearing a tiara, a tie, and a pair of glasses with a beverage "shrugs" at the camera.

The shrug emoticon, made from Unicode characters, is also typed as ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, where "ツ" is the character tsu from Japanese katakana.

The acronym written out on a "smiley" from the CC0-licensed Lol Collection

LOL

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Initialism for laughing out loud and a popular element of Internet slang.

Initialism for laughing out loud and a popular element of Internet slang.

The acronym written out on a "smiley" from the CC0-licensed Lol Collection
A lolcat using "LOL"
Richard Nixon laughing out loud in 1969 (prior to the invention of the initialism LOL)
The OMEGALUL emote
An animated ASCII art image popularized in 2004 by memes using the word "roflcopter"

The list of acronyms "grows by the month" (said Peter Hershock in 2003), and they are collected along with emoticons and smileys into folk dictionaries that are circulated informally amongst users of Usenet, IRC, and other forms of (textual) computer-mediated communication.

Stroke order in writing つ

Tsu (kana)

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One of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora.

One of the Japanese kana, each of which represents one mora.

Stroke order in writing つ
Stroke order in writing ツ

The katakana form has become popular as an emoticon in the Western world due to its resemblance to a smiling face and as part of a "shrug" emoticon, known alternatively as Shruggie, rendered as: ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

Semicolon

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Symbol commonly used as orthographic punctuation.

Symbol commonly used as orthographic punctuation.

The semicolon is commonly used as parts of emoticons, in order to indicate winking or crying, as in and.