Emperor Wen of Sui

Emperor WenYang JianWéndiWenEmperor WendiWen of SuiSui WendiWen EmperorWendiEmperor Wen of Sui China
Emperor Wen of Sui (隋文帝; 21 July 541 – 13 August 604), personal name Yang Jian, Xianbei name Puliuru Jian, nickname Narayana deriving from Buddhist terms, was the founder and first emperor of China's Sui dynasty (581–618 AD).wikipedia
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Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou

Emperor WuYuwen YongWu Di
As a Northern Zhou official, Yang Jian served with apparent distinction during the reigns of Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou and Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou.
His death the next year, however, ended his ambitions of uniting China, and under the reign of his erratic son Emperor Xuan (Yuwen Yun), Northern Zhou itself soon deteriorated and was usurped by Yang Jian in 581.

Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou

Emperor XuanYuwen YunXuan Di
As a Northern Zhou official, Yang Jian served with apparent distinction during the reigns of Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou and Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou. In 573, Emperor Wu took Yang Jian's daughter Yang Lihua to be the wife and crown princess of his son Yuwen Yun the Crown Prince, and further honored Yang Jian.
After his death in 580, the government was taken over by his father-in-law Yang Jian, who soon deposed his son Emperor Jing, ending Northern Zhou and establishing Sui Dynasty.

Dugu Qieluo

Empress DuguDuchess Dugu QieluoDugu Jialuo
(Emperor Fei of Western Wei and the Ming dynasty Hongzhi Emperor were the only two perpetually monogamous Chinese emperors.) Emperor Wen was known for having only two concubines (although he might have had additional concubines not documented by traditional historians), with whom he might not have had sexual relations until after the death in 602 of his wife Empress Dugu, whom he loved and respected deeply.
She was the wife of Emperor Wen, who, on account of his love and respect for her, as well as an oath they made while they were young, did not have any concubines for at least most of their marriage, an extreme rarity among Chinese emperors.

Yuchi Jiong

After defeating the general Yuchi Jiong, who resisted him, he seized the throne for himself, establishing the new Sui Dynasty (as its Emperor Wen).
In 580, believing that the regent Yang Jian had designs on the throne, Yuchi rose against Yang but was soon defeated.

Xianbei

Xianbei languageXianbicolonised by Turkic people
Emperor Wen of Sui (隋文帝; 21 July 541 – 13 August 604), personal name Yang Jian, Xianbei name Puliuru Jian, nickname Narayana deriving from Buddhist terms, was the founder and first emperor of China's Sui dynasty (581–618 AD).
In 581, the Prime Minister of Northern Zhou, Yang Jian, founded the Sui dynasty (581-618).

Göktürks

TujueGöktürkGokturks
At the beginning of his reign, Sui faced the threat of the Göktürks to the north, and neighbored Tibetan tribes to the west, Goguryeo in the northeast, and Champa (Linyi) threatening the south.
With the support of Emperor Wen of Sui, Jami Qayan won the competition.

Emperor Jing of Northern Zhou

Emperor JingYuwen ChanJing Di
In 579, Emperor Xuan passed the throne to his young son Yuwen Chan (by his concubine Consort Zhu Manyue) (as Emperor Jing) and became retired emperor (with the atypical title of "Emperor Tianyuan" (Tianyuan Huangdi), but continued to exercise imperial powers.
After Emperor Xuan's death in 580, the official Yang Jian, the father of Emperor Xuan's wife Yang Lihua, seized power as regent.

Yang Lihua

last empress dowager
In 573, Emperor Wu took Yang Jian's daughter Yang Lihua to be the wife and crown princess of his son Yuwen Yun the Crown Prince, and further honored Yang Jian.
Her husband was Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou (Yuwen Yun), and her father was Yang Jian who later usurped the Northern Zhou throne to become the Emperor Wen of Sui.

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
At the beginning of his reign, Sui faced the threat of the Göktürks to the north, and neighbored Tibetan tribes to the west, Goguryeo in the northeast, and Champa (Linyi) threatening the south.
In 598, Goguryeo made a preemptive attack on Liaoxi, leading Emperor Wen to launch a counterattack by land and sea that ended in disaster for Sui.

Yang Su

He entrusted most of the important governmental matters to his officials Gao Jiong, Yang Su, and Su Wei.
Traditional historians generally believed that he was involved in the suspected murder of Emperor Wen in 604, at the behest of Emperor Wen's son Yang Guang (the later Emperor Yang).

Northern Zhou

Northern Zhou dynastyZhou dynastyfrom China
As a Northern Zhou official, Yang Jian served with apparent distinction during the reigns of Emperor Wu of Northern Zhou and Emperor Xuan of Northern Zhou.
After his death in 580, when he was already nominally retired (Taishang Huang), Xuan's father-in-law Yang Jian took power, and in 581 seized the throne from Emperor Xuan's son Emperor Jing, establishing Sui.

Yang Yong (Sui dynasty)

Yang Yongelder brother
He created his wife Duchess Dugu empress and their oldest son Yang Yong crown prince; he created his brothers and his other sons imperial princes.
He was the oldest son of Emperor Wen and Empress Dugu.

