Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

eosinophilic enteritis
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare and heterogeneous condition characterized by patchy or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of gastrointestinal (GI) tissue, first described by Kaijser in 1937.wikipedia
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Malabsorption

malabsorption syndromeintestinal malabsorptionmalabsorption of nutrients
Mucosal EG (25–100%) is the most common variety, which presents with features of malabsorption and protein losing enteropathy. Failure to thrive and anaemia may also be present. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may imply colonic involvement.

Abdominal distension

abdominal distentiondistensiondistended
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

Eosinophilia

Eosinophilicpulmonary eosinophiliaan increase of eosinophils in the blood
Peripheral blood eosinophilia and elevated serum IgE are usual but not universal.
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

Hypereosinophilia

diseases associated with pathologically increased levels of blood eosinophilsabnormally high levels of circulating blood eosinophils
Hypereosinophilia, the hallmark of allergic response, may be absent in up to 20% of patients, but hypoalbuminaemia and other abnormalities suggestive of malabsorption may be present.
Examples of organ-restricted hypereosinopilia include eosinophilic myocarditis, eosinophilic esophagitis, eosinophilic gastroenteritis, eosinophilic cystitis, eosinophilic pneumonia, eosinophilic fasciitis, eosinophilic folliculitis, eosinophilic cellulitis, eosinophilic vasculitis, and eosinophilic ulcer of the oral mucosa.

Eosinophilic esophagitis

inflammation of the esophaguseosinophilic oesophagitis
Eosinophilic esophagitis
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis

Eosinophilic

pink-stainingeosinophilic cellseosinophilic granulocytes
Eosinophilic gastroenteritis (EG) is a rare and heterogeneous condition characterized by patchy or diffuse eosinophilic infiltration of gastrointestinal (GI) tissue, first described by Kaijser in 1937.

Stomach

gastricfunduscardia
The stomach is the organ most commonly affected, followed by the small intestine and the colon.

Organ (anatomy)

organorgansviscera
The stomach is the organ most commonly affected, followed by the small intestine and the colon.

Small intestine

small bowelsmall intestinessmall
The stomach is the organ most commonly affected, followed by the small intestine and the colon.

Large intestine

coloncolorectallarge bowel
The stomach is the organ most commonly affected, followed by the small intestine and the colon.

Abdominal pain

stomach acheupset stomachstomachache
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.

Diarrhea

diarrhoeadiarrheal diseaseschronic diarrhea
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.

Nausea

nauseousvomitingfeeling of sickness
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.

Vomiting

emeticvomitemesis
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.

Weight loss

weight-losslose weightlosing weight
EG typically presents with a combination of chronic nonspecific GI symptoms which include abdominal pain, diarrhea, occasional nausea and vomiting, weight loss and abdominal distension.

Protein losing enteropathy

protein-losing enteropathyprotein-losing conditionprotein-losing enteropathic
Mucosal EG (25–100%) is the most common variety, which presents with features of malabsorption and protein losing enteropathy. Failure to thrive and anaemia may also be present. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may imply colonic involvement.

Anemia

anaemiaanemicanaemic
Mucosal EG (25–100%) is the most common variety, which presents with features of malabsorption and protein losing enteropathy. Failure to thrive and anaemia may also be present. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may imply colonic involvement.

Lower gastrointestinal bleeding

rectal bleedinghemorrhageintestinal bleeding
Mucosal EG (25–100%) is the most common variety, which presents with features of malabsorption and protein losing enteropathy. Failure to thrive and anaemia may also be present. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding may imply colonic involvement.

Cecum

caecumcaecaceca
Muscular EG (13–70%) present with obstruction of gastric outlet or small intestine; sometimes as an obstructing caecal mass or intussusception.

Intussusception (medical disorder)

intussusceptionictusintro-susception
Muscular EG (13–70%) present with obstruction of gastric outlet or small intestine; sometimes as an obstructing caecal mass or intussusception.

Serous membrane

serosaserosalserous
Subserosal EG (4.5% to 9% in Japan and 13% in the US) presents with ascites which is usually exudative in nature, abundant peripheral eosinophilia, and has favourable responses to corticosteroids.

Corticosteroid

corticosteroidssteroidssteroid
Subserosal EG (4.5% to 9% in Japan and 13% in the US) presents with ascites which is usually exudative in nature, abundant peripheral eosinophilia, and has favourable responses to corticosteroids.

Ascending cholangitis

cholangitisacute cholangitisbiliary sepsis
Other documented features are cholangitis, pancreatitis, eosinophilic splenitis, acute appendicitis and giant refractory duodenal ulcer.

Pancreatitis

gallstone pancreatitisinflammation of the pancreaspancreatic inflammation
Other documented features are cholangitis, pancreatitis, eosinophilic splenitis, acute appendicitis and giant refractory duodenal ulcer.

Splenomegaly

enlarged spleenhypersplenismspleen
Other documented features are cholangitis, pancreatitis, eosinophilic splenitis, acute appendicitis and giant refractory duodenal ulcer.