The Empire of Japan at its peak in 1942:
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Map of Japan under Allied occupation
 
# Japanese archipelago, placed under the authority of the Supreme Commander of the Allied Powers (de facto United States), effective 1945–1952 (Note: Part of Japanese territories were put under US' administration after 1952 in accordance with Article 3 of San Francisco Peace Treaty: Iwo Jima (till 1968) and Okinawa (till 1972), such arrangement was treaty based, not part of the Allied Occupation)
# Japanese Taiwan and the Spratly Islands, placed under the authority of China
# Karafuto Prefecture and the Kuril Islands, placed under the authority of the Soviet Union
# Japanese Korea south of the 38th parallel north, placed under the authority of the United States Army Military Government in Korea, granted independence in 1948 as South Korea
# Japanese Korea north of the 38th parallel north, placed under the authority of the Soviet Civil Administration, granted independence in 1948 as North Korea
# Kwantung Leased Territory, occupied by the Soviet Union 1945–1955, returned to China in 1955
# South Pacific Mandate, occupied by the United States 1945–1947, converted into the Trust Territory of the Pacific Islands in 1947
The Naval Battle of Hakodate, May 1869; in the foreground, and of the Imperial Japanese Navy
May 1946: The Indian Army 2nd Battalion 5th Royal Gurkha Rifles march through Kure, Hiroshima soon after their arrival in Japan.
The Empire of Japan at its peak in 1942:
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Nihonbashi, Tokyo, in 1946
Prominent members of the Iwakura mission. Left to right: Kido Takayoshi, Yamaguchi Masuka, Iwakura Tomomi, Itō Hirobumi, Ōkubo Toshimichi
Gaetano Faillace's famous photo of Douglas MacArthur and Emperor Hirohito
Emperor Meiji, the 122nd emperor of Japan
The Japanese government releases members of the Japanese Communist Party on October 10, 1945.
Ōura Church, Nagasaki
Hideki Tōjō takes the stand at the Tokyo war crimes tribunal.
Interior of the Japanese Parliament, showing the Prime Minister speaking addressing the House of Peers, 1915
Joseph Dodge meets Finance Minister Hayato Ikeda in 1949
Prince Aritomo Yamagata, who was twice Prime Minister of Japan. He was one of the main architects of the military and political foundations of early modern Japan.
Prime Minister Shigeru Yoshida signs the Treaty of San Francisco, which brought an end to the Allied Occupation of Japan.
Baron Masuda Tarokaja, a member of the House of Peers (Kazoku). His father, Baron Masuda Takashi, was responsible for transforming Mitsui into a zaibatsu.
Allied servicemen visit the Special Comfort Facility Association.
The Tokyo Industrial Exhibition, 1907 (Mitsubishi pavilion and Exhibition halls)
Marunouchi District in 1920, looking towards the Imperial Palace
A 1-yen banknote, 1881
Thomas Blake Glover was a Scottish merchant in Bakumatsu and received Japan's second highest order from Emperor Meiji in recognition of his contributions to Japan's industrialization.
Prince Katsura Tarō, thrice Prime Minister and the Lord Keeper of the Privy Seal of Japan. Katsura commanded the IJA 3rd Division under his mentor, Field Marshal Yamagata Aritomo, during the First Sino-Japanese War.
Map of the Japanese Empire in 1895. This map was issued shortly after the Japanese invasion of Taiwan and is consequently one of the first Japanese maps to include Taiwan as a possession of Imperial Japan.
Marquess Komura Jutaro, 1911. Komura became Minister for Foreign Affairs under the first Katsura administration, and signed the Boxer Protocol on behalf of Japan.
French illustration of a Japanese assault on entrenched Russian troops during the Russo-Japanese War
Japanese riflemen during the Russo-Japanese War
