English country house

country housestately homecountry housescountry seatseatstately homesmansioncountry estatecountry mansioncountry
An English country house is a large house or mansion in the English countryside.wikipedia
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Townhouse (Great Britain)

townhousetown housetownhouses
Such houses were often owned by individuals who also owned a town house.
In British usage, the term townhouse originally refers to the town or city residence, in practice normally in London, of a member of the nobility or gentry, as opposed to their country seat, generally known as a country house or, colloquially, for the larger ones, stately home.

Destruction of country houses in 20th-century Britain

Britain's lost housescountry houses were being demolishedmany other British country houses
Increased taxation and the effects of World War I led to the demolition of hundreds of houses; those that remained had to adapt to survive.
The destruction of country houses in 20th-century Britain was a phenomenon brought about by a change in social conditions during which a large number of country houses of varying architectural merit were demolished by their owners.

Highclere Castle

HighclerecastleHighclere Park
If fortified, it is called a castle, but not all buildings with the name "castle" are fortified (for example Highclere Castle).
Highclere Castle is a country house in the Jacobethan style by the architect Charles Barry, with a park designed by Capability Brown.

Schloss

SchlösserCastleManor house
While a château or a schloss can be a fortified or unfortified building, a country house, similar to an Ansitz, is usually unfortified.
Schloss (pl. Schlösser), formerly written Schloß, is the German term for a building similar to a château, palace, or manor house; or what in the United Kingdom would be known as a stately home or country house.

Château

chateauchâteauxchateaux
While a château or a schloss can be a fortified or unfortified building, a country house, similar to an Ansitz, is usually unfortified.
Most French châteaux are "palaces" or "country houses" and not "castles", and for these the English word "chateau" is appropriate.

Kedleston Hall

KedlestonCurzonCurzon family
In England, the terms "country house" and "stately home" are sometimes used vaguely and interchangeably; however, many country houses such as Ascott in Buckinghamshire were deliberately designed not to be stately, and to harmonise with the landscape, while some of the great houses such as Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall were built as "power houses" to dominate the landscape, and were most certainly intended to be "stately" and impressive. Really large unfortified or barely fortified houses began to take over from the traditional castles of the crown and magnates during the Tudor period, with vast houses such as Hampton Court Palace and Burghley House, and continued until the 18th century with houses such as Castle Howard, Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall.
Kedleston Hall is an English country house in Kedleston, Derbyshire, approximately four miles north-west of Derby, and is the seat of the Curzon family whose name originates in Notre-Dame-de-Courson in Normandy.

Holkham Hall

Holkham EstateHolkham
In England, the terms "country house" and "stately home" are sometimes used vaguely and interchangeably; however, many country houses such as Ascott in Buckinghamshire were deliberately designed not to be stately, and to harmonise with the landscape, while some of the great houses such as Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall were built as "power houses" to dominate the landscape, and were most certainly intended to be "stately" and impressive. Really large unfortified or barely fortified houses began to take over from the traditional castles of the crown and magnates during the Tudor period, with vast houses such as Hampton Court Palace and Burghley House, and continued until the 18th century with houses such as Castle Howard, Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall.
Holkham Hall ( or ) is an 18th-century country house located adjacent to the village of Holkham, Norfolk, England.

Hatfield House

HatfieldHatfield Great ParkHatfield Park
In his book Historic Houses: Conversations in Stately Homes, the author and journalist Robert Harling documents nineteen "stately homes"; these range in size from the vast Blenheim palace to the minuscule Ebberston Hall, and in architecture from the Jacobean Renaissance of Hatfield House to the eccentricities of Sezincote. Burghley House, Longleat House, and Hatfield House are among the best known examples of the showy prodigy house, often built with the intention of attracting the monarch to visit.
Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England.

Ascott House

AscottAscott ParkAscott Park, Ascott
In England, the terms "country house" and "stately home" are sometimes used vaguely and interchangeably; however, many country houses such as Ascott in Buckinghamshire were deliberately designed not to be stately, and to harmonise with the landscape, while some of the great houses such as Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall were built as "power houses" to dominate the landscape, and were most certainly intended to be "stately" and impressive.
Baron Mayer gave the house at Ascott to his nephew Leopold de Rothschild, who transformed it over the following decades into the substantial, but informal, country house it is today.

Landed gentry

landownergentrylanded
However, the term also encompasses houses that were, and often still are, the full-time residence for the landed gentry that ruled rural Britain until the Reform Act 1832.
A newly rich man who wished his family to join the gentry (and they nearly all did so wish), was expected not only to buy a country house and estate, but also to sever all financial ties with the business which had made him wealthy in order to cleanse his family of the "taint of trade".

Woburn Abbey

WoburnWoburn EstateWoburn Park
Woburn Abbey, Forde Abbey and many other mansions with abbey or priory in their name became private houses during this period.
Woburn Abbey occupying the east of the village of Woburn, Bedfordshire, England, is a country house, the family seat of the Duke of Bedford.

