Entomology

entomologistentomologicalentomologistsmedical entomologistpaleoentomologistinsectapplied entomologyentomologicallyentomologist.History of entomology
Entomology is the scientific study of insects, a branch of zoology.wikipedia
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William Kirby (entomologist)

KirbyWilliam KirbyW. Kirby
William Kirby is widely considered as the father of entomology.
William Kirby (19 September 1759 – 4 July 1850) was an English entomologist, an original member of the Linnean Society and a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a country priest, making him an eminent parson-naturalist.

Lepidopterology

lepidopteristlepidopterologistlepidoptery
He also helped to found the Royal Entomological Society in London in 1833, one of the earliest such societies in the world; earlier antecedents, such as the Aurelian society date back to the 1740s.
Lepidopterology (from Ancient Greek λεπίδος (scale) and πτερόν (wing); and -λογία -logia.), is a branch of entomology concerning the scientific study of moths and the three superfamilies of butterflies.

Vladimir Nabokov

NabokovVladimir Vladimirovich NabokovNabokovian
Entomology developed rapidly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and was studied by large numbers of people, including such notable figures as Charles Darwin, Jean-Henri Fabre, Vladimir Nabokov, Karl von Frisch (winner of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine), and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner E. O. Wilson.
Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Влади́мир Влади́мирович Набо́ков ; 22 April 1899 – 2 July 1977), also known by the pen name Vladimir Sirin, was a Russian and American novelist, poet, translator and entomologist.

Jean-Henri Fabre

Jean Henri FabreFabreJean-Henri Casimir Fabre
Entomology developed rapidly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and was studied by large numbers of people, including such notable figures as Charles Darwin, Jean-Henri Fabre, Vladimir Nabokov, Karl von Frisch (winner of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine), and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner E. O. Wilson.
Jean-Henri Casimir Fabre (22 December 1823 – 11 October 1915) was a French naturalist, entomologist, and author known for the lively style of his popular books on the lives of insects.

Sophie Lutterlough

There has also been a history of people becoming entomologists through museum curation and research assistance, such as Sophie Lutterlough at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
Sophie Lutterlough (1910–2009) was an American entomologist.

E. O. Wilson

Edward O. WilsonE.O. WilsonEdward Osborne Wilson
Entomology developed rapidly in the 19th and 20th centuries, and was studied by large numbers of people, including such notable figures as Charles Darwin, Jean-Henri Fabre, Vladimir Nabokov, Karl von Frisch (winner of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine), and two-time Pulitzer Prize winner E. O. Wilson.
At the age of 18, intent on becoming an entomologist, he began by collecting flies, but the shortage of insect pins caused by World War II caused him to switch to ants, which could be stored in vials.

Insect

Insectainsectsbugs
Entomology is the scientific study of insects, a branch of zoology.
A calque of Greek ἔντομον [éntomon], "cut into sections", Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies.

Myrmecology

myrmecologistmyrmecologistsmyrmecological
Myrmecology (from Greek: μύρμηξ, myrmex, "ant" and λόγος, logos, "study") is a branch of entomology focusing on the scientific study of ants.

Zoology

zoologistzoologicalzoologists
Entomology is the scientific study of insects, a branch of zoology.
For example, it generally involves scientists who have special training in particular organisms such as mammalogy, ornithology, herpetology, or entomology, but use those organisms as systems to answer general questions about evolution.

William Spence (entomologist)

William SpenceSpence
In collaboration with William Spence, he published a definitive entomological encyclopedia, Introduction to Entomology, regarded as the subject's foundational text.
William Spence (c.1783 – 6 January 1860) was a British economist and entomologist.

German Entomological Institute

Deutsches Entomologisches InstitutInstitut fur PflanzenschutzforschungSenckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut
The German Entomological Institute (Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, or DEI) is a German entomological research institute devoted to the study of insects.

Melittology

ApiologyapiologistApicology
Melittology (from Greek μέλιττα, melitta, "bee"; and -λογία -logia) is a branch of entomology concerning the scientific study of bees.

Royal Entomological Society

Entomological Society of LondonRoyal Entomological Society of LondonFRES
He also helped to found the Royal Entomological Society in London in 1833, one of the earliest such societies in the world; earlier antecedents, such as the Aurelian society date back to the 1740s.
Its aims are to disseminate information about insects and improving communication between entomologists.

Entomologischer Verein Krefeld

Krefeld Entomological Society
The Entomologischer Verein Krefeld (EVK) is an entomological society based in Krefeld, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

National Museum of Natural History

USNMSmithsonian Museum of Natural HistorySmithsonian National Museum of Natural History
There has also been a history of people becoming entomologists through museum curation and research assistance, such as Sophie Lutterlough at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History.
Research in the museum is divided into seven departments: anthropology, botany, entomology, invertebrate zoology, mineral sciences, paleobiology, vertebrate zoology.

Entomological Society of America

American Association of Economic EntomologistsAnnals of the Entomological Society of AmericaAmerican Entomologist
To facilitate communication among members, the ESA is divided into four sections based on entomological interests, and six branches, based on geographic proximity.

Natural History Museum, London

Natural History MuseumBritish Museum of Natural HistoryBritish Museum (Natural History)
The museum is home to life and earth science specimens comprising some 80 million items within five main collections: botany, entomology, mineralogy, paleontology and zoology.

Coleopterology

coleopteristcoleopterologistColeopterological
Coleopterology (from Coleoptera and Greek -λογία, -logia) is a branch of entomology, the scientific study of beetles of the order Coleoptera.

Ant

Formicidaeantsformicid
During the species-specific breeding period, winged females and winged males, known to entomologists as alates, leave the colony in what is called a nuptial flight.

Amateur Entomologists' Society

The Amateur Entomologists' Society
Based in the UK, the Amateur Entomologists' Society was founded in 1935 as The Entomological Exchange and Correspondence Club, for the purpose of providing a forum through which amateur and young entomologists could exchange not only information, but also equipment and other such items.

Agriculture

farmingagriculturalAgriculturist
Entomology is rooted in nearly all human cultures from prehistoric times, primarily in the context of agriculture (especially biological control and beekeeping).
It covers topics such as agronomy, plant breeding and genetics, plant pathology, crop modelling, soil science, entomology, production techniques and improvement, study of pests and their management, and study of adverse environmental effects such as soil degradation, waste management, and bioremediation.

Oxford University Museum of Natural History

Oxford University MuseumHope Department of EntomologyUniversity Museum
The last department to leave the building was the entomology department, which moved into the zoology building in 1978.

California Academy of Sciences

California Academy of ScienceSteinhart AquariumMorrison Planetarium
Academy scientists, under the Academy's Institute for Biodiversity Science and Sustainability, conduct systematic and conservation research in several different fields, including anthropology, marine biology, botany, entomology, herpetology, ichthyology, invertebrate zoology, mammalogy, ornithology, geology, and paleontology.

Entomological Society of Japan

The Entomological Society of Japan was founded in 1917 for the purpose of improving and promoting entomology in Japan.

Netherlands Entomological Society

The Netherlands Entomological Society (Nederlandse Entomologische Vereniging, abbreviated NEV) was founded in 1845 for the purpose of improving and promoting entomology in the Netherlands.