Count Tadasu Hayashi was the resident minister to the United Kingdom. While serving in London from 1900, he worked to successfully conclude the Anglo-Japanese Alliance and signed on behalf of the government of Japan on January 30, 1902.
Port Arthur viewed from the Top of Gold Hill, after its capitulation in 1905. From left are the wrecks of Russian pre-dreadnought battleships Peresvet, Poltava, Retvizan, Pobeda and the protected cruisers Pallada
Emperor Taishō, the 123rd emperor of Japan
Topographic map of the Empire of Japan in November, 1918
Native Micronesian constables of Truk Island, circa 1930. Truk became a possession of the Empire of Japan under a mandate from the League of Nations following Germany's defeat in World War I.
Commanding Officers and Chiefs of Staff of the Allied Military Mission to Siberia, Vladivostok during the Allied Intervention
Groundbreaking ceremony of Ginza Line, the oldest subway line in Asia, 1925. Front row, right to left: Rudolf Briske, Noritsugu Hayakawa, Furuichi Kōi, Ryutaro Nomura.
Count Itagaki Taisuke is credited as being the first Japanese party leader and an important force for liberalism in Meiji Japan.
Count Katō Komei, the 14th Prime Minister of Japan from June 11, 1924, until his death on January 28, 1926
Emperor Shōwa during an Army inspection on January 8, 1938
Tokyo Kaikan was requisitioned as the meeting place for members of the Imperial Rule Assistance Association (Taisei Yokusankai) in the early days.
Japanese Pan-Asian writer Shūmei Ōkawa
Rebel troops assembling at police headquarters during the February 26 Incident
A bank run during the Shōwa financial crisis, March 1927
National Diet Building, 1930
Political map of the Asia-Pacific region, 1939
Japanese troops entering Shenyang, Northeast China during the Mukden Incident, 1931
The Japanese occupation of Peiping (Beijing) in China, on August 13, 1937. Japanese troops are shown passing from Peiping into the Tartar City through Zhengyangmen, the main gate leading onward to the palaces in the Forbidden City.
IJN Special Naval Landing Forces armed with the Type 11 Light Machine Gun during the Battle of Shanghai, 1937
Signing ceremony for the Axis Powers Tripartite Pact
Founding ceremony of the Hakkō ichiu (All the world under one roof) monument in 1940
A map of the Japanese advance from 1937 to 1942
Victorious Japanese troops march through the city center of Singapore following the city's capture in February 1942 (Photo from the Imperial War Museum)
Imperial Japanese Army paratroopers are landing during the Battle of Palembang, February 13, 1942.
A model representing the attack by dive bombers from USS Yorktown (CV-5) and USS Enterprise (CV-6) on the Japanese aircraft carriers, and in the morning of June 4, 1942, during the Battle of Midway
Group of Type 2 Ka-Mi tanks on board of 2nd class transporter of the Imperial Japanese Navy, 1944–1945
The rebuilt battlecruiser sank at her moorings in the naval base of Kure on July 24 during a series of bombings.
The Japanese archipelago and the Korean Peninsula in 1945 (National Geographic)
A drawing depicting a speech in the Imperial Japanese Diet on November 1, 1945, the end of the Second World War. In the foreground there are several Allied soldiers watching the proceedings from the back of the balcony.
From left to right: Marshal Admiral Heihachirō Tōgō (1848–1934), Field Marshal Oku Yasukata (1847–1930), Marshal Admiral Yoshika Inoue (1845–1929), Field Marshal Kageaki Kawamura (1850–1926), at the unveiling ceremony of bronze statue of Field Marshal Iwao Ōyama
Population density map of the Empire of Japan (1920).
Population density map of the Empire of Japan (1940).
War flag of the Imperial Japanese Army
Naval ensign of the Empire of Japan
Flag of the Japanese Emperor

