A report on Entomology

A Phyllium sp., mimicking a leaf
Plate from Transactions of the Entomological Society, 1848.
These 100 Trigonopterus species were described simultaneously using DNA barcoding.
Example of a collection barcode on a pinned beetle specimen
Several prominent American entomologists of the 1800s
The Entomology Research Collection at Lincoln University, New Zealand, with curator John Marris

Scientific study of insects, a branch of zoology.

- Entomology
A Phyllium sp., mimicking a leaf

41 related topics with Alpha

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Ant

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Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera.

Ants are eusocial insects of the family Formicidae and, along with the related wasps and bees, belong to the order Hymenoptera.

Ants fossilised in Baltic amber
Diagram of a worker ant (Neoponera verenae)
Bull ant showing the powerful mandibles and the relatively large compound eyes that provide excellent vision
Ant head
Seven leafcutter ant workers of various castes (left) and two queens (right)
Meat eater ant nest during swarming
Alate male ant, Prenolepis imparis
Honey ants (Prenolepis imparis) mating
Fertilised meat-eater ant queen beginning to dig a new colony
Two Camponotus sericeus workers communicating through touch and pheromones
A Plectroctena sp. attacks another of its kind to protect its territory.
A weaver ant in fighting position, mandibles wide open
Ant mound holes prevent water from entering the nest during rain.
Two Weaver ants walking in tandem.
Leaf nest of weaver ants, Pamalican, Philippines
Myrmecocystus, honeypot ants, store food to prevent colony famine.
An ant trail
Meat-eater ants feeding on a cicada: social ants cooperate and collectively gather food
A worker Harpegnathos saltator (a jumping ant) engaged in battle with a rival colony's queen (on top)
The spider Myrmarachne plataleoides (female shown) mimics weaver ants to avoid predators.
An ant collects honeydew from an aphid
Ants may obtain nectar from flowers such as the dandelion, but are only rarely known to pollinate flowers.
A meat ant tending a common leafhopper nymph
Spiders (Like this Menemerus jumping spider) sometimes feed on ants
Weaver ants are used as a biological control for citrus cultivation in southern China.
Roasted ants in Colombia
Ant larvae for sale in Isaan, Thailand
The tiny pharaoh ant is a major pest in hospitals and office blocks; it can make nests between sheets of paper.
Camponotus nearcticus workers travelling between two formicaria through connector tubing
Aesop's ants: illustration by Milo Winter, 1888–1956
An ant pictured in the coat of arms of Multia

During the species-specific breeding period, winged females and winged males, known to entomologists as alates, leave the colony in what is called a nuptial flight.

Lithograph by T.H. Maguire

William Kirby (entomologist)

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Lithograph by T.H. Maguire
William Kirby

William Kirby (19 September 1759 – 4 July 1850) was an English entomologist, an original member of the Linnean Society and a Fellow of the Royal Society, as well as a country rector, so that he was an eminent example of the "parson-naturalist".

Meat eater ant feeding on honey

Myrmecology

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Meat eater ant feeding on honey

Myrmecology (from Greek: μύρμηξ, myrmex, "ant" and λόγος, logos, "study") is a branch of entomology focusing on the scientific study of ants.

Wilson in 2003

E. O. Wilson

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American biologist, naturalist, and writer.

American biologist, naturalist, and writer.

Wilson in 2003
Wilson at a "fireside chat" during which he received the Addison Emery Verrill Medal in 2007
Wilson addresses the audience at the dedication of the Biophilia Center named for him at Nokuse Plantation in Walton County, Florida.

At age 18, intent on becoming an entomologist, he began by collecting flies, but the shortage of insect pins caused by World War II caused him to switch to ants, which could be stored in vials.

Evolution has produced enormous variety in insects. Pictured are some possible shapes of antennae.

Insect

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Insects (from Latin insectum) are pancrustacean hexapod invertebrates of the class Insecta.

Insects (from Latin insectum) are pancrustacean hexapod invertebrates of the class Insecta.

Evolution has produced enormous variety in insects. Pictured are some possible shapes of antennae.
A pie chart of described eukaryote species, showing just over half of these to be insects
Insects with population trends documented by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, for orders Collembola, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera, Odonata, and Orthoptera. Of 203 insect species that had such documented population trends in 2013, 33% were in decline.
Stylized diagram of insect digestive tract showing malpighian tubule, from an insect of the order Orthoptera
Bumblebee defecating. Note the contraction of the abdomen to provide internal pressure
The tube-like heart (green) of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae extends horizontally across the body, interlinked with the diamond-shaped wing muscles (also green) and surrounded by pericardial cells (red). Blue depicts cell nuclei.
The different forms of the male (top) and female (bottom) tussock moth Orgyia recens is an example of sexual dimorphism in insects.
Gulf fritillary life cycle, an example of holometabolism.
Most insects have compound eyes and two antennae.
A cathedral mound created by termites (Isoptera).
White-lined sphinx moth feeding in flight
The backswimmer Notonecta glauca underwater, showing its paddle-like hindleg adaptation
Perhaps one of the most well-known examples of mimicry, the viceroy butterfly (top) appears very similar to the monarch butterfly (bottom).
European honey bee carrying pollen in a pollen basket back to the hive
Aedes aegypti, a parasite, is the vector of dengue fever and yellow fever
Because they help flowering plants to cross-pollinate, some insects are critical to agriculture. This European honey bee is gathering nectar while pollen collects on its body.
A robberfly with its prey, a hoverfly. Insectivorous relationships such as these help control insect populations.
The common fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is one of the most widely used organisms in biological research.
Insect morphology 
A- Head B- Thorax C- Abdomen
Basic motion of the insect wing in insect with an indirect flight mechanism scheme of dorsoventral cut through a thorax segment with a wings, b joints, c dorsoventral muscles, d longitudinal muscles.

