Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou

Emperor MingYuwen YuMing DiMing
Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou (534–560), personal name Yuwen Yu, Xianbei name Tongwantu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, although at the start of his reign he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang).wikipedia
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Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou

Emperor WuYuwen YongWu Di
While near death, however, Emperor Ming appointed his brother Yuwen Yong (Emperor Wu) as his successor, believing Yuwen Yong to be intelligent and capable, and in 572, Yuwen Yong was finally able to kill Yuwen Hu and assume full imperial powers.
As was the case of the reigns of his brothers Emperor Xiaomin and Emperor Ming, the early part of his reign was dominated by his cousin Yuwen Hu, but in 572 he ambushed Yuwen Hu and seized power personally.

Yuwen Hu

He was made emperor after his younger brother Emperor Xiaomin was deposed and killed by the regent Yuwen Hu.
However, Yuwen Hu dominated the political scene, and after Emperor Xiaomin tried to seize power later that year, he killed Emperor Xiaomin and replaced him with another son of Yuwen Tai, Emperor Ming.

Emperor Xiaomin of Northern Zhou

Yuwen JueEmperor XiaominXiaomin
He was made emperor after his younger brother Emperor Xiaomin was deposed and killed by the regent Yuwen Hu. His wife Princess Fengyi, the sister of Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei, had one son, Yuwen Jue, but he considered the fact of whether making Yuwen Jue heir apparent over Yuwen Yu would trouble Dugu Xin.
Later in 557, however, Yuwen Jue, wanting to assume power personally, plotted to kill Yuwen Hu, who in turn deposed him and replaced him with his brother Yuwen Yu (Emperor Ming).

Northern Zhou

Northern Zhou dynastyZhou dynastyfrom China
Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou (534–560), personal name Yuwen Yu, Xianbei name Tongwantu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, although at the start of his reign he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang).
The reigns of the first three emperors (Yuwen Tai's sons) – Emperor Xiaomin, Emperor Ming, and Emperor Wu were dominated by Yuwen Hu, until Emperor Wu ambushed and killed Yuwen Hu in 572 and assumed power personally.

Empress Dugu (Northern Zhou)

Empress Dugudaughtereldest daughter
During his term as a provincial governor, he married the daughter of the key general Dugu Xin as his wife.
Empress Dugu or Queen Dugu (獨孤王后, personal name unknown) (died 558), posthumously Empress Mingjing, was the wife of the Emperor Ming (Yuwen Yu), the founder of the Chinese/Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou.

Yuwen Tai

Emperor WenYu-Wen Tai
Yuwen Yu was born in 534, as the oldest son of the then-Northern Wei general Yuwen Tai.
His wife Princess Pingyi had one son, Yuwen Jue, but his oldest son, Yuwen Yu, was born of his concubine Lady Yao, and was married to the daughter of one of his chief generals, Dugu Xin.

Dugu Xin

During his term as a provincial governor, he married the daughter of the key general Dugu Xin as his wife.
He rose to high ranks under Yuwen Tai, and his eldest daughter married Yuwen Tai's son Yuwen Yu.

Xianbei

Xianbei languageXianbicolonised by Turkic people
Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou (534–560), personal name Yuwen Yu, Xianbei name Tongwantu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, although at the start of his reign he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang).

Emperor

empressemperorsSamraat
Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou (534–560), personal name Yuwen Yu, Xianbei name Tongwantu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, although at the start of his reign he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang).

Heavenly King

Tian WangTianwangheavenly prince
Emperor Ming of Northern Zhou (534–560), personal name Yuwen Yu, Xianbei name Tongwantu, was an emperor of the Xianbei dynasty Northern Zhou, although at the start of his reign he used the alternative title "Heavenly Prince" (Tian Wang).

Regent

regencyregentsQueen Regent
He was made emperor after his younger brother Emperor Xiaomin was deposed and killed by the regent Yuwen Hu.

Northern Wei

Northern Wei DynastyWeiand future dynasties
Yuwen Yu was born in 534, as the oldest son of the then-Northern Wei general Yuwen Tai.

Concubinage

concubineconcubinesconcubin
His mother was Yuwen Tai's concubine Lady Yao.

Tongwancheng

Tongwan
His nickname of Tongwantu was derived from the fact that Lady Yao gave birth to him at the important city of Tongwan (統萬, in modern Yulin, Shaanxi) while accompanying Yuwen Tai on an inspection of the city.

Yulin, Shaanxi

YulinYulin CityLake Hongjiannao
His nickname of Tongwantu was derived from the fact that Lady Yao gave birth to him at the important city of Tongwan (統萬, in modern Yulin, Shaanxi) while accompanying Yuwen Tai on an inspection of the city.

Shaanxi

Shaanxi ProvinceShensiShǎnxī
His nickname of Tongwantu was derived from the fact that Lady Yao gave birth to him at the important city of Tongwan (統萬, in modern Yulin, Shaanxi) while accompanying Yuwen Tai on an inspection of the city.

Western Wei

Western Wei dynasty
Also in 534, Northern Wei divided into two rival states, Western Wei and Eastern Wei, with Yuwen Tai as the paramount general of Western Wei.

Eastern Wei

Dong WeiEastern Wei dynastyEastern
Also in 534, Northern Wei divided into two rival states, Western Wei and Eastern Wei, with Yuwen Tai as the paramount general of Western Wei.

Emperor Wen of Western Wei

Emperor WenWen DiYuan Baoju
In 548, Emperor Wen of Western Wei, to further honor Yuwen Tai, created Yuwen Yu the Duke of Ningdu.

Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei

Emperor XiaowuYuan XiuXiao Wu Di
His wife Princess Fengyi, the sister of Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei, had one son, Yuwen Jue, but he considered the fact of whether making Yuwen Jue heir apparent over Yuwen Yu would trouble Dugu Xin.

Heir apparent

heir-apparentheirs apparentheir
His wife Princess Fengyi, the sister of Emperor Xiaowu of Northern Wei, had one son, Yuwen Jue, but he considered the fact of whether making Yuwen Jue heir apparent over Yuwen Yu would trouble Dugu Xin.