Emperor Jimmu

Jimmu2600th anniversary660 BCEmperor Jinmufirst Emperor of JapanJin Mu TennoJinmu紀元二千六百年記念行事 (2600th anniversary)
Emperor Jimmu was the first Emperor of Japan, according to legend.wikipedia
216 Related Articles

Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese Emperor
Emperor Jimmu was the first Emperor of Japan, according to legend.
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.

Ninigi-no-Mikoto

Ninigi
According to Japanese mythology, he is a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu, through her grandson Ninigi, as well as a descendant of the storm god Susanoo. The Imperial House of Japan traditionally based its claim to the throne on its putative descent from the sun-goddess Amaterasu via Jimmu's great grandfather Ninigi.
He was the great-grandfather of Emperor Jimmu.

Kojiki

ancient Japanese mythKojiki-denKōjiki
Jimmu is recorded as Japan's first ruler in two early chronicles, Nihon Shoki (721) and Kojiki (712).
The Kamitsumaki, also known as the Kamiyo no Maki, includes the preface of the Kojiki, and is focused on the deities of creation and the births of various deities of the kamiyo period, or Age of the Gods. The Kamitsumaki also outlines the myths concerning the foundation of Japan. It describes how Ninigi-no-Mikoto, grandson of Amaterasu and great-grandfather of Emperor Jimmu, descended from heaven to Takachihonomine in Kyūshū and became the progenitor of the Japanese imperial line.

Nihon Shoki

Nihongieight emperors without specific legends associated with them
Jimmu is recorded as Japan's first ruler in two early chronicles, Nihon Shoki (721) and Kojiki (712).
Chapter 03: (Emperor Jimmu) Kan'yamato Iwarebiko no Sumeramikoto.

Age of the Gods

the Age of the Gods
In Japanese mythology, the Age of the Gods is the period before Jimmu's accession.
In Japanese mythology, the Age of the Gods is the period preceding the accession of Jimmu, the first Emperor of Japan.

Nakatomi clan

NakatomiNakatomi familyNakatomi no Kamako
This practice had begun under Empress Suiko, and took root after the Taika Reforms with the ascendancy of the Nakatomi clan.
It is said that soon after the beginning of Jimmu's reign, a Master of Ceremonies (saishu) was appointed; and this office was commonly held by a member of the Nakatomi clan after the 8th century.

Emperor Suizei

Suizeisecond
Third son: Prince Kamununakawamimi later Emperor Suizei
According to its account Suizei was the younger son of Jimmu's chief wife, Isukeyorihime.

Japanese mythology

JapanesemythologyJapanese folklore
According to Japanese mythology, he is a descendant of the sun goddess Amaterasu, through her grandson Ninigi, as well as a descendant of the storm god Susanoo. In Japanese mythology, the Age of the Gods is the period before Jimmu's accession.
Ugaya married his aunt, the sea princess Tamayori and had five children, including Iwarebiko, who was later to become Emperor Jimmu.

Mononobe clan

MononobeMononobe familyMononobe no Igui
The story of Jimmu seems to rework legends associated with the Ōtomo clan, and its function was to establish that clan's links to the ruling family, just as those of Suijin arguably reflect Mononobe tales and the legends in Ōjin's chronicles seem to derive from Soga clan traditions.
The Mononobe were said to have been descended from Nigihayahi no Mikoto,, a legendary figure who is said to have ruled Yamato before the conquest of Emperor Jimmu.

Ōmi no Mifune

Nihon Shoki gives the dates of his reign as 660–585 BC. In the reign of Emperor Kanmu (737-806 AD), the eighth-century scholar Ōmi no Mifune designated rulers before Ōjin as tennō, a Japanese pendant to the Chinese imperial title Tiān-dì, and gave several of them including Jimmu their canonical names.
Between 762 and 764 he set the names of Emperor Jinmu, Emperor Suizei, Emperor Annei and so on.

Ugayafukiaezu

Ugaya
Jimmu figures as a direct descendant of the sun goddess, Amaterasu via the side of his father, Ugayafukiaezu.
Ugayafukiaezu no Mikoto "Unfinished Cormorant-Feather Thatching" 鵜葺草葺不合命, commonly shortened to Ugayafukiaezu, is a Japanese kami, and in Japanese mythology, he is the father of Japan's first emperor, Emperor Jimmu.