The Occupation of Japan (連合国占領下の日本) was a military occupation of Japan in the years immediately following Japan's defeat in World War II.

- Occupation of Japan

A period of occupation by the Allies followed.

- Empire of Japan

9 related topics

Alpha

The League of Nations assembly, held in Geneva, Switzerland, 1930

World War II

Global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945.

Global war that lasted from 1939 to 1945.

The League of Nations assembly, held in Geneva, Switzerland, 1930
Adolf Hitler at a German Nazi political rally in Nuremberg, August 1933
Benito Mussolini inspecting troops during the Italo-Ethiopian War, 1935
The bombing of Guernica in 1937, during the Spanish Civil War, sparked fears abroad in Europe that the next war would be based on bombing of cities with very high civilian casualties.
Japanese Imperial Army soldiers during the Battle of Shanghai, 1937
Red Army artillery unit during the Battle of Lake Khasan, 1938
Chamberlain, Daladier, Hitler, Mussolini, and Ciano pictured just before signing the Munich Agreement, 29 September 1938
German Foreign Minister Joachim von Ribbentrop (right) and the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, after signing the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact, 23 August 1939
Soldiers of the German Wehrmacht tearing down the border crossing into Poland, 1 September 1939
Soldiers of the Polish Army during the defence of Poland, September 1939
Finnish machine gun nest aimed at Soviet Red Army positions during the Winter War, February 1940
German advance into Belgium and Northern France, 10 May-4 June 1940, swept past the Maginot Line (shown in dark red)
London seen from St. Paul's Cathedral after the German Blitz, 29 December 1940
Soldiers of the British Commonwealth forces from the Australian Army's 9th Division during the Siege of Tobruk; North African Campaign, September 1941
German Panzer III of the Afrika Korps advancing across the North African desert, April-May 1941
European theatre of World War II animation map, 1939–1945 – Red: Western Allies and the Soviet Union after 1941; Green: Soviet Union before 1941; Blue: Axis powers
German soldiers during the invasion of the Soviet Union by the Axis powers, 1941
Soviet civilians leaving destroyed houses after a German bombardment during the Battle of Leningrad, 10 December 1942
Japanese soldiers entering Hong Kong, 8 December 1941
The USS Arizona (BB-39) was a total loss in the Japanese surprise air attack on the American Pacific Fleet at Pearl Harbor, Sunday 7 December 1941.
US President Franklin D. Roosevelt and British PM Winston Churchill seated at the Casablanca Conference, January 1943
Map of Japanese military advances through mid-1942
US Marines during the Guadalcanal Campaign, in the Pacific theatre, 1942
Red Army soldiers on the counterattack during the Battle of Stalingrad, February 1943
American 8th Air Force Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress bombing raid on the Focke-Wulf factory in Germany, 9 October 1943
U.S. Navy SBD-5 scout plane flying patrol over USS Washington (BB-56) and USS Lexington (CV-16) during the Gilbert and Marshall Islands campaign, 1943
Red Army troops in a counter-offensive on German positions at the Battle of Kursk, July 1943
Ruins of the Benedictine monastery, during the Battle of Monte Cassino, Italian Campaign, May 1944
American troops approaching Omaha Beach during the invasion of Normandy on D-Day, 6 June 1944
German SS soldiers from the Dirlewanger Brigade, tasked with suppressing the Warsaw Uprising against Nazi occupation, August 1944
General Douglas MacArthur returns to the Philippines during the Battle of Leyte, 20 October 1944
Yalta Conference held in February 1945, with Winston Churchill, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Joseph Stalin
Ruins of the Reichstag in Berlin, 3 June 1945.
Atomic bombing of Nagasaki on 9 August 1945.
Ruins of Warsaw in 1945, after the deliberate destruction of the city by the occupying German forces
Defendants at the Nuremberg trials, where the Allied forces prosecuted prominent members of the political, military, judicial and economic leadership of Nazi Germany for crimes against humanity
Post-war border changes in Central Europe and creation of the Communist Eastern Bloc
David Ben-Gurion proclaiming the Israeli Declaration of Independence at the Independence Hall, 14 May 1948
World War II deaths
Bodies of Chinese civilians killed by the Imperial Japanese Army during the Nanking Massacre in December 1937
Schutzstaffel (SS) female camp guards removing prisoners' bodies from lorries and carrying them to a mass grave, inside the German Bergen-Belsen concentration camp, 1945
Prisoner identity photograph taken by the German SS of a Polish Catholic girl who died in Auschwitz. Approximately 230,000 children were held prisoner and used in forced labour and Nazi medical experiments.
Polish civilians wearing blindfolds photographed just before their execution by German soldiers in Palmiry forest, 1940
Soviet partisans hanged by the German army. The Russian Academy of Sciences reported in 1995 civilian victims in the Soviet Union at German hands totalled 13.7 million dead, twenty percent of the 68 million persons in the occupied Soviet Union.
B-29 Superfortress strategic bombers on the Boeing assembly line in Wichita, Kansas, 1944
A V-2 rocket launched from a fixed site in Peenemünde, 21 June 1943
Nuclear Gadget being raised to the top of the detonation "shot tower", at Alamogordo Bombing Range; Trinity nuclear test, New Mexico, July 1945

In the wake of the Axis defeat, Germany and Japan were occupied, and war crimes tribunals were conducted against German and Japanese leaders.

From late 1939 to early 1941, in a series of campaigns and treaties, Germany conquered or controlled much of continental Europe, and formed the Axis alliance with Italy and Japan (along with other countries later on).

Potsdam Conference session including Clement Attlee, Ernest Bevin, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov, Joseph Stalin (white uniform), William D. Leahy, Joseph E. Davies, James F. Byrnes, and Harry S. Truman (right)

Potsdam Declaration

Statement that called for the surrender of all Japanese armed forces during World War II.

Statement that called for the surrender of all Japanese armed forces during World War II.