A calque of (éntomon), "cut into sections", Pliny the Elder introduced the Latin designation as a loan-translation of the Ancient Greek word ἔντομος (éntomos) or "insect" (as in entomology), which was Aristotle's term for this class of life, also in reference to their "notched" bodies.

frameless

Royal Entomological Society

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Devoted to the study of insects.

Devoted to the study of insects.

frameless
Plate from Transactions of the Entomological Society for 1848
Royal Entomological Society badge

Its aims are to disseminate information about insects and improving communication between entomologists.

A Lepidoptera specimen drawer in a museum collection in Poland

Lepidopterology

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A Lepidoptera specimen drawer in a museum collection in Poland
Another Lepidoptera specimen drawer in a museum collection in Poland
Géographe and Naturaliste

Lepidopterology ) is a branch of entomology concerning the scientific study of moths and the three superfamilies of butterflies.

Nabokov in Montreux, Switzerland, 1973

Vladimir Nabokov

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Nabokov in Montreux, Switzerland, 1973
The author's grandfather Dmitry Nabokov, Justice Minister under Tsar Alexander II.
The author's father, V. D. Nabokov in his World War I officer's uniform, 1914
The Nabokov family's mansion in Saint Petersburg. Today it is the site of the Nabokov museum
The Rozhdestveno estate 16-year-old Nabokov inherited from his maternal uncle. Nabokov possessed it for less than a year before losing it in the October Revolution.
957 East State St., Ithaca, New York, where Nabokov lived with his family in 1947 and again in 1953 while teaching at Cornell University. Here he finished Lolita and started writing Pnin.
The grave of the Nabokovs at Cimetière de Clarens near Montreux, Switzerland
Nabokov in the 1960s
Nabokov in 1973
Monument of Nabokov in Montreux

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov (Владимир Владимирович Набоков ; 22 April 1899 – 2 July 1977), also known by the pen name Vladimir Sirin (Владимир Сирин), was a Russian-American novelist, poet, translator, and entomologist.

Darwin, c. undefined 1854, when he was preparing On the Origin of Species for publication

Charles Darwin

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English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to evolutionary biology.

English naturalist, geologist and biologist, best known for his contributions to evolutionary biology.

Darwin, c. undefined 1854, when he was preparing On the Origin of Species for publication
A chalk drawing of the seven-year-old Darwin in 1816, with a potted plant, by Ellen Sharples
Bicentennial portrait by Anthony Smith of Darwin as a student, in the courtyard at Christ's College, Cambridge where he had rooms.
The round-the-world voyage of the Beagle, 1831–1836
Darwin (right) on the Beagle's deck at Bahía Blanca in Argentina, with fossils; caricature by Augustus Earle, the initial ship's artist.
As HMS Beagle surveyed the coasts of South America, Darwin theorised about geology and the extinction of giant mammals. Watercolour by the ship's artist Conrad Martens, who replaced Augustus Earle, in Tierra del Fuego.
While still a young man, Darwin joined the scientific elite. Portrait by George Richmond.
In mid-July 1837 Darwin started his "B" notebook on Transmutation of Species, and on page 36 wrote "I think" above his first evolutionary tree.
Darwin chose to marry his cousin, Emma Wedgwood.
Darwin in 1842 with his eldest son, William Erasmus Darwin
Darwin's "sandwalk" at Down House was his usual "Thinking Path".
Darwin aged 46 in 1855, by then working towards publication of his theory of natural selection. He wrote to Joseph Hooker about this portrait, "if I really have as bad an expression, as my photograph gives me, how I can have one single friend is surprising."
During the Darwin family's 1868 holiday in her Isle of Wight cottage, Julia Margaret Cameron took portraits showing the bushy beard Darwin grew between 1862 and 1866.
An 1871 caricature following publication of The Descent of Man was typical of many showing Darwin with an ape body, identifying him in popular culture as the leading author of evolutionary theory.
By 1878, an increasingly famous Darwin had suffered years of illness.
The adjoining tombs of John Herschel and Charles Darwin in the nave of Westminster Abbey, London
In 1881 Darwin was an eminent figure, still working on his contributions to evolutionary thought that had an enormous effect on many fields of science. Copy of a portrait by John Collier in the National Portrait Gallery, London.
Unveiling of the Darwin Statue at the former Shrewsbury School building in 1897
In 1851 Darwin was devastated when his daughter Annie died. By then his faith in Christianity had dwindled, and he had stopped going to church.
A caricature of Darwin from a 1871 Vanity Fair
Statue of Darwin in the Natural History Museum, London

Fox impressed him with his butterfly collection, introducing Darwin to entomology and influencing him to pursue beetle collecting.

William Spence

William Spence (entomologist)

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William Spence

William Spence (c.1783 – 6 January 1860) was a British economist and entomologist.