England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENGBritishEnglishmanAngloEnglish-bornEnglishmenUKBritain
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
121,265 Related Articles

English Channel

Channelthe Channelcross-channel
England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south.
The English Channel (la Manche, "The Sleeve"; Ärmelkanal, "Sleeve Channel"; Mor Breizh, "Sea of Brittany"; Mor Bretannek, "British Sea"; Het Kanaal, "The Channel"), also called simply the Channel, is the body of water that separates southern England from northern France and links the southern part of the North Sea to the Atlantic Ocean.

Wales

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿WelshWAL
It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west.
It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
It shares land borders with Scotland to the north and Wales to the west.
It shares a border with England to the south, and is otherwise surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to the east and the North Channel and Irish Sea to the south-west.

North Sea

Norththe North SeaNorthern Sea
England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south.
The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between the United Kingdom (particularly England and Scotland), Denmark, Norway, Sweden, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France.

List of islands of England

islands of Englandover 100 smaller islandslargest and second-most populous
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.
This is a list of islands of England (excluding the mainland which is itself a part of the island of Great Britain), as well as a table of the largest English islands by area and by population.

Isles of Scilly

ScillyScilly IslesGovernor of Scilly
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.
One of the islands, St Agnes, is the most southerly point in both England and the United Kingdom, being over 4 mi further south than the most southerly point of the British mainland at Lizard Point.

Anglican Communion

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations.
Founded in 1867 in London, England, the communion currently has 85 million members within the Church of England and other national and regional churches in full communion.

Dartmoor

Dartmoor National ParkDartmoor, Englandmoorland
However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills).
Dartmoor is a moor in southern Devon, England.

The Midlands

MidlandsEnglish MidlandsMidland
England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.
The Midlands is an area of central England that borders the South East, South West, North West, East of England and Yorkshire and the Humber.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The name "England" is derived from the Old English name Englaland, which means "land of the Angles". The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc, ), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.
membership = England

Ecclesiastical History of the English People

Ecclesiastical HistoryHistoria EcclesiasticaThe Ecclesiastical History of the English People
The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite and Celtic Christianity.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Another romantic name for England is Loegria, related to the Welsh word for England, Lloegr, and made popular by its use in Arthurian legend.
It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).

Bede

Venerable BedeThe Venerable BedeSaint Bede
The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
Bede (Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Bēda Venerābilis), was an English Benedictine monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles (contemporarily Monkwearmouth–Jarrow Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England).

Roman Britain

RomanBritainBritannia
The Romans invaded Britain in 43 AD during the reign of Emperor Claudius, subsequently conquering much of Britain, and the area was incorporated into the Roman Empire as Britannia province.
It comprised almost all of England and Wales and, for a short period, southern Scotland.

Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain

SaxonAnglo-Saxon settlementAnglo-Saxon
The nature and progression of the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain is consequently subject to considerable disagreement.
The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain describes the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England from Romano-British to Germanic.

Danelaw

DanesDanishAnglo-Danish
Wessex under Alfred the Great was left as the only surviving English kingdom, and under his successors, it steadily expanded at the expense of the kingdoms of the Danelaw.
The Danelaw (, also known as the Danelagh; Dena lagu; Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons.

Kingdom of Kent

KentKentishKing of Kent
During the settlement period the lands ruled by the incomers seem to have been fragmented into numerous tribal territories, but by the 7th century, when substantial evidence of the situation again becomes available, these had coalesced into roughly a dozen kingdoms including Northumbria, Mercia, Wessex, East Anglia, Essex, Kent and Sussex.
The Kingdom of the Kentish (Cantaware Rīce; Regnum Cantuariorum), today referred to as the Kingdom of Kent, was an early medieval kingdom in what is now South East England.

Church of England

AnglicanChurchC of E
Henry VIII broke from communion with the Catholic Church, over issues relating to his divorce, under the Acts of Supremacy in 1534 which proclaimed the monarch head of the Church of England.
The Church of England (C of E) is the Established Church of England.

Alfred the Great

King AlfredAlfredKing Alfred the Great
Wessex under Alfred the Great was left as the only surviving English kingdom, and under his successors, it steadily expanded at the expense of the kingdoms of the Danelaw.
Alfred successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and by the time of his death had become the dominant ruler in England.

Eboracum

YorkRoman YorkEbor:
In the 3rd century, Emperor Septimius Severus died at Eboracum (now York), where Constantine was subsequently proclaimed emperor.
The site remained occupied after the decline of the Roman Empire and ultimately evolved into the present-day city York, occupying the same site in North Yorkshire, England.

Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham

Lord Howard of EffinghamCharles HowardCharles Howard, 2nd Baron Howard of Effingham
The plan was thwarted by bad coordination, stormy weather and successful harrying attacks by an English fleet under Lord Howard of Effingham.
Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham, 2nd Baron Howard of Effingham (1536 – 14 December 1624), known as Howard of Effingham, was an English statesman and Lord High Admiral under Elizabeth I and James I.

Battle of Bosworth Field

Battle of BosworthBosworthBosworth Field
Eventually it led to the Yorkists losing the throne entirely to a Welsh noble family the Tudors, a branch of the Lancastrians headed by Henry Tudor who invaded with Welsh and Breton mercenaries, gaining victory at the Battle of Bosworth Field where the Yorkist king Richard III was killed.
The Battle of Bosworth Field (or Battle of Bosworth) was the last significant battle of the Wars of the Roses, the civil war between the Houses of Lancaster and York that extended across England in the latter half of the 15th century.

Manchester

Manchester, EnglandMancunianCity of Manchester
During the Industrial Revolution, many workers moved from England's countryside to new and expanding urban industrial areas to work in factories, for instance at Birmingham and Manchester, dubbed "Workshop of the World" and "Warehouse City" respectively.
Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough in Greater Manchester, England, with a population of 545,500 as of 2017.