Potsdam Conference session including Clement Attlee, Ernest Bevin, Vyacheslav Mikhailovich Molotov, Joseph Stalin (white uniform), William D. Leahy, Joseph E. Davies, James F. Byrnes, and Harry S. Truman (right)

On July 26, 1945, United States President Harry S. Truman, United Kingdom Prime Minister Winston Churchill, and Chairman of China Chiang Kai-shek issued the document, which outlined the terms of surrender for the Empire of Japan, as agreed upon at the Potsdam Conference.

The occupation of "points in Japanese territory to be designated by the Allies"

Hiroshima

Capital of Hiroshima Prefecture in Japan.

Capital of Hiroshima Prefecture in Japan.

Hiroshima Urban Employment Area
Downtown Hiroshima
Hondōri Shopping Street
Hiroshima Zero Gate
Former Faculty of Science Building No. 1 at Hiroshima University
Satake Memorial Hall at Hiroshima University (in Higashihiroshima City)
Hiroshima Airport
Astram Line
Shukkei-en
Hiroshima Flower Festival 2011
A man making an okonomiyaki at a restaurant in Hiroshima
Edion Stadium Hiroshima
Mazda Stadium, home of Hiroshima Toyo Carp.
Mitaki-dera
Fudoin
Hiroshima Castle
Old Mitsui Bank Hiroshima Branch (1928)
Map of Hiroshima City in the 1930s (Japanese edition)
Old Hiroshima Army Weapon Depot
Hiroshima August 1945
Hiroshima in October 1945, two months after the bombing
Old Teikoku Bank Hiroshima Branch(1945)
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park
alt=Atomic Bomb Dome by night on 8 September 2017|Atomic Bomb Dome by Jan Letzel and modern Hiroshima
Andersen Takaki Bakery
Atomic Bomb Dome by night
Hiroshima City CBD (2005)
Skyline of Hiroshima City from Mount Futaba(2019)
Hiroshima Station (2021)
Around Hondōri Station (2010)
Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park (2010)
Hiroshima Station
Hiroshima Bus Center
A Hiroshima tram, 2015
Hiroden
Hiroshima–Nishi Airport
Port of Hiroshima
Niho JCT
Hiroshima Expressway
Hiroshima City CBD (2016)

The city was a center of military activities during the imperial era, playing significant roles such as in the First Sino-Japanese War, the Russo-Japanese War, and the two world wars.

The public release of film footage of the city following the attack, and some of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission research on the human effects of the attack, were restricted during the occupation of Japan, and much of this information was censored until the signing of the Treaty of San Francisco in 1951, restoring control to the Japanese.

Preamble of the Constitution

Constitution of Japan

Constitution of Japan and the supreme law in the state.

Constitution of Japan and the supreme law in the state.

Preamble of the Constitution
The constitution of Japan was largely drafted by US lawyers in the occupation authority. This image is of a secret memo written by members of the authority on the subject of the new constitution.
The Preamble to the Constitution
The Imperial Signature (upper right) and Seal
The Constitution of Japan signed by Emperor Showa and Ministers of State
Politics under the Post-war Constitution

Written primarily by American civilian officials working under the Allied Occupation of Japan, the constitution replaced the Meiji Constitution of 1890 when it came into effect on 3 May 1947.

The Meiji Constitution was the fundamental law of the Empire of Japan, propagated during the reign of Emperor Meiji ((r.

Preamble of the Constitution

Meiji Constitution

Preamble of the Constitution
Meiji Constitution promulgation by Toyohara Chikanobu
Itō Hirobumi and Emperor Meiji (Servet-i Fünun 25 October 1894 front page)
Schematic overview of the government structure under the Constitution
Memorial in Yokohama

The Constitution of the Empire of Japan (Kyūjitai: 大日本帝國憲法; Shinjitai: 大日本帝国憲法, romanized: Dai-Nippon Teikoku Kenpō), known informally as the Meiji Constitution (明治憲法, Meiji Kenpō), was the constitution of the Empire of Japan which was proclaimed on February 11, 1889, and remained in force between November 29, 1890 and May 2, 1947.

During the American Occupation of Japan the Meiji Constitution was replaced on November 3, 1946, becoming the "Postwar Constitution", which has been in force since May 3, 1947.

Japanese foreign affairs minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signs the Japanese Instrument of Surrender aboard the USS Missouri (BB-63) as General Richard K. Sutherland watches, September 2, 1945.

Surrender of Japan

Announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.

