England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENGBritishEnglishmanAngloEnglish-bornEnglishmenEngland, UKEngland, United Kingdom
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.wikipedia
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Wales

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿WelshWAL
It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north.
It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south.

Scotland

Scottish🏴󠁧󠁢󠁳󠁣󠁴󠁿Scots
It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north.
It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

North Sea

Norththe North SeaNorthern Sea
England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south.
The North Sea is a marginal sea of the Atlantic Ocean located between Great Britain (particularly England and Scotland), Denmark, Norway, Germany, the Netherlands, Belgium and France.

List of islands of England

Islands of England16th most populated islanda number of small islands
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.
This is a list of islands of England (excluding the mainland which is itself a part of the island of Great Britain), as well as a table of the largest English islands by area and by population.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.
The United Kingdom consists of four constituent countries: England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland.

Anglican Communion

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations.
Founded in 1867 in London, England, the communion currently has 85 million members within the Church of England and other national and regional churches in full communion.

Irish Sea

IrishEast Irish Sea Basinsea
The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest.
The countries that are on its shoreline are, Scotland on the north, England on the east, Wales on the southeast, Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland on the west.

London

London, EnglandLondon, United KingdomLondon, UK
The capital is London, which has the largest metropolitan area in both the United Kingdom and the European Union.
London is the capital and largest city of England and the United Kingdom.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
The English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of many other countries around the world – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations.
It is named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to the area of Great Britain that later took their name, as England.

Dartmoor

Dartmoor National ParkDartmoor wildlifeDartmoor, England
However, there is upland and mountainous terrain in the north (for example, the Lake District and Pennines) and in the west (for example, Dartmoor and the Shropshire Hills).
Dartmoor is an upland area in southern Devon, England.

Midlands

English Midlandsthe MidlandsMidland
England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.
The Midlands is the central part of England.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.
Most of England, Scotland, and Wales are on the island.

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
The name "England" is derived from the Old English name Englaland, which means "land of the Angles". The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc, ), or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages.

Ecclesiastical History of the English People

Historia ecclesiastica gentis AnglorumEcclesiastical HistoryHistoria Ecclesiastica
The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
The Ecclesiastical History of the English People (Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum), written by the Venerable Bede in about AD 731, is a history of the Christian Churches in England, and of England generally; its main focus is on the conflict between the pre-Schism Roman Rite and Celtic Christianity.

Kingdom of England

EnglandEnglishAnglo
The Kingdom of England – which after 1535 included Wales – ceased being a separate sovereign state on 1 May 1707, when the Acts of Union put into effect the terms agreed in the Treaty of Union the previous year, resulting in a political union with the Kingdom of Scotland to create the Kingdom of Great Britain.
In 1016, the kingdom became part of the North Sea Empire of Cnut the Great, a personal union between England, Denmark and Norway.

Bede

Venerable BedeSaint BedeThe Venerable Bede
The earliest recorded use of the term, as "Engla londe", is in the late-ninth-century translation into Old English of Bede's Ecclesiastical History of the English People.
Bede (Bǣda, Bēda; 672/3 – 26 May 735), also known as Saint Bede, Venerable Bede, and Bede the Venerable (Bēda Venerābilis), was an English Benedictine monk at the monastery of St. Peter and its companion monastery of St. Paul in the Kingdom of Northumbria of the Angles (contemporarily Monkwearmouth–Jarrow Abbey in Tyne and Wear, England).

Welsh language

WelshWelsh-languageWelsh-speaking
Another romantic name for England is Loegria, related to the Welsh word for England, Lloegr, and made popular by its use in Arthurian legend.
It is spoken natively in Wales, by some in England, and in Y Wladfa (the Welsh colony in Chubut Province, Argentina).

Roman Britain

RomanBritainBritannia
The Romans invaded Britain in 43 AD during the reign of Emperor Claudius, subsequently conquering much of Britain, and the area was incorporated into the Roman Empire as Britannia province.
It comprised almost the whole of England and Wales and, for a short period, southern Scotland.

York

City of YorkYork, EnglandYork, North Yorkshire
In the 3rd century, Emperor Septimius Severus died at Eboracum (now York), where Constantine was subsequently proclaimed emperor.
York is a city and unitary authority area in North Yorkshire, England, the population of the council area which includes nearby villages was 208,200 as of 2017 and the population of the Urban area was 153,717 at the 2011 census.

Yorkshire

Yorkshire, EnglandCounty of YorkYorkshireman
England's population of over 55 million comprises 84% of the population of the United Kingdom, largely concentrated around London, the South East, and conurbations in the Midlands, the North West, the North East, and Yorkshire, which each developed as major industrial regions during the 19th century.
Norse monarchy controlled varying amounts of Northumbria from 875 to 954, however the area was invaded and conquered for short periods by England between 927 and 954 before eventually being annexed into England in 954.

Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain

Anglo-Saxon invasion of BritainSaxonAnglo-Saxon settlement
The nature and progression of the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain is consequently subject to considerable disagreement.
The Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain is the process which changed the language and culture of most of what became England from Romano-British to Germanic.

Saxons

SaxonSassenachSaxon people
How and why a term derived from the name of a tribe that was less significant than others, such as the Saxons, came to be used for the entire country and its people is not known, but it seems this is related to the custom of calling the Germanic people in Britain Angli Saxones or English Saxons to distinguish them from continental Saxons (Eald-Seaxe) of Old Saxony between the Weser and Eider rivers in Northern Germany.
The seax has a lasting symbolic impact in the English counties of Essex and Middlesex, both of which feature three seaxes in their ceremonial emblem.

Danelaw

DanesAnglo-DanishDanish
Wessex under Alfred the Great was left as the only surviving English kingdom, and under his successors, it steadily expanded at the expense of the kingdoms of the Danelaw.
The Danelaw (, also known as the Danelagh; Dena lagu; Danelagen), as recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, is a historical name given to the part of England in which the laws of the Danes held sway and dominated those of the Anglo-Saxons.

Kingdom of Kent

KentKentishking of Kent
During the settlement period the lands ruled by the incomers seem to have been fragmented into numerous tribal territories, but by the 7th century, when substantial evidence of the situation again becomes available, these had coalesced into roughly a dozen kingdoms including Northumbria, Mercia, Wessex, East Anglia, Essex, Kent and Sussex.
The Kingdom of the Kentish (Cantaware Rīce; Regnum Cantuariorum), today referred to as the Kingdom of Kent, was an early medieval kingdom in what is now South East England.

Kingdom of Ireland

IrelandIrishCrown
In 1801, Great Britain was united with the Kingdom of Ireland (through another Act of Union) to become the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
The territory of the Kingdom had formerly been a lordship ruled by the kings of England, founded in 1177 after the Anglo-Norman invasion of Ireland.