English articles

articlesthearticledefinite articleindefinite articleanAn" and "aEnglish indefinite articleprovection (juncture loss)some'' and ''any
Articles in the English language are the definite article the and the indefinite articles a and an.wikipedia
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Zero-marking in English

zero article
For more cases where no article is used, see Zero article in English.
The most common types of zero-marking in English involve zero articles, zero relative pronouns, and zero subordinating conjunctions.

English grammar

Englishgrammarthere
The rules of English grammar require that in most cases a noun, or more generally a noun phrase, must be "completed" with a determiner to clarify what the referent of the noun phrase is. The most common determiners are the articles the and a(n), which specify the presence or absence of definiteness of the noun.
They include the articles the, a[n], certain demonstrative and interrogative words such as this, that, and which, possessives such as my and whose (the role of determiner can also be played by noun possessive forms such as John's and the girl's), various quantifying words like all, some, many, various, and numerals (one, two, etc.).

Article (grammar)

definite articlearticlearticles
Articles in the English language are the definite article the and the indefinite articles a and an.
"An" and "a" are modern forms of the Old English "an", which in Anglian dialects was the number "one" (compare "on" in Saxon dialects) and survived into Modern Scots as the number "owan".

Noun phrase

noun phrasesNPnominal phrase
In some noun phrases, no article is used.
(Situations in which this is possible depend on the rules of the language in question; for English, see English articles.)

Newt

newtseftGreat Crested, Smooth and Palmate newts
For example, a newt was once an ewt (earlier euft and eft), a nickname was once an eke-name, where eke means "extra" (as in eke out meaning "add to"), and in the other direction, a napron (meaning a little tablecloth, related to the word napkin) became an apron, and a naddre became an adder.
The initial 'n' was added from the indefinite article 'an' by provection (juncture loss) ("an eft" -> "a n'eft" -> ...) by the early 15th century.

English determiners

determinerdeterminers
Other possible determiners include words like this, my, each and many – see English determiners. The existential determinative (or determiner) some is sometimes used as a functional equivalent of a(n) with plural and uncountable nouns (also called a partitive).
The most common of these are the definite and indefinite articles, the and a(n).

Stress and vowel reduction in English

weak formReduced vowelsreduction
Both a and an are usually pronounced with a schwa:, . However, when stressed (which is rare in ordinary speech), they are normally pronounced respectively as (to rhyme with day) and (to rhyme with pan). See Weak and strong forms in English.
This is particularly true of the English articles the, a, an, whose strong forms are used within normal sentences only on the rare occasions when definiteness or indefiniteness is being emphasized: ''Did you find the cat?

Partitive

partitive case
The existential determinative (or determiner) some is sometimes used as a functional equivalent of a(n) with plural and uncountable nouns (also called a partitive).
English articles

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
Articles in the English language are the definite article the and the indefinite articles a and an.

Referent

referentsco-referreference
Use of the definite article implies that the speaker assumes the listener knows the identity of the noun's referent (because it is obvious, because it is common knowledge, or because it was mentioned in the same sentence or an earlier sentence).

Noun

nounssubstantiveabstract noun
The rules of English grammar require that in most cases a noun, or more generally a noun phrase, must be "completed" with a determiner to clarify what the referent of the noun phrase is. The most common determiners are the articles the and a(n), which specify the presence or absence of definiteness of the noun.

Determiner

determinersdefinite determinerdemonstrative determiners
The rules of English grammar require that in most cases a noun, or more generally a noun phrase, must be "completed" with a determiner to clarify what the referent of the noun phrase is. The most common determiners are the articles the and a(n), which specify the presence or absence of definiteness of the noun.

Definiteness

definiteindefinitedef.
The rules of English grammar require that in most cases a noun, or more generally a noun phrase, must be "completed" with a determiner to clarify what the referent of the noun phrase is. The most common determiners are the articles the and a(n), which specify the presence or absence of definiteness of the noun.

Consonant

consonantsCconson.
The indefinite article a (before a consonant sound) or an (before a vowel sound) is used only with singular, countable nouns.

Vowel

vowelsvowel heightV
The indefinite article a (before a consonant sound) or an (before a vowel sound) is used only with singular, countable nouns.

Grammatical number

numbersingularnumbers
The indefinite article a (before a consonant sound) or an (before a vowel sound) is used only with singular, countable nouns.

Count noun

countablecountcountable noun
The indefinite article a (before a consonant sound) or an (before a vowel sound) is used only with singular, countable nouns.

Headline

headlinesnewspaper headlinesubheading
If it is required to be concise, e.g. in headlines, signs, labels, and notes, articles are often omitted along with certain other function words.

Function word

grammatical wordfunctionalfunction
If it is required to be concise, e.g. in headlines, signs, labels, and notes, articles are often omitted along with certain other function words.

Plural

pl.plplurals
with generic nouns (plural or uncountable): cars have accelerators, happiness is contagious, referring to cars in general and happiness in general (compare the happiness I felt yesterday, specifying particular happiness);

Proper noun

proper namecommon nounproper nouns
with many proper names: John, France, London, etc.

Clause

clausesfinite clauseclausal
preceding noun phrases consisting of a clause or infinitive phrase (what you've done is very good, to surrender is to die).

Infinitive

to''-infinitivebare infinitiveinfinitival
preceding noun phrases consisting of a clause or infinitive phrase (what you've done is very good, to surrender is to die).

Old English

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
Barred thorn: the earliest abbreviation, it is used in manuscripts in the Old English language. It is the letter þ, with a bold horizontal stroke through the ascender, and it represents the word þæt, meaning "the" or "that" (neuter nom. / acc.)

Nominative case

nominativenom.NOM
Barred thorn: the earliest abbreviation, it is used in manuscripts in the Old English language. It is the letter þ, with a bold horizontal stroke through the ascender, and it represents the word þæt, meaning "the" or "that" (neuter nom. / acc.)