Enide

Enid (in the Idylls of the King), illustrated by Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale

Character in Arthurian romance.

- Enide

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Erec and Enide

First of Chrétien de Troyes' five romance poems, completed around 1170.

The White Stag hunt in a medieval manuscript
The opening lines of the Welsh language version of Geraint and Enid (pre 1382), from the Red Book of Hergest manuscript

Approximately the first quarter of Erec and Enide recounts the tale of Erec, son of Lac, and his marriage to Enide, an impoverished daughter of a vavasor from Lalut.

Geraint

Character from Welsh folklore and Arthurian legend.

Howard Pyle's illustration for The Story of the Grail and the Passing of King Arthur (1910)
Geraint, with his wife Enid, from The Idylls of the King

Geraint is possibly most famous as the protagonist in the Welsh tale Geraint and Enid, where he becomes the lover of Enid.

Idylls of the King

Cycle of twelve narrative poems by the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson which retells the legend of King Arthur, his knights, his love for Guinevere and her tragic betrayal of him, and the rise and fall of Arthur's kingdom.

Title page of the first edition
"Geraint and Enid Ride Away", illustration by Gustave Doré, 1868
The Lady of the Lake steals Lancelot from his mother, illustration by George Wooliscroft Rhead Jr., 1898

Geraint, tributary prince of Devon and one of Arthur's bravest knights, is married to Enid, the only daughter of Yniol.

Three Welsh Romances

The Three Welsh Romances (Welsh: Y Tair Rhamant) are three Middle Welsh tales associated with the Mabinogion.

The opening lines of Owain from Jesus College, Oxford (MS 111}
"Enid and Geraint Reconciled", Louis Rhead and George Rhead's illustration for Idylls of the King (1898)
The opening lines of Peredur on Jesus College, Oxford (MS 111)

The romance concerns the love of Geraint, one of King Arthur's men, and the beautiful Enid.

Knights of the Round Table

The Knights of the Round Table (Marchogion y Ford Gron, Marghekyon an Moos Krenn, Marc'hegien an Daol Grenn) are the knights of the fellowship of King Arthur in the literary cycle of the Matter of Britain.

Piety: The Knights of the Round Table about to Depart in Quest of the Holy Grail by William Dyce (1849)
The attributed arms of Agloval de Galles
"Queen Guenever's Peril." Alfred Kappes' illustration for The Boy's King Arthur (1880)
The arms of Arthur le Petit
Shared attributed arms of Blamor and Blioberis
Brandelis' attributed arms
The attributed arms of Calogrenant
Calogrenant at the fountain in the BN MS fr.1433 manuscript of Yvain ou le chevalier au lion (c. 1325)
The attributed arms of "Dodinet le Sauvaige"
The arms of Helain le Blanc
The attributed arms of "Herec le fils Lac"
The attributed arms of "Exclabor ly Viescovtiens"
The attributed arms of the Duc de Clerence
Girflet's attributed arms
Giflet throwing Excalibur into the lake in a 1470 illustration for the 13th-century romance La Mort du roi Arthur
The attributed arms of Hector des Mares
Lancelot stops his half-brother Hector from killing Arthur defeated in battle, as depicted by William Dyce in King Arthur Unhorsed, Spared by Sir Launcelot (1852)
The attributed arms of "Lucam le Bouteillier"
Mador's attributed arms
"At last the strange knight smote him to the earth, and gave him such a bugget on the helm as well-night killed him." Lancelot Speed's illustration for The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights, abridged from Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur by James Knowles (1912)
The attributed arms of "Mellienderis"
The attributed arms of Morholt d'Irlande
Saphar's attributed arms
The attributed arms of "Securades"
"Sir Segwarides rides after Sir Tristram." F. A. Fraser's illustration for Henry Frith's King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (1912)
The attributed arms of Tor
The attributed arms of Yvain the Bastard
His attributed arms
Le Morte d'Arthur scene of Guinevere with some of her unarmed knights before they are ambushed by Maleagant, as depicted in Queen Guinevere's Maying by John Collier
The attributed arms of Seguran le Brun

In Chrétien's story, Erec meets his future wife Enide while on a quest to defeat a knight who had mistreated one of Queen Guinevere's servants.