Imperial House of Japan

YamatoImperial FamilyJapanese imperial family
The Imperial House of Japan traditionally based its claim to the throne on its putative descent from the sun-goddess Amaterasu via Jimmu's great grandfather Ninigi.
The imperial house recognizes 125 monarchs beginning with the legendary Emperor Jimmu (traditionally dated to 11 February 660 BC) and continuing up to the current emperor, Akihito; see its family tree.

National Foundation Day

Foundation DayKigensetsu11 February
In modern Japan, Jimmu's accession is marked as National Foundation Day on February 11.
National Foundation Day is a national holiday in Japan celebrated annually on February 11, celebrating the mythological foundation of Japan and the accession of its first emperor, Emperor Jimmu at Kashihara gū on 11 February 660 BC.

Tagishimimi

Tagishimimi no Mikoto
First son: Prince Tagishimimi
He was the son of Emperor Jimmu, the legendary founder of Japan, by one of his concubines, and he plotted to murder his half-brothers in order to inherit Jimmu's throne.

Kashihara, Nara

KashiharaYagi
The traditional site of Jimmu's grave is near Unebiyama in Kashihara.
The exact spot of Emperor Jimmu's descent to earth was debated for centuries until in 1863 an area that is now part of the city was claimed to be the exact location.

Tamayori-hime

Tamayori
The boy was abandoned by his parents at birth and consequently raised by Tamayori-hime, his mother's younger sister.
And after, Tamayori-hime married Ugayafukiaezu and Itsuse, Inahi, Mikenu, Wakamikenu (若御毛沼命; Emperor Jimmu) were born.

Modern system of ranked Shinto shrines

ranked, nationally significant shrinesKokuhei ChūshaKanpei-taisha
Modern system of ranked Shinto shrines
Right: Front. Emperor Kōmei (seated in foreground), Empress Go-Sakuramachi (here presented as a man with a false goatee), and Emperor Jinmu (carrying a rough bow and perched eagle. Rear. The kami Amaterasu (standing and holding the three Sacred Treasures of Japan) and Ninigi-no-Mikoto (who first brought to earth the Imperial regalia—the sword, Kusanagi, the mirror, Yata no Kagami, and the jewel, Yasakani no magatama).

Hakkō ichiu

hakko ichiudivine rightdivine right of the Empire of Japan to "unify the eight corners of the world
Before and during World War II, expansionist propaganda made frequent use of the phrase hakkō ichiu, a term coined by Tanaka Chigaku based on a passage in the Nihon Shoki discussing Emperor Jimmu.
The term was coined early in the 20th century by Nichiren Buddhist activist and nationalist Tanaka Chigaku, who cobbled it from parts of a statement attributed in the chronicle Nihon Shoki to legendary first emperor Jinmu at the time of his ascension.

Toyotama-hime

OtohimePrincess OtohimePrincess Toyotama
Among their three sons was Hikohohodemi no Mikoto, also called Yamasachi-hiko, who married Toyotama-hime.
As Ugayafukiaezu grew of age, he married his aunt and eventually conceived a child, Jimmu, who became the first Emperor of Japan.

Ryūjin

Dragon Goddragon god of the seaDragon King
She was the daughter of Ryūjin, the Japanese sea god.
The first Emperor of Japan, Emperor Jimmu, is said to have been a grandson of Otohime and Hoori's.

Hoori

HikohohodemiHiko-hohodemiHoori no mikoto
Among their three sons was Hikohohodemi no Mikoto, also called Yamasachi-hiko, who married Toyotama-hime.
Ugayafukiaezu married Toyotama-hime's sister, who brought him up, and she gave birth to Emperor Jimmu, who is known as the first Emperor of Japan.

Kashihara Shrine

Kashihara JingūKashihara gūKashihara jinjū
In 1890 Kashihara Shrine was established nearby, on the spot where Jimmu was said to have ascended to the throne.
Kashihara Shrine was built on 2 April 1890 at the site of the Kashihara-gū where Japan's first emperor, Emperor Jimmu, is said to have acceded to the throne on 11 February 660 BCE.

Emishi

EbisuEmishi peopleThirty-Eight Year War
Emishi people
The record of Emperor Jimmu in the Nihon Shoki mentions the "Emishi" with ateji—whom his armed forces defeated before he was enthroned as the Emperor of Japan.

Kotoshironushi

Empress: Himetataraisuzu-hime, Kotoshironushi’s daughter
His daughter Himetataraisuzuhime became the consort of Emperor Jimmu.

Japanese imperial year

2,600th anniversaryImperial yearJapanese ''Kōki'' calendar
Japanese imperial year
It is based on the legendary foundation of Japan by Emperor Jimmu in 660 BC.