Engines of Creation

Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology1986 discussions of MNT
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K.wikipedia
44 Related Articles

Molecular nanotechnology

nanotechnologyadvanced nanotechnologymolecular
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler with a foreword by Marvin Minsky.
MNT nanofacturing is popularly linked with the idea of swarms of coordinated nanoscale robots working together, a popularization of an early proposal by K. Eric Drexler in his 1986 discussions of MNT, but superseded in 1992.

K. Eric Drexler

Eric DrexlerDrexler Eric Drexler’s
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler with a foreword by Marvin Minsky.
The term "nano-technology" had been coined by the Tokyo Science University professor Norio Taniguchi in 1974 to describe the precision manufacture of materials with nanometer tolerances, and Drexler unknowingly used a related term in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology to describe what later became known as molecular nanotechnology (MNT).

Grey goo

Grey goo scenariogray goonanovirus plague
In the book, Drexler proposes the gray goo scenario—one prediction of what might happen if molecular nanotechnology were used to build uncontrollable self-replicating machines.
The term gray goo was coined by nanotechnology pioneer Eric Drexler in his 1986 book Engines of Creation.

There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom

The book features nanotechnology, which Richard Feynman had discussed in his 1959 speech There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.
K. Eric Drexler later took the Feynman concept of a billion tiny factories and added the idea that they could make more copies of themselves, via computer control instead of control by a human operator, in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology.

Life extension

anti-aginganti-aging medicinelife-extension
Topics also include hypertext as developed by Project Xanadu and life extension.
K. Eric Drexler, one of the founders of nanotechnology, postulated cell repair machines, including ones operating within cells and utilizing as yet hypothetical molecular computers, in his 1986 book Engines of Creation.

Drexler–Smalley debate on molecular nanotechnology

Smalley has engaged in open debate with Drexler
Smalley has engaged in open debate with Drexler, attacking the views presented for what he considered both the dubious nature of the science behind them, and the misleading effect on the public's view of nanotechnology.
Drexler went on to publish two books on nanotechnology: Engines of Creation in 1986, which was intended for the public, and the technical work Nanosystems in 1992.

Marvin Minsky

Minsky Minsky, Marvinartificial intelligence
Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology is a 1986 molecular nanotechnology book written by K. Eric Drexler with a foreword by Marvin Minsky.

Richard Feynman

FeynmanRichard P. FeynmanFeynman, Richard
The book features nanotechnology, which Richard Feynman had discussed in his 1959 speech There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom.

Project Xanadu

XanaduXanadu computer systemXanadu Project
Topics also include hypertext as developed by Project Xanadu and life extension.

Malthusianism

Malthusianneo-MalthusianMalthusians
Drexler takes a Malthusian view of exponential growth within limits to growth.

Exponential growth

exponentiallyexponentialgrow exponentially
Drexler takes a Malthusian view of exponential growth within limits to growth.

Malthusian catastrophe

MalthusianMalthusian Trapconsequences
Drexler takes a Malthusian view of exponential growth within limits to growth.

Space advocacy

space advocatesspace activistspace advocate
He also promotes space advocacy arguing that, because the universe is essentially infinite, life can escape the limits to growth defined by Earth.

Fermi paradox

Fermi's paradoxconsiderable speculationFermi's famous paradox
Drexler supports a form of the Fermi paradox, arguing that as there is no evidence of alien civilizations, "Thus for now, and perhaps forever, we can make plans for our future without concern for limits imposed by other civilizations."

Productive nanosystems

nanosystemsNanosystems: Molecular Machinery, Manufacturing, and Computation
Nanosystems addresses chemical, thermodynamic, and other constraints on nanotechnology and manufacturing.

Richard Smalley

Richard E. SmalleyRick SmalleySmalley
Scientists such as Nobel Laureate Richard Smalley and renowned chemist George M. Whitesides have been particularly critical.

George M. Whitesides

George WhitesidesGeorge McClelland WhitesidesWhitesides
Scientists such as Nobel Laureate Richard Smalley and renowned chemist George M. Whitesides have been particularly critical.

History of nanotechnology

21st Centuryearlier usageTaniguchi's "nano-technology
The emergence of nanotechnology in the 1980s was caused by the convergence of experimental advances such as the invention of the scanning tunneling microscope in 1981 and the discovery of fullerenes in 1985, with the elucidation and popularization of a conceptual framework for the goals of nanotechnology beginning with the 1986 publication of the book Engines of Creation.

Nanotechnology in fiction

nanobotsnanomorphnanotechnology
K. Eric Drexler's 1986 book Engines of Creation introduced the general public to the concept of nanotechnology.

Self-replicating machine

self-replicatingself-replicating machinesself-replicating robots
The concept of self-replicating machines has been advanced and examined by Homer Jacobsen, Edward F. Moore, Freeman Dyson, John von Neumann and in more recent times by K. Eric Drexler in his book on nanotechnology, Engines of Creation (coining the term clanking replicator for such machines) and by Robert Freitas and Ralph Merkle in their review Kinematic Self-Replicating Machines which provided the first comprehensive analysis of the entire replicator design space.

Transhumanism

transhumanisttranshumaniststranshuman
In 1986, Eric Drexler published Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which discussed the prospects for nanotechnology and molecular assemblers, and founded the Foresight Institute.

Molecular engineering

Biomolecularmolecular engineerBiomolecular engineering
In spite of the early introduction of these concepts, it was not until the mid-1980s with the publication of Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology by Drexler that the modern concepts of nano and molecular-scale science began to grow in the public consciousness.

The Diamond Age

The Diamond Age, or A Young Lady's Illustrated PrimerThe Diamond Age: Or, A Young Lady's Illustrated PrimerThe Diamond Age: or A Young Lady's Illustrated Primer
The Diamond Age depicts a near-future world revolutionised by advances in nanotechnology, much as Eric Drexler envisioned it in his nonfiction book Engines of Creation (1986).

Nanotechnology

nanosciencenanotechnologiesnanotech
Inspired by Feynman's concepts, K. Eric Drexler used the term "nanotechnology" in his 1986 book Engines of Creation: The Coming Era of Nanotechnology, which proposed the idea of a nanoscale "assembler" which would be able to build a copy of itself and of other items of arbitrary complexity with atomic control.

Foresight Institute

Foresight Institute's Foresight Exchange
Drexler's book, Engines of Creation, was one of the institute's founding documents.