Yniol

Enid (in the Idylls of the King), illustrated by Eleanor Fortescue-Brickdale

Yniol is the father of Enid in Arthurian legend, appearing in Geraint and Enid.

The Mirror (poem)

Poem in the form of a cywydd by the 14th-century bard Dafydd ap Gwilym, widely seen as the greatest of the Welsh poets.

An anonymous 19th century imaginary portrait of Dafydd ap Gwilym.
Detail of an illumination from the 14th-century De Lisle Psalter, BL Arundel MS 83, f.126v. It depicts a young man using a comb and a hand mirror of the kind Dafydd describes in this poem.

The northern manuscripts of the poem give her name as Enid, who appears in Geraint son of Erbin, but the White Book of Hergest manuscripts give it as Luned, heroine of The Lady of the Fountain.

Welsh mythology

Welsh mythology consists of both folk traditions developed in Wales, and traditions developed by the Celtic Britons elsewhere before the end of the first millennium.

The Two Kings (sculptor Ivor Roberts-Jones, 1984) near Harlech Castle, Wales. Brân the Blessed carries the body of his nephew Gwern.
Beginning of The Dream of Macsen Wledig from the White Book of Rhydderch, f.45.r
The opening lines of Lludd and Llefelys (Bodleian Library's manuscript)
History of the Kings (f.75.v) King Arthur
The opening lines of Culhwch and Olwen, from the Red Book of Hergest
Gronw and Blodeuwedd
Efnysien's self-sacrifice (image by T. Prytherch)
Rhiannon and Pryderi

The romance concerns the love of Geraint, one of King Arthur's men, and the beautiful Enid.

The Story of the Grail and the Passing of King Arthur

1910 novel by the American illustrator and writer Howard Pyle.

Madame de Pompadour spending her afternoon with a book (François Boucher, 1756)

The book tells of Sir Geraint and his wife Enid, Sir Galahad and how he achieved the Holy Grail, and the death of King Arthur.

Gawain

Character in Arthurian legend, in which he is King Arthur's nephew and a Knight of the Round Table.

Sir Gawaine the Son of Lot, King of Orkney, by Howard Pyle from The Story of King Arthur and His Knights (1903)
"Gavvain's" attributed arms
"Galvagin" depicted in the Italian Modena Archivolt (c. 1135)
Gawain unwittingly fights Yvain in the Garrett MS. No. 125 manuscript of Chrétien's Knight of the Lion (c. 1295)
"Walewein" follows a flying checkboard in a 14th-century Dutch manuscript Roman van Walewein (en het schaakspel)
"Sir Gawain seized his lance and bade them farewell", Frank T. Merrill's illustration for A Knight of Arthur's Court or the Tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (1910)
"The Passing of Sir Gawaine", Howard Pyle's illustration from The Story of the Grail and the Passing of King Arthur (1910)
Parzival's Gawain in a capital relief at the Church of Saint-Pierre, Caen
"Sir Gawaine finds the beautiful Lady", Howard Pyle's illustration from The Story of King Arthur and His Knights (1903)
John Tenniel's illustration for "The Song of Courtesy", George Meredith's take on Gawain and the Loathly Lady published in Once a Week magazine in 1859
The Vigil by John Pettie (1884)
"Nevertheless You, O Sir Gauwaine, Lie." Florence Harrison's illustration for Early Poems of William Morris (1914)
"In the morning one of these ladies came to Gawaine." William Henry Margetson's illustration for Legends of King Arthur and His Knights (1914)
"Now you have released me from the spell completely." William Henry Margetson's illustration for Hero-Myths and Legends of the British Race (1910)
Sir Gawain bends over the exhausted Maid Avoraine in concern after she has proved her love by running after his horse for two days. John Everett Millais' and Joseph Swain's wood engraving illustration for Robert Williams Buchanan's poem "Maid Avoraine" published in Once a Week magazine in 1862

As such, he is the champion of all women, and through this reputation, he has avoided the name-pairing seen in tales of Erec (with Enide), Tristan (with Iseult), and Lancelot (with Guinevere).