Wei Xiaokuan

However, just 68 days after Yuchi rose in rebellion, the general Wei Xiaokuan defeated Yuchi, and Yuchi committed suicide.
His final campaign, in 580, saw him siding with the regent Yang Jian against the general Yuchi Jiong in Northern Zhou's civil war, allowing Yang to defeat Yuchi and (after Wei's death) take over the throne as Sui Dynasty's Emperor Wen.

Su Wei (politician)

Su Wei
He entrusted most of the important governmental matters to his officials Gao Jiong, Yang Su, and Su Wei.
He first became an important official during the reign of Sui's founder Emperor Wen, and after Emperor Wen's death continued to serve Emperor Wen's son Emperor Yang.

Gao Jiong

He entrusted most of the important governmental matters to his officials Gao Jiong, Yang Su, and Su Wei.
He was a key advisor to Emperor Wen of Sui and instrumental in the campaign against rival the Chen Dynasty, allowing Sui to destroy Chen in 589 and reunify China.

Legalism (Chinese philosophy)

LegalismLegalistChinese Legalism
The Sui Shu records him as having withdrawn his favour from the Confucians, giving it to "the group advocating Xing-Ming and authoritarian government."
Emperor Wen of Sui is recorded as having withdrawn his favour from the Confucians, giving it to "the group advocating Xing-Ming and authoritarian government."

Emperor Yang of Sui

Emperor YangYang GuangYángdi
He also took Emperor Ming's daughter as the wife and princess to his son, Yang Guang the Prince of Jin.
Emperor Yang of Sui (隋煬帝, 569 – 11 April 618), personal name Yang Guang, alternative name Ying, nickname Amo, also known as Emperor Ming during the brief reign of his grandson Yang Tong), was the second son of Emperor Wen of Sui, and the second emperor of China's Sui dynasty.

Empress Xiao (Sui dynasty)

Empress XiaoPrincess XiaoXiao
He also took Emperor Ming's daughter as the wife and princess to his son, Yang Guang the Prince of Jin.
In 582, Emperor Wen of Sui, because Emperor Ming had supported him during Northern Zhou's civil war in 580 against the general Yuchi Jiong, wanted to take one of Emperor Ming's daughters to be the wife of his son Yang Guang the Prince of Jin.

Yang Jun (prince)

Yang Jun
In spring 588, Emperor Wen publicly announced a campaign against Chen, commanded by Yang Guang, another of his sons Yang Jun the Prince of Qin, and Yang Su, with Yang Guang in overall command.
He was a son of Emperor Wen (Yang Jian) and his wife Empress Dugu, who died as a result of an illness caused by poisoning by his jealous wife Princess Cui.

Weinan

Weinan PrefectureWeinan City
Yang Jian's mother Lady Lü gave birth to him at a Buddhist temple in Pingyi (馮翊, in modern Weinan, Shaanxi).

Chen Shubao

Houzhu
Emperor Jing's uncle Xiao Yan the Prince of Anping and Xiao Huan the Prince of Yixing instead believed that Cui was intending to attack the city, and they took the populace of the city and surrendered to the Chen general Chen Huiji, the cousin to Chen's emperor Chen Shubao.
He was taken to the Sui capital Chang'an, where he was treated kindly by Emperor Wen of Sui until his death in 604, during the reign of Emperor Wen's son, Emperor Yang.

Northern and Southern dynasties

Southern and Northern DynastiesSouthern DynastiesNorthern Dynasties
The Southern and Northern Dynasties period was over, and Sui had united China.
The period came to an end with the unification of all of China proper by Emperor Wen of the Sui dynasty.

Xiao Cong

Emperor Jing of Western LiangEmperor JingXiao Jing Di
(After Emperor Ming's death in 585 and succession by his son Emperor Jing of Western Liang, however, Emperor Wen reestablished the post of commandant of Jiangling and again put Western Liang territory under military control.)
In 587, after Emperor Jing's uncle Xiao Yan and brother Xiao Huan, surrendered to Chen Dynasty after suspecting Sui intentions, Emperor Wen of Sui abolished Western Liang, seized the Western Liang territory, and made Emperor Jing one of his officials, ending Western Liang.

Xiao Mohe

Heruo soon defeated and captured the Chen general Xiao Mohe, who was making a final attempt to repel Heruo and Han's forces from Jiankang, and Jiankang fell immediately after.
He later served under Emperor Wen of Sui's son Yang Liang the Prince of Han, and became a major proponent of Yang Liang's rebellion against his brother Emperor Yang of Sui after Emperor Wen's death in 604.

Yang Xiu (Sui dynasty)

Yang Xiu
In anger, He Tuo accused Su Wei of factionalism, and after investigation by Emperor Wen's son Yang Xiu and the official Yu Qingze (ted zhang), Su Wei was removed from office.
He was a son of Emperor Wen and his wife Empress Dugu, and during most of his father's reign was given great control over the modern Sichuan and Chongqing region.