English people

EnglishEnglishmanEnglishmenBritishAngloEnglishwomanEnglandAnglo-SaxonEnglish-bornEnglish settlers
"Englanders" redirects here.wikipedia
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United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
England is the largest and most populous country of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.
People of the United Kingdom use a number of different terms to describe their national identity and may identify themselves as being British, English, Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish, or Irish; or as having a combination of different national identities.

Culture of England

English cultureEnglishquintessentially English
Over the years, English customs and identity have become fairly closely aligned with British customs and identity in general.
The culture of England is defined by the idiosyncratic cultural norms of England and the English people.

Anglo-Saxons

Anglo-SaxonSaxonAnglo Saxon
Collectively known as the Anglo-Saxons, they founded what was to become the Kingdom of England (from the Old English Englaland) by the early 10th century, in response to the invasion and minor settlement of Danes beginning in the late 9th century.
The term Anglo-Saxon is sometimes used to refer to peoples descended or associated in some way with the English ethnic group, but there is no universal definition for the term.

Celtic Britons

BritonsBritishBrythonic
The English largely descend from two main historical population groups – the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes who settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans: the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians.
After the Acts of Union 1707, the terms British and Briton gradually came to be applied to all inhabitants of the Kingdom of Great Britain, including the English, Scottish and some Northern Irish.

Irish people

IrishIrishmanIrish descent
In the 2001 UK census, respondents were invited to state their ethnicity, but while there were tick boxes for 'Irish' and for 'Scottish', there were none for 'English', or 'Welsh', who were subsumed into the general heading 'White British'.
Anglo-Normans conquered parts of Ireland in the 12th century, while England's 16th/17th-century (re)conquest and colonisation of Ireland brought many English and Lowland Scots people to parts of the island, especially the north.

Great Britain

BritishBritainGBR
Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD.
Ultimately, the population of south-east Britain came to be referred to as the English people, so-named after the Angles.

England

🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿EnglishENG
The English people are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language.
The English people are a British people.

History of Anglo-Saxon England

Anglo-Saxon EnglandAnglo-SaxonSaxon
In this case, the prevalent genes of later Anglo-Saxon England could have been largely derived from moderate numbers of Germanic migrants.
Anglo-Saxon identity survived beyond the Norman conquest, came to be known as Englishry under Norman rule, and through social and cultural integration with Celts, Danes and Anglo-Normans became the modern English people.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
The English people are the source of the English language, the Westminster system, the common law system and numerous major sports such as cricket, football, rugby union, rugby league and tennis.
English has ceased to be an "English language" in the sense of belonging only to people who are ethnically English.

Edward I of England

Edward IKing Edward IPrince Edward
Anglo-Norman continued to be used by the Plantagenet kings until Edward I came to the throne.
After a successful campaign, he subjected Wales to English rule, built a series of castles and towns in the countryside and settled them with English people.

Germanic peoples

GermanicGermanic tribesGermanic tribe
The English largely descend from two main historical population groups – the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes who settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans: the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD.
In Great Britain, Germanic people coalesced into the Anglo-Saxon (or English) people between the 8th and 10th centuries.

Englishry

Engleschrie Act 1340Presentment of Englishry
Despite the assimilation of the Normans, the distinction between 'English' and 'French' survived in official documents long after it had fallen out of common use, in particular in the legal phrase Presentment of Englishry (a rule by which a hundred had to prove an unidentified murdered body found on their soil to be that of an Englishman, rather than a Norman, if they wanted to avoid a fine).
Englishry or, in Old French, Englescherie is a legal name given, in medieval England, for the status of a person as an Englishman (i.e., as a commoner of native Anglo-Saxon stock rather than a member of the Anglo-Norman elite).

Paul Johnson (writer)

Paul JohnsonJohnson, PaulPaul M. Johnson
Writer Paul Johnson has suggested that like most dominant groups, the English have only demonstrated interest in their ethnic self-definition when they were feeling oppressed.
Paul Bede Johnson (born 2 November 1928) is an English journalist, popular historian, speechwriter, and author.

Angles

AnglianAngulusAnglii
The English largely descend from two main historical population groups – the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes who settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans: the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn (‘family of the Angles’).
This marked the passing of the old Anglo-Saxon world and the dawn of the "English" as a new people.

Irish Americans

IrishIrish-AmericanIrish American
In the 2016 American Community Survey, English Americans were (7.4%) of the United States population behind the German Americans (13.9%) and Irish Americans (10.0%).
These Protestant immigrants principally descended from Scottish and English tenant farmer colonists and colonial administrators who had settled the Plantations of Ireland, the largest of which was the Plantation of Ulster, and these Protestant immigrants migrated primarily as families rather than individually.

English Americans

EnglishEnglish AmericanAnglo-American
In the 2016 American Community Survey, English Americans were (7.4%) of the United States population behind the German Americans (13.9%) and Irish Americans (10.0%).

Scotch-Irish Americans

Scots-IrishScotch-IrishScotch-Irish American
Scots-Irish Americans are descendants of Lowland Scots and Northern English (specifically: County Durham, Cumberland, Northumberland and Westmorland) settlers who colonised Ireland during the Plantation of Ulster in the 17th century.
He notes the borderers had substantial English and Scandinavian roots.

Frisians

FrisianFrisian peopleFriesian
The English largely descend from two main historical population groups – the earlier Celtic Britons (or Brythons) and the Germanic tribes who settled in Britain following the withdrawal of the Romans: the Angles, Saxons, Jutes and Frisians.

Welsh people

Welshits peopleWelshman
In the 2001 UK census, respondents were invited to state their ethnicity, but while there were tick boxes for 'Irish' and for 'Scottish', there were none for 'English', or 'Welsh', who were subsumed into the general heading 'White British'.

English diaspora

English parents or grandparents
The English diaspora consists of English people and their descendants who emigrated from England.

List of English people

English
Listed below are English people of note and some notable individuals born in England.

Scottish Canadians

ScottishScottish-CanadianScottish Canadian
Bonar Law, by origin a Scotch Canadian, was not ashamed to describe himself as "Prime Minister of England" [...] Now terms have become more rigorous.

British people

BritishUnited KingdomBritons
The complex history of the formation of the United Kingdom created a "particular sense of nationhood and belonging" in Great Britain and Ireland; Britishness became "superimposed on much older identities", of English, Scots, Welsh and Irish cultures, whose distinctiveness still resists notions of a homogenised British identity.

English nationalism

English nationalistEnglishEnglish nationalists
English nationalism is the nationalism that asserts that the English are a nation and promotes the cultural unity of English people.

Anglo-Indian

Anglo-IndiansAnglo IndianNominated
The term Anglo-Indian can refer to at least two groups of people: those with mixed Indian and British (specifically English) ancestry and people of British/English descent born or living in India.