Engagement near Carthage

Battle of CarthageCarthageBattle of Carthage (1861)Battle of Carthage (Missouri)Carthage, Missourithe Battle of Carthage
The Engagement near Carthage, also known as the Battle of Carthage, took place at the beginning of the American Civil War on July 5, 1861, near Carthage, Missouri.wikipedia
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Carthage, Missouri

CarthageCarthage †Carthage, MO
The Engagement near Carthage, also known as the Battle of Carthage, took place at the beginning of the American Civil War on July 5, 1861, near Carthage, Missouri.
The Battle of Carthage, fought on July 5, 1861, was a clash between Union troops from St. Louis and Confederate troops led by the pro-Southern Missouri Governor, Claiborne Fox Jackson.

Franz Sigel

SigelGen. Franz SigelGen. Sigel
The experienced Colonel Franz Sigel commanded 1,100 Federal soldiers intent on keeping Missouri within the Union.
He recruited and organized an expedition to southwest Missouri, and subsequently fought the Battle of Carthage, where a force of pro-Confederate Missouri militia handed him a setback in a strategically insignificant fight.

Missouri State Guard

Enrolled Missouri MilitiamilitiaMissouri Volunteer Militia
The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson himself and numbered over 4,000 soldiers led by a hero of Mexico, Sterling Price, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle.
Another victory on July 5 at the Battle of Carthage bought time for Price to begin training and organizing his raw recruits, many of whom had reported for military duty carrying only farm implements or antiquated hunting weapons.

Claiborne Fox Jackson

Claiborne JacksonClaiborne F. JacksonJackson
The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson himself and numbered over 4,000 soldiers led by a hero of Mexico, Sterling Price, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle. Missouri Governor Claiborne F. Jackson was pro-Southern, and the rest of the state was very heavily divided.
At Carthage on July 5, Jackson himself took command of 6,000 State Guardsmen (becoming the second sitting U.S. Governor to lead troops in battle after Isaac Shelby of Kentucky did so during the War of 1812), and drove back a much smaller Union detachment led by Colonel Franz Sigel.

Sterling Price

PriceGeneral Sterling PriceSterling "Pap" Price
The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson himself and numbered over 4,000 soldiers led by a hero of Mexico, Sterling Price, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle.

Joseph O. Shelby

Jo ShelbyJoseph ShelbyJoseph O. "Jo" Shelby
The battle was a strategic victory by the Missouri State Guard in large part owing to new tactics introduced on the battlefield by independent partisan rangers serving with Captain Jo Shelby.
Shelby formed the Lafayette County Mounted Rifles for Missouri State Guard service and was elected the company's captain, leading it into battle at Carthage, Wilson's Creek, and Pea Ridge.

Jasper County, Missouri

Jasper CountyJasperJasper (MO)
The depopulation of mineral-rich Jasper County and the destruction of Carthage by sustained hostilities throughout the war paved the way for Victorian-era resettlement.
The center blue and red stars memorialize the struggle in Jasper County during the Civil War years, including the Battle of Carthage in 1861 and second battle in 1863.

American Civil War

Civil WarU.S. Civil WarUnited States Civil War
The Engagement near Carthage, also known as the Battle of Carthage, took place at the beginning of the American Civil War on July 5, 1861, near Carthage, Missouri.

Union (American Civil War)

UnionUnionistNorth
The experienced Colonel Franz Sigel commanded 1,100 Federal soldiers intent on keeping Missouri within the Union.

List of governors of Missouri

Governor of MissouriGovernorMissouri Governor
The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson himself and numbered over 4,000 soldiers led by a hero of Mexico, Sterling Price, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle.

Mexican–American War

Mexican-American WarMexican WarMexican American War
The Missouri State Guard was commanded by Governor Claiborne F. Jackson himself and numbered over 4,000 soldiers led by a hero of Mexico, Sterling Price, along with 2,000 unarmed troops who did not participate in the battle.

Missouri

MOState of MissouriMissouri, USA
Political views in Missouri were divided before the American Civil War.

Governor

gubernatorialgovernorsMilitary Governor
Missouri Governor Claiborne F. Jackson was pro-Southern, and the rest of the state was very heavily divided.

St. Louis

St. Louis, MissouriSt. Louis, MOSaint Louis, Missouri
St. Louis and its surrounding counties generally sympathized with the Northern states because that region was connected economically with the North.

Fort Sumter

SumterFort SumpterFort Sumter, South Carolina
In April 1861, after the firing on Fort Sumter, President Abraham Lincoln called for troops from all of the states to defeat the Confederacy.

President of the United States

PresidentU.S. PresidentUnited States President
In April 1861, after the firing on Fort Sumter, President Abraham Lincoln called for troops from all of the states to defeat the Confederacy.

Abraham Lincoln

LincolnPresident LincolnPresident Abraham Lincoln
In April 1861, after the firing on Fort Sumter, President Abraham Lincoln called for troops from all of the states to defeat the Confederacy.

St. Louis Arsenal

federal arsenal in St. LouisarsenalFederal Arsenal
Instead, he called up the Missouri State Militia, possibly to seize the St. Louis Arsenal.

Nathaniel Lyon

General LyonBrigadier General Nathaniel LyonCaptain Nathaniel Lyon
If this was his intention, it was thwarted by the newly appointed commander of the arsenal, Captain Nathaniel Lyon of the 2d U. S. Infantry.

2nd Infantry Regiment (United States)

2nd Infantry Regiment2nd U.S. Infantry2nd Infantry
If this was his intention, it was thwarted by the newly appointed commander of the arsenal, Captain Nathaniel Lyon of the 2d U. S. Infantry.

Kansas Territory

KansasTerritory of KansasTerritory
Lyon had previously been stationed in Kansas Territory and had developed well-known abolitionist views.

Abolitionism in the United States

abolitionistabolitionistsabolitionism
Lyon had previously been stationed in Kansas Territory and had developed well-known abolitionist views.

Minutemen (Missouri Secessionist Paramilitaries)

MinutemenMinutemen para-military organizationMinutemen paramilitary organization
Lyon, like many St. Louis Unionists, feared that Governor Jackson would employ the city's secessionist Minutemen paramilitary organization and the local Missouri Volunteer Militia to capture the Arsenal.

Missouri Volunteer Militia

Missouri State MilitiaMissouri Volunteer Militia (MVM)1st Missouri Volunteer Militia
Instead, he called up the Missouri State Militia, possibly to seize the St. Louis Arsenal. Lyon, like many St. Louis Unionists, feared that Governor Jackson would employ the city's secessionist Minutemen paramilitary organization and the local Missouri Volunteer Militia to capture the Arsenal.

Wide Awakes

Wide AwakeWide-Awake" political clubs
Beginning on April 22, 1861, on the orders of President Lincoln, Lyon mustered in four regiments of Federal Missouri Volunteers (mostly former members of Republican Wide Awake marching clubs), issuing them weapons drawn from the Arsenal stocks.