Environmental vegetarianism

environmentalenvironmental concernsby being vegetarianenvironmentenvironmental benefits of vegetarianismenvironmental veganismenvironmental vegetariansthe environmental and climate change implications
Environmental vegetarianism is the practice of vegetarianism or eating a plant-based diet based on the indications that animal-based industries are environmentally destructive or unsustainable.wikipedia
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Vegetarianism

vegetarianvegetariansvegetarian diet
Environmental vegetarianism is the practice of vegetarianism or eating a plant-based diet based on the indications that animal-based industries are environmentally destructive or unsustainable.
Other motivations for vegetarianism are health-related, political, environmental, cultural, aesthetic, economic, or personal preference.

Economic vegetarianism

economic
Environmental vegetarianism can be compared with economic vegetarianism.
They may be vegetarian for other reasons; and there may be significant overlap between these beliefs (e.g. between economic and environmental vegetarians).

Vegan organic gardening

vegan organic agriculturevegan organic farmingvegan organic
Vegan organic gardening
Environmental vegetarianism

Plant-based diet

plant-basedfruit-based dietplant based diet
Environmental vegetarianism is the practice of vegetarianism or eating a plant-based diet based on the indications that animal-based industries are environmentally destructive or unsustainable.

Sustainable development

sustainablesustainable growthsustainability
Environmental vegetarianism is the practice of vegetarianism or eating a plant-based diet based on the indications that animal-based industries are environmentally destructive or unsustainable.

Pollution

pollutedenvironmental pollutionpollution control
The primary environmental concerns with animal products are pollution—including greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)—deforestation, and the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land.

Greenhouse gas

greenhouse gasescarbon emissionsgreenhouse gas emissions
The primary environmental concerns with animal products are pollution—including greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)—deforestation, and the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land.

Deforestation

deforestedland clearingforest clearing
The primary environmental concerns with animal products are pollution—including greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)—deforestation, and the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land. According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Fossil fuel

fossil fuelsoil and gasfossil-fuel
The primary environmental concerns with animal products are pollution—including greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)—deforestation, and the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land.

Water scarcity

water stresswater crisiswater shortage
The primary environmental concerns with animal products are pollution—including greenhouse gas emissions (GHG)—deforestation, and the use of resources such as fossil fuels, water, and land.

Carbon Balance and Management

A 2017 study published in the journal Carbon Balance and Management found animal agriculture's global methane emissions are 11% higher than previous estimates based on data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

IPCCIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)International Panel on Climate Change
A 2017 study published in the journal Carbon Balance and Management found animal agriculture's global methane emissions are 11% higher than previous estimates based on data from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The Lancet

LancetLancet OncologyLancet Infectious Diseases
According to a 2019 report in The Lancet, global meat consumption needs be reduced by 50 percent to mitigate climate change.

Food and Agriculture Organization

FAOFood and Agriculture Organization of the United NationsUnited Nations Food and Agriculture Organization
According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Livestock's Long Shadow

Livestock's Long Shadow – Environmental Issues and OptionsLivestock's Long Shadow - Environmental Issues and Options
According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Global warming

climate changeglobal climate changeanthropogenic climate change
According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Land degradation

degradedpoor farming practicesdegraded land
According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Biodiversity

diversitybiological diversitybiodiverse
According to the 2006 Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) report Livestock's Long Shadow, animal agriculture contributes on a "massive scale" to global warming, air pollution, land degradation, energy use, deforestation, and biodiversity decline.

Livestock

farm animalsfarm animalstock
The FAO report estimates that the livestock (including poultry) sector (which provides draft animal power, leather, wool, milk, eggs, fertilizer, pharmaceuticals, etc., in addition to meat) contributes about 18 percent of global GHG emissions expressed as 100-year CO 2 equivalents.

Carbon dioxide

CO 2 CO2carbon dioxide (CO 2 )
The FAO report estimates that the livestock (including poultry) sector (which provides draft animal power, leather, wool, milk, eggs, fertilizer, pharmaceuticals, etc., in addition to meat) contributes about 18 percent of global GHG emissions expressed as 100-year CO 2 equivalents.

Life-cycle assessment

life cycle assessmentlife cycle analysiswell-to-wheel
This estimate was based on life-cycle analysis, including feed production, land use changes, etc., and used GWP (global warming potential) of 23 for methane and 296 for nitrous oxide, to convert emissions of these gases to 100-year CO 2 equivalents.

Global warming potential

global-warming potentialGWP22 times more powerful
This estimate was based on life-cycle analysis, including feed production, land use changes, etc., and used GWP (global warming potential) of 23 for methane and 296 for nitrous oxide, to convert emissions of these gases to 100-year CO 2 equivalents.

Methane emissions

methanelargest natural sourcemethane pollution
For example, the FAO report estimates that 37 percent of global anthropogenic methane emissions are attributable to the livestock sector, and a NASA summary indicates about 30 percent.

NASA

National Aeronautics and Space AdministrationNational Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)space program
For example, the FAO report estimates that 37 percent of global anthropogenic methane emissions are attributable to the livestock sector, and a NASA summary indicates about 30 percent.