Burghley House

BurghleyBurghley ParkBurghley Estate
Burghley House, Longleat House, and Hatfield House are among the best known examples of the showy prodigy house, often built with the intention of attracting the monarch to visit. Really large unfortified or barely fortified houses began to take over from the traditional castles of the crown and magnates during the Tudor period, with vast houses such as Hampton Court Palace and Burghley House, and continued until the 18th century with houses such as Castle Howard, Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall.
Burghley House is a grand sixteenth-century country house in the civil parishes of St Martin's Without and Barnack in the Peterborough unitary authority of the English county of Cambridgeshire, but adjoining Stamford in Lincolnshire.

Longleat

Longleat HouseLongleat EstateLNG
Burghley House, Longleat House, and Hatfield House are among the best known examples of the showy prodigy house, often built with the intention of attracting the monarch to visit.
Longleat is an English stately home and the seat of the Marquesses of Bath.

Prodigy house

prodigy housesprodigy expansion
Burghley House, Longleat House, and Hatfield House are among the best known examples of the showy prodigy house, often built with the intention of attracting the monarch to visit.
Prodigy house is a term for large and showy English country houses built by courtiers and other wealthy families, either "noble palaces of an awesome scale" or "proud, ambitious heaps" according to taste.

Castle

castlesmedieval castlefortification
Other terms used in the names of houses to describe their origin or importance include palace, castle, court, hall, mansion, park, house, manor, and place. Really large unfortified or barely fortified houses began to take over from the traditional castles of the crown and magnates during the Tudor period, with vast houses such as Hampton Court Palace and Burghley House, and continued until the 18th century with houses such as Castle Howard, Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall.
Although castles still provided protection from low levels of violence in later periods, eventually they were succeeded by country houses as high status residences.

Chatsworth House

ChatsworthChatsworth EstateChatsworth House estate
Some of the best known of England's country houses were built by one architect at one particular time: Montacute House, Chatsworth House, and Blenheim Palace are examples.
Chatsworth House is a stately home in Derbyshire, England, in the Derbyshire Dales 3.5 mi northeast of Bakewell and 9 mi west of Chesterfield . The seat of the Duke of Devonshire, it has been home to the Cavendish family since 1549.

Blenheim Palace

BlenheimBlenheim EstateBlenheim Great Park
Some of the best known of England's country houses were built by one architect at one particular time: Montacute House, Chatsworth House, and Blenheim Palace are examples.
Blenheim Palace (pronounced ) is a monumental country house in Blenheim, Oxfordshire, England.

Rousham House

RoushamDormer family
The fashionable William Kent redesigned Rousham House only to have it quickly and drastically altered to provide space for the owner's twelve children.
Rousham House (also known as Rousham Park) is a country house at Rousham in Oxfordshire, England.

Wilton House

Wilton
Wilton House, one of England's grandest houses, is in a remarkably similar vein; although, while the Drydens, mere squires, at Canons Ashby employed a local architect, at Wilton the mighty Earls of Pembroke employed the finest architects of the day: first Holbein, 150 years later Inigo Jones, and then Wyatt followed by Chambers.
Wilton House is an English country house at Wilton near Salisbury in Wiltshire.

Townhouse

town housetownhousestown houses
While the latter two are ducal palaces, Montacute, although built by a Master of the Rolls to Queen Elizabeth I, was occupied for the next 400 years by his descendants, who were gentry without a London townhouse, rather than aristocracy.
In British usage, the term originally referred to the city residence (normally in London) of someone whose main or largest residence was a country house.

Felicia Hemans

Felicia Dorothea HemansHemansFelicia D. Hemans
As a description of a country house, the term was first used in a poem by Felicia Hemans, The Homes of England, originally published in Blackwood's Magazine in 1827.
Hemans's poem The Homes of England (1827) is the origin of the phrase stately home, referring to an English country house.

Castle Howard

Castle Howard EstatesHenderskelfeHenderskelfe Castle
Really large unfortified or barely fortified houses began to take over from the traditional castles of the crown and magnates during the Tudor period, with vast houses such as Hampton Court Palace and Burghley House, and continued until the 18th century with houses such as Castle Howard, Kedleston Hall and Holkham Hall.
Castle Howard is a stately home in North Yorkshire, England, 15 mi north of York.

Estate (land)

estateestatescountry estate
The country house, however, was not just an oasis of pleasure for a fortunate few; it was the centre of its own world, providing employment to hundreds of people in the vicinity of its estate.
Historically, an estate comprises the houses, outbuildings, supporting farmland, and woods that surround the gardens and grounds of a very large property, such as a country house or mansion.

Mentmore Towers

MentmoreCrafton StudMentmore Park
The Earl of Rosebery, for instance, had Dalmeny House in Scotland, Mentmore Towers in Buckinghamshire, and another house near Epsom just for the racing season.
Mentmore Towers, historically known simply as "Mentmore", is a 19th-century English country house built between 1852 and 1854 for the Rothschild family in the village of Mentmore in Buckinghamshire.

Palladian architecture

PalladianPalladian styleneo-Palladian
By the reign of Charles I, Inigo Jones and his form of Palladianism had changed the face of English domestic architecture completely, with the use of turrets and towers as an architectural reference to the earlier castles and fortified houses completely disappearing.
These wings were often adorned with porticos and pediments, often resembling, as at the much later Kedleston Hall, small country houses in their own right.