Announced by Japanese Emperor Hirohito on August 15 and formally signed on September 2, 1945, bringing the hostilities of World War II to a close.

Japanese foreign affairs minister Mamoru Shigemitsu signs the Japanese Instrument of Surrender aboard the USS Missouri (BB-63) as General Richard K. Sutherland watches, September 2, 1945.
Representatives of the Empire of Japan stand aboard USS Missouri (BB-63) prior to signing of the Instrument of Surrender.
Allied landings in the Pacific Theatre of operations, August 1942 to August 1945
The rebuilt battlecruiser sank at her moorings in the naval base of Kure on July 24 during a series of bombings.
The Suzuki cabinet in June 1945
As prime minister, Admiral Kantarō Suzuki headed the Japanese government in the final months of the war.
Foreign Minister Shigenori Tōgō
Naotake Satō
A session of the Potsdam Conference – those pictured include Clement Attlee, Ernest Bevin, Vyacheslav Molotov, Joseph Stalin, William D. Leahy, James F. Byrnes, and Harry S. Truman
Atomic bombing of Nagasaki
War Minister Korechika Anami
A leaflet dropped on Japan after the bombing of Hiroshima. The leaflet says, in part: The Japanese people are facing an extremely important autumn. Your military leaders were presented with thirteen articles for surrender by our three-country alliance to put an end to this unprofitable war. This proposal was ignored by your army leaders... [T]he United States has developed an atom bomb, which had not been done by any nation before. It has been determined to employ this frightening bomb. One atom bomb has the destructive power of 2000 B-29s.
Kenji Hatanaka, leader of the coup d'état
The coup collapsed after Shizuichi Tanaka convinced the rebellious officers to go home. Tanaka committed suicide nine days later.
Allied personnel celebrate the Japanese surrender in Paris.
Allied battleships in Sagami Bay, August 28, 1945
MacArthur at surrender ceremony. The flag flown by Perry is visible in the background.
Gen. Umezu signed

On August 28, the occupation of Japan led by the Supreme Commander for the Allied Powers began.

The formal surrender occurred on September 2, 1945, around 9 a.m., Tokyo time, when representatives from the Empire of Japan signed the Japanese Instrument of Surrender in Tokyo Bay aboard USS Missouri.

Marunouchi Headquarters for the Mitsubishi zaibatsu, pre-1923

Zaibatsu

Marunouchi Headquarters for the Mitsubishi zaibatsu, pre-1923
Seizure of the zaibatsu families assets, 1946

Zaibatsu (財閥) is a Japanese term referring to industrial and financial vertically integrated business conglomerates in the Empire of Japan, whose influence and size allowed control over significant parts of the Japanese economy from the Meiji period until the end of World War II.

After World War II they were dissolved by the Allied occupation forces and succeeded by the keiretsu (groups of banks, manufacturers, suppliers, and distributors).

Emperor Shōwa (1928)

Shōwa (1926–1989)

The Shōwa era (昭和) refers to the period of Japanese history corresponding to the reign of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito) from December 25, 1926 until his death on January 7, 1989.

The Shōwa era (昭和) refers to the period of Japanese history corresponding to the reign of Emperor Shōwa (Hirohito) from December 25, 1926 until his death on January 7, 1989.

Emperor Shōwa (1928)
The National Diet Building, where both houses of the National Diet of Japan meet, was completed in early Shōwa era (1936).
Maximum extent of the Japanese colonial empire
Japanese Emperor Hirohito as head of the Imperial General Headquarters on 29 April 1943
A map of the Japanese advance from 1937 to 1942
Hideki Tōjō (right) and Nobusuke Kishi, October 1943
Japanese Emperor Hirohito and U.S. President Ronald Reagan

The pre-1945 and post-war Shōwa periods are almost-completely different states: the pre-1945 Shōwa era (1926–1945) concerns the Empire of Japan, and post-1945 Shōwa era (1945–1989) is the State of Japan.

For the first and only time in its history, Japan was occupied by foreign powers, an American-led occupation which lasted for seven years.

Imperial Rule Assistance Association

Establishment of the Imperial Rule Assistance Association
Imperial Rule Assistance Association cadres, 1940
Celebrations on founding of the IRAA
Imperial Rule Assistance Association election speech, 1942

The Imperial Rule Assistance Association (大政翼贊會/大政翼賛会), or Imperial Aid Association, was the Empire of Japan's ruling organization during much of World War II.

During the Allied occupation of Japan, the American authorities purged thousands of government leaders from public life for having been members of the Association.