Emperor of Japan

EmperorMonarchJapanese EmperorEmperorsMikadotennōimperialmonarch of JapanEmperors of Japanimperial court
The Emperor of Japan is the head of the Imperial Family and the head of state of Japan.wikipedia
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Constitution of Japan

ConstitutionJapanese Constitution1947 constitution
Under the 1947 constitution, he is defined as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people." Article 65 explicitly vests executive power in the Cabinet, of which the Prime Minister is the leader.
Under its terms, the Emperor of Japan is "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people" and exercises a purely ceremonial role without the possession of sovereignty.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
The Emperor of Japan is the head of the Imperial Family and the head of state of Japan.
From the 12th century until 1868, Japan was ruled by successive feudal military shōguns who ruled in the name of the Emperor.

Head of state

heads of statechief of stateheads of states
The Emperor of Japan is the head of the Imperial Family and the head of state of Japan.
The emperor is defined in the constitution as "the symbol of the State and of the unity of the people" (article 1), and is generally recognized throughout the world as the Japanese head of state.

Emperor

empressemperorsimperial
Currently, the Emperor of Japan is the only head of state in the world with the English title of "Emperor".
The Emperor of Japan is the only currently reigning monarch whose title is translated into English as Emperor.

Emperor Jimmu

Jimmu2600th anniversary660 BC
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.
Emperor Jimmu was the first Emperor of Japan, according to legend.

Chrysanthemum Throne

Imperial ThronethroneImperial succession
He acceded to the Chrysanthemum Throne upon the death of his father, Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito), in 1989.
The Chrysanthemum Throne is the throne of the Emperor of Japan.

2019 Japanese imperial transition

abdicatehis father's abdicationSuccessor to the Chrysanthemum Throne
The Japanese government announced in December 2017 that Akihito will abdicate on 30 April 2019.
Emperor Akihito of Japan is set to abdicate on 30 April 2019, which will make him the first Japanese Emperor to do so in over two centuries.

Enthronement of the Japanese Emperor

enthronemententhronement ceremonyacceded
He acceded to the Chrysanthemum Throne upon the death of his father, Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito), in 1989.
The Japanese enthronement ceremony consists of three main parts.

Shōgun

shogunateshogunBakufu
Since the establishment of the first shogunate in 1199, the Emperors of Japan have rarely taken on a role as supreme battlefield commander, unlike many Western monarchs.
In most of this period, the shōguns were the de facto rulers of the country, although nominally they were appointed by the Emperor as a ceremonial formality.

Amaterasu

Amaterasu-ōmikamiAmaterasu ŌmikamiAmaterasu Omikami
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.
According to the Kojiki and Nihon Shoki in Japanese mythology, the Emperors of Japan are considered to be direct descendants of Amaterasu.

Tokyo Imperial Palace

Imperial PalaceImperial Palace in TokyoImperial Palace Garden
Since the mid-nineteenth century, the Imperial Palace has been called Kyūjō, later Kōkyo, and is on the former site of Edo Castle in the heart of Tokyo (the current capital of Japan).
The Tokyo Imperial Palace is the primary residence of the Emperor of Japan.

Nihon Shoki

Nihongieight emperors without specific legends associated with them
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.
The Nihon Shoki focuses on the merits of the virtuous rulers as well as the errors of the bad rulers.

Meiji Restoration

industrialization of JapanRestorationMeiji
After the Meiji Restoration in 1867, the Emperor was the embodiment of all sovereign power in the realm, as enshrined in the Meiji Constitution of 1889.
Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.

Tokyo

Tokyo, JapanTokyo MetropolisTōkyō
Since the mid-nineteenth century, the Imperial Palace has been called Kyūjō, later Kōkyo, and is on the former site of Edo Castle in the heart of Tokyo (the current capital of Japan).
The urban area houses the seat of the Emperor of Japan, of the Japanese government and of the National Diet.

Japanese imperial family tree

direct descendantdirect descendentfamily tree
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.
The following is a family tree of the Emperors of Japan, from the legendary Emperor Jimmu to the present day.

