Emperor Taishō

TaishōYoshihitoTaishō EmperorEmperor TaishoTaishoCrown PrinceCrown Prince YoshihitoEmperorEmperor YoshihitoCrown Prince Tōgu
Emperor Taishō was the 123rd Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.wikipedia
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Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
He reigned as the Emperor of the Empire of Japan from 30 July 1912 until his death on 25 December 1926.
The Emperors during this time, which spanned the entire Meiji, Taishō, and the lesser part of the Shōwa era, are now known in Japan by their posthumous names, which coincide with those era names: Emperor Meiji (Mutsuhito), Emperor Taishō (Yoshihito), and Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito).

Emperor Meiji

Meiji EmperorMeijiMutsuhito
Prince Yoshihito was born at the Tōgū Palace in Akasaka, Tokyo to Emperor Meiji and Yanagihara Naruko, a concubine with the official title of gon-no-tenji ("lady of the bedchamber").
Prince Yoshihito (later Emperor Taishō) was the only male heir who lived to adulthood, but his body and mind were weak, with meningitis, diabetes, cerebral thrombosis, and mental illness.

Yanagihara Naruko

Lady Naruko
Prince Yoshihito was born at the Tōgū Palace in Akasaka, Tokyo to Emperor Meiji and Yanagihara Naruko, a concubine with the official title of gon-no-tenji ("lady of the bedchamber").
A concubine of Emperor Meiji, she was the mother of Emperor Taishō and the last concubine to have given birth to a reigning Japanese emperor.

Concubinage

concubineconcubinesconcubin
Prince Yoshihito was born at the Tōgū Palace in Akasaka, Tokyo to Emperor Meiji and Yanagihara Naruko, a concubine with the official title of gon-no-tenji ("lady of the bedchamber").
Yanagihara Naruko, a high-ranking concubine of Emperor Meiji, gave birth to Emperor Taishō, who was later legally adopted by Empress Haruko, Emperor Meiji's formal wife.

Empress Shōken

Empress HarukoMasako IchijōEmpress Masako
As was common practice at the time, Emperor Meiji's consort, Empress Shōken, was officially regarded as his mother.
Yoshihito thus became the official heir to the throne, and at Emperor Meiji's death, succeeded him as Emperor Taishō.

Empress Teimei

EmpressSadako KujōCrown Princess Sadako
On 10 May 1900, Crown Prince Yoshihito married the then 15-year-old Kujō Sadako (the future Empress Teimei), daughter of Prince Kujō Michitaka, the head of the five senior branches of the Fujiwara clan.
Empress Teimei, born Sadako Kujō, was the wife of Emperor Taishō and the mother of Emperor Shōwa of Japan.

Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese Emperor
Emperor Taishō was the 123rd Emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.
In recent times, Emperor Taishō had Count Nogi Maresuke, Emperor Shōwa had Marshal-Admiral Marquis Tōgō Heihachirō, and Emperor Akihito had Elizabeth Gray Vining as well as Shinzō Koizumi as their tutors.

Gakushūin

GakushuinPeeresses' SchoolGakushuin Peers' School
In September 1887, Yoshihito entered the elementary department of the Gakushūin; but, due to his health problems, he was often unable to continue his studies.

Nakayama Tadayasu

As was the practice at the time, Prince Yoshihito was entrusted to the care of his great-grandfather, Marquess Nakayama Tadayasu, in whose house he lived from infancy until the age of seven.
Nakayama was entrusted with the upbringing of his grandson, Mutsuhito, the future Emperor Meiji, and many years later with that of his great-grandson Yoshihito, another future emperor.

Tōgū Palace

Togu Palace
Prince Yoshihito was born at the Tōgū Palace in Akasaka, Tokyo to Emperor Meiji and Yanagihara Naruko, a concubine with the official title of gon-no-tenji ("lady of the bedchamber").
The site used to be the Ōmiya Palace, the residence of Empress Teimei, the consort of Emperor Taishō.

Setsuko, Princess Chichibu

Princess ChichibuMatsudaira SetsukoPrincess Setsuko
The Princess was the wife of Prince Chichibu, the second son of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei.

Kikuko, Princess Takamatsu

Princess TakamatsuKikuko TokugawaPrincess Takamatsu Cancer Research Award
The Princess was the widow of Prince Takamatsu, the third son of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei.

Yuriko, Princess Mikasa

Princess MikasaYuriko TakagiHIH The Princess Mikasa
Yuriko, Princess Mikasa (born Yuriko Takagi ; 4 June 1923), is a member of the Imperial House of Japan as the widow of Takahito, Prince Mikasa, the fourth son of Emperor Taishō and Empress Teimei.

Kujō Michitaka

Michitaka KujōKujo MichitakaMichitaka
On 10 May 1900, Crown Prince Yoshihito married the then 15-year-old Kujō Sadako (the future Empress Teimei), daughter of Prince Kujō Michitaka, the head of the five senior branches of the Fujiwara clan.
One of his daughters, Sadako married Emperor Taishō.

Japanese era name

nengōera nameera
After death, he is known by a posthumous name, which is the name of the era coinciding with his reign.

Hirohito

Emperor HirohitoEmperor ShōwaShōwa
After 1919, he undertook no official duties, and Crown Prince Hirohito was named prince regent (sesshō) on 25 November 1921.
Born in Tokyo's Aoyama Palace (during the reign of his grandfather, Emperor Meiji) on 29 April 1901, Hirohito was the first son of 21-year-old Crown Prince Yoshihito (the future Emperor Taishō) and 17-year-old Crown Princess Sadako (the future Empress Teimei).

Prince Arisugawa Takehito

Arisugawa TakehitoPrince Takehito ArisugawaPrince and Princess Arisugawa
However, he did appear to have an aptitude for languages and continued to receive extensive tutoring in French, Chinese, and history from private tutors at the Akasaka Palace; Emperor Meiji gave Prince Takehito responsibility for taking care of Prince Yoshihito, and the two princes became friends.
However, his boyhood friend Prince Yoshihito, Emperor Taishō, revived the house (which reverted to its original name of Takamatsu-no-miya) in favor of his third son, Prince Takamatsu Nobuhito.

Sesshō and Kampaku

kampakuSesshōSesshō/Kampaku
After 1919, he undertook no official duties, and Crown Prince Hirohito was named prince regent (sesshō) on 25 November 1921.
Crown Prince Hirohito, before becoming Emperor Shōwa, was sesshō from 1921 to 1926 for the mentally disabled Emperor Taishō.

Japan during World War I

Japan's participation in World War IWorld War Iactions
The two-party political system that had been developing in Japan since the turn of the century came of age after World War I, giving rise to the nickname for the period, "Taishō Democracy", prompting a shift in political power to the Imperial Diet of Japan and the democratic parties.
Japan sent Germany an ultimatum on 23 August 1914, which went unanswered; Japan then formally declared war on Germany on 23 August 1914 in the name of the Emperor Taishō.

Order of the Chrysanthemum

Supreme Order of the ChrysanthemumGrand Cordon of the Order of the ChrysanthemumGrand Cordon of the Supreme Order of the Chrysanthemum

1923 Great Kantō earthquake

Great Kantō earthquakeGreat Kanto earthquake1923 Great Kanto Earthquake
Taishō's reclusive life was unaffected by the Great Kantō Earthquake of 1923.
The Emperor and Empress were staying at Nikko when the earthquake struck Tokyo, and were never in any danger.

Hayama Imperial Villa

HayamaOdawara Imperial Villa
Taishō died of a heart attack at 1:25 a.m. in the early morning of 25 December 1926, at the Hayama Imperial Villa at Hayama, on Sagami Bay south of Tokyo (in Kanagawa Prefecture).
The villa was a favorite of Emperor Taishō and he often visited to convalesce from his illnesses and to escape from the stresses of his official duties in Tokyo.

Musashi Imperial Graveyard

Taishō's father was born and reared in Kyoto; and although he later lived and died in Tokyo, Meiji's mausoleum is located on the outskirts of Kyoto, near the tombs of his Imperial forebears; but Taishō's grave is in Tokyo, in the Musashi Imperial Graveyard in Hachiōji.
Located within a forest in the western suburbs of Tokyo and named for the ancient Musashi Province, the site contains the mausolea of Emperor Taishō and Emperor Shōwa, as well as those of their wives, Empress Teimei and Empress Kōjun.

Takahito, Prince Mikasa

Prince MikasaPrince TakahitoMikasa
He was the fourth and youngest son of Emperor Taishō (Yoshihito) and Empress Teimei (Sadako) and was their last surviving child.

Taishō

Taishō periodTaishō eraTaishō democracy
Having ruled during the Taishō period, he is known as the "Emperor Taishō".
Taishō era is a period in the history of Japan dating from 30 July 1912 to 25 December 1926, coinciding with the reign of the Emperor Taishō.