Meiji Constitution

Constitution of the Empire of JapanconstitutionJapanese law during the Meiji period
After the Meiji Restoration in 1867, the Emperor was the embodiment of all sovereign power in the realm, as enshrined in the Meiji Constitution of 1889.
In theory, the Emperor of Japan was the supreme leader, and the Cabinet, whose Prime Minister would be elected by a Privy Council, were his followers; in practice, the Emperor was head of state but the Prime Minister was the actual head of government.

Kojiki

ancient Japanese mythKojiki-denKōjiki
The historical origins of the Emperors lie in the late Kofun period of the 3rd–7th centuries AD, but according to the traditional account of the Kojiki (finished 712) and Nihon Shoki (finished 720), Japan was founded in 660 BC by Emperor Jimmu, who was said to be a direct descendant of the sun-goddess Amaterasu.
The Nakatsumaki begins with the story of Emperor Jimmu, the first Emperor, and his conquest of Japan, and ends with the 15th Emperor, Emperor Ōjin. The second through ninth emperors' reigns are recorded in a minimum of detail, with only their names, the names of their various descendants, and the place-names of their palaces and tombs listed, and no mention of their achievements. Many of the stories in this volume are mythological, and the allegedly historical information in them is highly suspect. Recent studies support the view that these emperors were invented to push Jimmu's reign further back to the year 660 BC.

Prime Minister of Japan

Prime MinisterJapanese Prime MinisterPrime Ministers
Article 65 explicitly vests executive power in the Cabinet, of which the Prime Minister is the leader.
The Prime Minister is appointed by the Emperor of Japan after being designated by the National Diet and must enjoy the confidence of the House of Representatives to remain in office.

Cabinet of Japan

CabinetJapanese Cabinetcabinet member
Article 65 explicitly vests executive power in the Cabinet, of which the Prime Minister is the leader.
It consists of the Prime Minister, who is appointed by the Emperor after being designated by the National Diet, and up to nineteen other members, called Ministers of State.

Emperor Kanmu

KanmuEmperor Kanmu’sKammu
509 – 571 AD), the 29th emperor, is the first for which contemporary historiography is able to assign verifiable dates; however, the conventionally accepted names and dates of the early emperors were not to be confirmed as "traditional" until the reign of Emperor Kanmu (737–806), the 50th sovereign of the Yamato dynasty.
Emperor Kanmu was the 50th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Emperor Kinmei

Kinmei6th century
The reign of Emperor Kinmei (c.
Emperor Kinmei was the 29th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Imperial House of Japan

YamatoImperial FamilyJapanese imperial family
The Emperor of Japan is the head of the Imperial Family and the head of state of Japan. 509 – 571 AD), the 29th emperor, is the first for which contemporary historiography is able to assign verifiable dates; however, the conventionally accepted names and dates of the early emperors were not to be confirmed as "traditional" until the reign of Emperor Kanmu (737–806), the 50th sovereign of the Yamato dynasty.
The Imperial House of Japan, also referred to as the Imperial Family and the Yamato Dynasty, comprises those members of the extended family of the reigning Emperor of Japan who undertake official and public duties.

Japanese clans

Japanese samurai clanclanJapanese clan
There have been six non-imperial families who have controlled Japanese emperors: the Soga (530s–645), the Fujiwara (850s–1070), the Taira (1159-1180s), the Minamoto (and Kamakura bakufu) (1192–1333), the Ashikaga (1336–1565), and the Tokugawa (1603–1867).
Its emperors and other clan members have no clan name but had been called "the royal clan" if necessary.

The Emperor's Birthday

Emperor's Birthdaythe Emperor's 80th Birthday
The Emperor's Birthday (currently December 23) is a national holiday.
The Emperor's Birthday is a national holiday in the Japanese calendar celebrated on the birthday of the reigning Emperor, which is currently 23 December, as Emperor Akihito was born on that day in 1933.

Minamoto clan

MinamotoGenjiGenji clan
There have been six non-imperial families who have controlled Japanese emperors: the Soga (530s–645), the Fujiwara (850s–1070), the Taira (1159-1180s), the Minamoto (and Kamakura bakufu) (1192–1333), the Ashikaga (1336–1565), and the Tokugawa (1603–1867).
Minamoto was one of the surnames bestowed by the Emperors of Japan upon members of the imperial family who were excluded from the line of succession and demoted into the ranks of the nobility from 1192 to 1333.